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SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 7, 1900. 



Number I. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
SS Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office aa Second-class Matter. 

The office of the S. P. NEWS LETTER In London, En B ., U at 10 Lcaden; 
hnll Bld«. No. 1 Lcadenhall street, (Fred. V Marriott. Representative) 
where information may be obtained reirardimr subscriptions and 
advertising rates. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising, or other matter, Intended for 
publication In the current number of the NEWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 



ft 



S a political institution Tammany takes tbe cake of 
ice. 



B 




SULZER'S boom was hardly worth paying the freight 
od from New York. 

THE best thing that could happen to the Clark-Daly 
feud would be a shot-gun climax. 

FRINCE TUAN of China seems to like foreigners well 
enough, provided they are dead. 

Y what process of reasoning the small boy makes July 
4th stretch over a week is not clear to anybody else. 

LD J. Sterling Morton of Nebraska still has political 
opinions in which he seems to take deep interest. 

NONE of the Keswick gentlemen who ran the Japanese 
laborers out have offered to take the positions thus 
made vacant. 

WITH Creelman at one end of the " longest leased wire 
in the world" there is bound to be an output of fiction 
at the other. 

WHILE coursing is still classed as sport, the classifi- 
cation is regarded as defective from the standpoint 
of the rabbit. 

S GLANCE at court records shows that to rush into 
matrimony without the price of a divorce, would be 
rash indeed. 

THE traditional luck of the Oregon appears to have 
left her, or surely she would never have attempted 
the overland route to China. 



FORTO RICANS, being fed by the Government, refuse 
to work, thus displaying so soon the characteristics 
of the American office holder. 

DEMOCRATS at Kansas City worried over certain 
planks, just as though any party ever paid any at- 
tention to planks after adoption. 

JUDGED impartially, Policeman Edward Ring is at 
best an imbecile, and should be deprived of authority 
to arrest sane and sober people. 

CORRESPONDENTS once grumbled at an American 
censorship, but this was before they had come in con- 
tact with the Russian brand of the article. 

GENERAL YANG, who is to be cashiered, in spite of 
the circumstance that he has been killed, probably 
feels a soldierly satisfaction in the fact that he is dead. 

SNEW terror has been added to tbe Chinese embroglio. 
Joaquin Miller has departed for the scene of carnage, 
and the screech of his rustv pen will soon be heard in the 
columns of the Examiner. " If the Boxers couldoarff ea tf 
English, Miller's effusions would prove of mor^vgljjMhaflv 
the whole army. 



MISSIONARIES in China have hardly saved enough 
souls to pay for the slaughter of better men whose 
souls have flitted suddenly without undergoing the pro- 
cess. 

SUIT for annulment of a marriage on the ground that 
the bride was drunk, being brought by the lady her- 
self, wo'ild indicate that she had failed to arrive at a state 
of sobriety yet. 

SAN JOSE has gone back to the village method of 
snuffing out the street lights at midnight, thus follow- 
ing the example of San Francisco, just as the city got 
ashamed of itself and reformed. 



• <■ 



■ Si" kTE.. 



JULIAN Hawthorne intimates that all type not devoted 
to the printing of the Bible has been wasted, except 
such as embalmed Shakespeare and Julian Hawthorne. 
And he seems to have doubts as to Shakespeare. 

PROBABLY there is no truth in the report that Idaho 
soldiers brought back leprosy from the Philippines. 
A correct diagnosis would be apt to show that they have 
nothing that might not have been acquired at home. 

"DEMEMBER Jesus," said the priest to black-hearted, 
]\, red-handed Plannelly, standing on the gallows, and 
the double assassin responded that he would. Yet people 
wonder why popular respect for religion is waning. 

THERE are no reasons why cooking should be taught 
at school. It can be better taught at home. A girl 
who can't or won't learn at home will never build a non- 
dyspeptic biscuit under the guidance of a hired instructor. 

A MAN arrested recently for assault with a deadly 
weapon proclaimed to the police that he was a 
brother of Assemblyman Kenealy. His object in making 
his case worse than it appeared on the surface has not 
been explained. 

ACCORDING to a local paper Li Hung Chang "orders 
many daily executions," by which is probably meant 
that he daily orders many executions. There is really 
some news in the papers, provided one is able to inter- 
pret it. 

WITHOUT reasonable doubt the correspondents who 
sent out stories that during the fearful fire at New 
York tug-boat captains beat off the wretches who tried 
to climb aboard, telling them "it took money to ride," are 
malign liars. 

THE terrible conflagration at New York emphasizes 
again the danger of wooden wharves. San Francisco 
is peculiarly exposed to this risk, as her water front is of 
the rottenest description. Substantial stone piers and 
walls, though their first cost is greater, prove far more 
economical in the long run. And they would provide no 
employment for the small army of political hangers-on 
which is constantly engaged on patchwork repairs. 

THE little brown man is already making his presence 
felt amongst us, and there is likely to be serious 
trouble ahead for Uncle Sam if he is treated too often 
with Keswick courtesy. Japan is not, like China, an 
inchoate conglomeration of millions. She is a young and 
ambitious nation, with plenty of self respect, and she is 
ely to resent forcibly any indignity done to her subjects. 
v lose she were to reply by expelling all Americans from 
ipah, what would we do about it? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 



BRYAN AS A PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE. 

WHO is William Jennings Bryan, and what has he done 
for the great Democratic party that he should be its 
candidate, for the second time, for the highest office in 
the gift of the people? A narrow gauge lawyer, in an in- 
significant village in a back State, he captured the Chi- 
cago convention by a stolen metaphor about the poor man 
being "crucified on a cross of gold." At that period 
poverty stalked throughout the land, and at least a 
million starving, desperate men were ready to clutch at 
anything that promised them relief. Then arose William 
Jennings Bryan, and with a flourish of oratory difficult to 
surpass, he declared that dollars worth a hundred cents 
were the cause of all their woes. "Free and unlimited 
coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1; the same to be a 
legal tender in payment for all debts public and private," 
he pronounced to be the heaven-sent panacea for all the 
ills the country was then suffering from, and for the time 
being succeeded in satisfying an excited crowd at a con- 
vention in need of a leader, that he was the divinely ap- 
pointed messenger sent to promulgate the good news. 
Every man in the country who owed a dollar was of course 
for Bryan. A forty-five cent dollar was fully large 
enough for them, and they were a noisy and numerous 
crowd, who had not taken into account that more de- 
serving class of men and women who had saved their hun- 
dred cent dollars, and were dependent upon savings 
banks, insurance companies and pension officers to be re- 
paid in coin of like value. This prophet also told the 
farmers, whose wheat was selling at abnormally low 
prices, that cheap silver meant cheap wheat; that it was 
a universally accepted rule that as silver went down bo 
did wheat. The experience since then has been that as 
silver has gone down wheat has gone up. To-day wheat 
is away up and silver is away down, and yet Bryan is 
once again the Moses expected to lead the Democratic 
party out of the wilderness. He has been heard from, 
and despite the evidence to the contrary, declares that 
his panacea of 16 to 1 is the only true specific. Specific 
for what? The country is now prosperous in all its bor- 
ders. The greatest evil that can befall it is to have the 
existing confidence destroyed by threats of cheap silver 
dollars. The best evidence that Mr. Bryan will go down 
to an ignominious defeat, as before, is that the country 
does not take his candidature seriously, and financial in- 
terests refuse to be scared as in 1896. Mr. Bryan during 
the past four years has avoided every opportunity to be 
reconciled to the true leaders of his party. He is not 
now, and never has been, a good Democrat. 



THE ART OF LYING. 



THE old idea that diplomacy is but the art of success- 
ful lying has done much to destroy respect for states- 
manship. A diplomatist may reasonably decline to reveal 
facts, but when he makes statements known to be false, 
and designed to be misleading, he is just a plain liar. This 
art is one of which diplomacy has no monopoly. It is cul- 
tivated most assiduously by the daily press, and so marked 
has progress been in this direction that the allegations of 
correspondents, if of a startling character, are not be- 
lieved without corroborative evidence from sources dis- 
tinct from journalism. The accounts of recent conven- 
tions furnish proof enough of this. Allowing for partisan 
prejudice, it was still impossible to discern from the col- 
umns of description what was happening at Philadelphia. 
Representatives of the papers declared that Hanna was 
opposed to Roosevelt, that he regarded the prospective 
nomination of the New Yorker as the threat of calamity, 
and that when he yielded it was to a pressure he could 
not withstand. The common sense of the country, and 
ordinary knowledge of the game of politics, demonstrated 
that all these assertions were untrue. If people at this 
distance could discern the truth, surely the hired men on 
the spot could have done the same thing. They simply 
chose to misrepresent; the habit of Creelmanism was 
strong upon them. A similar state of affairs was mani- 
fest when Democrats began to arrive at Kansas City 
There were all kinds of "authentic" interviews with lead- 
ers whom the correspondents had not seen, and who, if 
seen, would have declined to say a word. The attitude of 
delegates towards the question of silver was portrayed in 



every instance so as to exactly accord with the policy of 
the paper in which the slush was to appear. The utter- 
ances of every man who had had a talk with Bryan were 
twisted to suit the occasion. The effect of all this was to 
discredit the mass of correspondents, and leave to time a 
revelation of that which really occurred. This tendency 
to lie does not pertain alone to politics, but seems to per- 
meate the whole news structure. Reports from China 
are necessarily scant and confused, and no fault can be 
found with papers for doing the best they can in regard 
to the situation there. But at New York there is no 
censorship. Why cannot the truth be given as to the 
aftermath of the recent awful fire? Why give harrowing 
details from the addled brain of space-writers? We are 
asked to credit the allegation that captains of tugs com- 
ing to the scene in quest of salvage refused to rescue vic- 
tims, because the wretches struggling to escape flames 
and water had no money; that such victims were beaten 
off and left miserably to perish. The American mind, 
accustomed to the journalistic sensation, simply refuses 
to credit such a tale. It is too brutal, too monstrous, too 
far out of touch with the humanity that is ever moved 
by the presence of death and suffering and helpless terror. 
When the Bazaar in Paris burned, the world shuddered at 
the record of cowardice and selfishness, but that was 
made by men who were themselves in deadly peril. When 
a French liner went down, there was horror renewed at 
an exhibition of heartlessness and depravity, but this also 
had been made by panic-stricken throngs about to sink in 
the deep. Now the correspondents would have us swallow 
the assertion that off the pier of New York, men who 
could have given succor, and without peril to anybody 
have saved their fellow men, declined to do so, but watched 
the spectacle of tragedy and misery while they sought 
salvage. We refuse to accept this. There is comfort in 
regarding it as a lie, and so, until indubitable proof shall 
be produced, it must be considered. It would be better 
to nave reliable news-mongers, but in this instance there 
is a grain of consolation in the certainty that this variety 
has been crowded out of business. 



THE WAY TO DEFEAT BOTH SILVER AND IMPERIALISM. 

THERE are thousands and tens of thousands of the most 
intelligent voters in this country who cannot vote for 
Bryan because of his silver fetish, and there are still more 
thousands who hate to vote for McKinley because of his 
imperialism. There is, however, a way in which all these 
voters may gain their respective ends. The re-election of 
McKinley would effectually dispose of the silver craze, and 
the choice of a Democratic House of Representatives 
would keep faith with both Cuba and the Philippines and 
allow them to govern themselves under the principles of 
our Declaration of Independence. The thing is as simple 
as shelling peas, and ought to be followed by all the anti- 
silverites and anti-imperialists in the country. The voters 
who usually vote the Republican ticket but feel that im- 
perialism is leading the country into dangers that it 
knows not of have but to stamp the cross opposite the 
name of the Democratic nominee on their ticket, and there 
will be a Democratic House of Representatives sure. The 
Republicans have only a majority of six now, which can be 
as easily wiped out as to snap your fingers. The anti-im- 
perialists hold the balance of power in most of the dis- 
tricts, and they have but to act in accordance with a com- 
mon understanding in order to stamp their will upon the 
policy of the country. In the few instances in which the 
Republican nominee may be a known and pledged anti-im- 
perialist his party friends may well let his name stand. In 
like manner there may be Democratic candidates of doubt- 
ful loyalty to their party platform, and they, of course, 
should not receive the votes of even their party friends. 
It will be no new thing to see Congress and the President 
elected from opposite parties. On the Porto Rico tariff 
question nine of the ablest members on the Republican side 
voted with the Democrats, and the measure would have 
been lost only that four Democrats were "induced" to stay 
at home without voting or pairing, and four others were 
"persuaded" to go bodily over to the enemy. We expect 
to see the plan we have suggested adopted by the antis 
all over the country before election day. The Anti-Im- 
perialist League of New York promises to become a great 
organizing power. 



July 7. 1900. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



CHINATOWN. CHRONICLE, AND NEWS LETTER. 

WE are pleaded to note that our esteemed contempor- 
ary, The Chronicle, ha? la a certain degree "come 
around" to the right in this Chinatown affair, just as we 
predicted it would do several weeks ago. The News Let- 
ter has no siren to siog its song of self, no towering build- 
ing from which to shout the policy of the world— indeed, 
we get along quite comfortably in an edifice that numbers 
only four stones — but now and then in our simple scheme 
of fearing God and telling the truth we rush in where 
dailies fear to tread, and pave the way for a good stout 
march of improvement. With a blush we mention the 
fact that we were the first in California to advocate the 
removal of the Chinese residents to some less central part 
of San Francisco than they now inhabit; that in the mean- 
time Chinatown should be bituminized in its streets, 
policed to enforce the cubic air ordinance, and prohibited 
from making dwellings below the level of the street — all 
of which The Chronicle, now that the merchants of the 
city have taken active means to indorse what we advised, 
has during the last few days advocated in both its local 
and editorial columns. We have contended right along 
that the respectable merchants of Chinatown would be 
only too glad to have their district purged of all foul mat- 
ter, quick or dead, and that it was to their interest as 
well as to the general interest of the city, that this be 
accomplished. Now a large minority, even if not major- 
ity, of the owners of Chinatown property, favor our idea, 
just as the white merchants do, just as the Chronicle does. 
We are not throwing posies at ourselves — far be it from 
that — but we congratulate our contemporary ; heartily 
we do. Chinatown in its present condition soils the city. 
Remove it to some remote place or else make it share the 
white man's burden of cleanliness. 



A SIGN FROM A WEATHER VANE. 

JAMES Gordon Bennett, of the New York Herald, is 
nothing if not an indicator of which way the political 
wind is blowing. Without a particle of literary ability of 
his own, he is one of the shrewdest literary changlings in 
the United States. Explain the matter as we may, it is 
certain that Mr. Bennett's great newspaper has suddenly 
made a most significant right- about-face. After having 
for the past two years steadily supported the administra- 
tion and its imperialist policy, it turns round, and without 
notice of what is coming, devotes a whole broadside of 
editorials to the denunciation of the Philinpine war and 
of everything else of an imperialistic character. The in- 
consistency of his course does not bother him, as it never 
has. His great art has consisted in keeping the Herald 
running with the breeze of to-day. The interest of his 
latest change consists in so shrewd a judge having con- 
cluded that the liehtning is going to strike the Democ- 
racy this time. If he is right, things political must be 
shaping themselves very differently in the East from the 
course they are taking on the Pacific Coast, where Mc- 
Kinleyism does not seem to be in any sort of danger. It 
is idle to try to fathom Mr. Bennett's brilliant genius in 
journalism. It must be said, however, that he has made 
a tardy discovery that the United States is in danger of 
transformation from a "free democracy" to "a tyrannical, 
imperialistic oligarchy." It is rather late in the day for 
a man of his unsurpassed sources of information to learn 
that "the United States is turning its back upon its own 
history and traditions." It is a surprisingly slow ac- 
knowledgment on his part that the Government is try- 
ing to "cram its rule, at the bayonet's point, down the 
throat of other people, but this has come to pass." Why 
has he not been laboring to prevent a result he now so 
sadlv deplores? If he had not lent imperialism aid and 
comfort in its early stages, it might have had a shorter 
life than now seems assured to it. 



THE LESSON THAT CHINA MUST BE TAUGHT. 

THAT the German Embassador to the court of Pekin 
has been hacked to pieces and killed almost within the 
walls of the Chinese foreign office admits of no doubt. It 
may also be presumed, we fear, that not one of the other 
foreign diplomats or their families have escaped. The 
latest accounts, now ten days' old, showed that all the 



foreign diplomats were cooped up in the British Legation, 
where, with the assistance of a number of guards, they 
were making a most heroic defense. Hut as nearly all 
their ammunition and food were exhausted, and as it has 
been Impossible for the forces at Tien Tsin to'reach them, 
it would seem that they all must have succumbed ere this. 
Be that as it may, the imprisonment, want, suffering and 
danger of death which they have endured, call for the 
severest and earliest possible punishment. No self-respect- 
ing nation can afford to permit its agents abroad to be slaugh- 
tered in any such way. There must be reprisals, swift, 
sure and terrible. Such a lesson is about the only one 
likely to strike home to the hearts of the Boxers. The 
Emperor William is already on the move to avenge Baron 
Von Eetteler's death, and we may be very sure he will do 
it. Five battleships and 20,000 troops are being prepared 
for immediate departure to the scene of action. What- 
ever the fate of the foreign diplomats may prove to be, it 
is certain that more than enough has occurred already to 
compel the other powers to unite with the avenging forces 
of Germany. It will take all the men they can spare, and 
the best generalship they have among them to penetrate 
to the heart of China and teach the Boxers the needed 
lesson. There are no railroads, the country teems with 
a people ready to fight with coolness and bravery, and it 
appears that since their war with Japan they have sup- 
plied themselves with weapons of the very latest and best 
make. There are 400,000,000 of them all told, and out of 
that number they ought to be able to put one in a hundred 
in the field, which would give them an army of four mil- 
lions. They would fight on the defensive, which, as the 
Boer war has demonstrated, is an immense advantage. 
Western civilization is up against the Oriental. The latter 
is united, whilst the former is lamentably divided. We do 
not believe that the jealousies of the European powers will 
permit of their conquering China. They could no doubt 
blockade its coasts and collect its customs, which, how- 
ever, would hurt foreign traders most. Russia and Ger- 
many and possibly, but not probably, France, will go in 
for dividing China into "spheres of influence," which all 
other countries will opDose. The great conflict the nations 
have long feared is suddenly upon us, and in a worse form 
than could have been anticipated. Better punish China 
and then leave her alone. 



ANTI-SEMITE BIGOTRY. 

THE recent action of the proprietors of the Hotel 
Rowardennan in excluding Hebrews from that place 
of resort, promptly met the widespread condemnation 
that its narrow-mindedness and bigotry called for. Our 
Jewish fellow citizens, as a rule, are above the average in 
intelligence, enterprise and wealth. Their homes are ex- 
amples of what the arch stones of society ought to be. To 
attempt to raise a race prejudice against such a people 
is unworthy of the land in which we live, and a libel upon 
the enlightenment which Americans pride themselves 
upon. We do not think the proprietors of the Hotel 
Rowardennan will take much profit from a course that 
everybody condemns. 

Having said so much, we think we have said about all 
that the case calls for. But now comes a journal that in 
its insensate hatred of our Mayor, wickedly, falsely, and 
with malice aforethought, attempts to fasten a charge of 
anti-Semiteism upon him. Everybody knows that Mayor 
Phelan is not a man of that kind. Nobody knows it better 
than our Jewish merchants and traders. James D. Phelan 
is a Californian born and raised, and no such sentiment as 
that attributed to him by the Call ever took root and 
grew hereabouts. Besides, Mr. Phelan is recognized as 
a liberal of the liberals in matters of race and religion, 
and that is one of the reasons why all classes vote for him. 
It appears that he had a little verbal tilt, of no signifi- 
cance or importance, with one Charles Edelman, a fellow 
delegate to the Kansas Convention. The whole matter 
was hardly worth a moment's thought, and if Mr. Edel- 
man be a Jew we are persuaded Mr. Phelan did not know 
it, for there are certainly no outward indications of the 
fact. In any event, anti-Semitic sentiment had no place 
in the Mayor's thoughts. A discerning public will not 
fail to take note of this latest attempt to write down an 
official who is trying to do his duty. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 



IS THERE A CHINESE SIDE? 

ARE the Chinese altogether in the wrong? If we were 
in their place, with their old traditions and civiliza- 
tion; feeling as they feel, educated as they have been edu- 
cated, and occupying a country already too densely 
populated, would we do any better than they are desiring 
to do? That is: "Keep the foreigners out." There is a 
widely spread disposition among men of the best thought 
to admit the Chinese have a case against the foreigners. 
To step into a crowded country where your presence is 
distasteful, and insist upon staying there and overrunning 
it, is no more a right than to enter a household unbidden 
and insist upon occupying it to the exclusion of its right- 
ful owners. No such proceeding would be tolerated in any 
California home where a shot gun is kept. For many 
years the incoming of Chinese foreigners has not been 
tolerated even in our own free country. We have rigidly 
excluded them by law, and taught our boys to stone and 
brick-bat them as they passed along the streets. Nay, 
morel Our grown men have fallen upon them and put 
them to death by fire, pistol, and gun as savagely as the 
Boxers have probably massacred our people in Pekin. 
These are ugly truths to contemplate, but the uglier fact 
is that they are truthsl To us, the Chinese are heathen, 
to them we are "white devils." What is the difference 
between the two? Simplv a matter of deeply ingrained 
prejudice affects both sides. We have been at pains to 
exasperate their prejudices; they have been as mindful to 
let ours alone. 

A missionary, an exceptional one who at this juncture 
ventures to discuss things as they are, has just been tell- 
ing his New England friends some straightforward facts. 
The Reverend E. E. Aitken, a member of the American 
board, says "the aggressions and insolence of foreigners 
in China have been sufficient to develop the present feeling 
of bitter hostility." Mr. Aitken, after twenty years of 
service in the China field, sanely concludes that "if mis- 
sions had confined themselves to missions, and diplomats 
had treated China decently and fairly, the Boxer move- 
ment would not have arisen." The Chinese have been 
humiliated by foreign powers in the last sixty years, more 
often than any other proud people in modern times. Eng- 
land forced the opium trade upon them, and bullied them 
whenever it suited her. France and Germany have acted 
even worse, and the European powers together, in seiz- 
ing parts of the country's seacoast, have done things un- 
der the veiled threat of force which would have driven 
any other self-respecting nation instantly to war. As to 
ourselves, as we have already pointed out, we have de- 
manded access to China, while excluding its people from 
our own land, and have massacred inoffensive "pigtails" 
who came not here to establish a new religion or annex our 
country, but to plant our farms, pick our fruits, build 
our railroads, and honestly pay their debts. All this, 
while the thought of an American being assaulted in China! 
sends the hot blood to our Christian temples. 

Lord Salisbury the other day made a timely point in a 
speech to a missionary deputation that waited upon him 
to urge action in China for the better protection of mis- 
sion "work." Bis Lordship pointed that "the Chinese 
made no attack upon Christianity as a religion, and that 
they did not interfere with missionaries because they were 
Christians." Religious toleration, be said, has long ex- 
isted in China, as is evidenced by the existence in that 
country of Confucianism, Buddhism and Mohammedism 
side by side. "But," continued the speaker, "the Chinese 
think they see in the movement to Christianize their peo- 
ple an effort to destroy their nationality and their civi- 
lization as a whole. They see in the Christian missionary 
an instrument by which secular governments achieve 
their purposes. The number of missionaries who openlv 
advocate in Western prints the partition of China or the 
overthrow of its independence, tends to justify this sus- 
picion." In other words, they were traitors to the coun- 
try from which they expected a generous hospitality 
How long would the United States tolerate the preaching 
of such doctrines in her midst by busy-bodies, backed up 
by the great powers? These missionaries expect the 
Chinese to practice more Christianity than they do them- 
selves. Let us get out of the present trouble, and 
thereafter pay that respect to others which we demand 
for ourselves. 



ADAMS AND THE EMBATTLED EVE. 

THE tempestuous teapot of Ihe women's clubs is 
stirred to the lees by rude remarks of a lecturer in 
search of an advertisement, Mr. Henry Austin Adams. 
Mr. Adams is, after the manner of his kind, working a 
greasy, threadbare dodge, taking example among others 
from that eminent faker, Mr. William T. Stead. When 
Stead came to Chicago as understudy for Christ, he was 
given an opportunity to address in public a meeting of 
clubwomen, and he raked them fore and aft like this: 

"I chiefly welcomed the opportunity to speak because, 
sitting side by side with these active workers, are some 
of the most disreputable people in Chicago." 

Who are the most disreputable women in Chicago? The 
women were staring at him in amazement. He proceeded 
to explain: 

"The most disreputable women in Chicago," he said, 
"are those who have been dowered by society and Provi- 
dence with all the gifts and opportunities; who have 
wealth and all the talents, and who live entirely self in- 
dulgent lives, caring only for themselves, thinking only of 
the welfare of their brothers and sisters. These women 
are more disreputable than the worst woman on Fourth 
avenue." 

Of course there was all kinds of a row, and equally of 
course that was what Stead wanted. That was what 
Adams wanted. They succeeded in arousing a fearful 
cackling. 

Adams condemns the woman's club as an institution. 
This is the view of the religious and theological reaction- 
ary. Above all things the reactionaries dread the en- 
lightenment and emancipation of women. The woman's 
club is a means to these ends. The instant a woman 
learns to use her reason, the church loses a member. 

It is a curious and suggestive fact that the men have 
always assumed the right to make the religions and then 
quit, leaving the women to observe them. 

CUTTING DOWN THE SOUTH'S REPRESENTATION. 

BY imposing sundry conditions to the exercise of the 
suffrage, several States in the South have managed 
to eliminate the negro vote from the control of State 
affairs. The matter was the subject of a resolution of 
enquiry which was pending when Congress adjourned, 
and was earnestly considered and generally favored by 
the Republican leaders. The object in view was to ascer- 
tain the facts preparatory to framing a plan by which the 
representation of the South should be cut down in propor- 
tion to the disfranchisement of the negro that has taken 
place. The matter was dropped for the session, as being 
bad politics in a Presidential year. It will be pushed by 
the Republicans next session, according to the assurance 
of Congressman Crumpacker, of Indiana, the author of 
the resolution. The total population of the eight distinc- 
tively Southern States is a little over 10,000,000; made up 
of 5,677,782 whites, and 4,890,621 blacks. The disfran- 
chisement of the negro would accordingly effect a reduc- 
tion to approximately that extent in the electorate of the 
States under consideration, and this, in turn, would, under 
the 14th Amendment, call for a reduction of about 46 per 
cent in their representation in Congress and the Electoral 
College. That means that the States in question would 
be allowed only about 33 votes in the House of Represent- 
atives, instead of the 61 they now have; and their vote in 
the electoral college would be similarly reduced. This 
proposition involves a strange ignoring of the 15th Amend- 
ment, which forbids disfranchisement on account of race 
or color. As the case stands, it seems that the South 
cares little about its national representation, provided it 
can be safeguarded against the evils of negro local 
government. On the other hand, the Republicans appear 
nothing loth to let the 15th amendment pass as a dead 
letter, provided the South's representation is cut down 
with the cutting out of the negro vote. This is very com- 
placent politics on both sides, but it is not very pro- 
nounced patriotism on either side. The country is so 
absorbed with wars and rumors of wars that it is forget- 
ting things dearer, and nearer home. 

Comet de Orient. 
Cigarette de Luxe— finest Turkish tobacco. At M. Blaskowkk t 
Co., 223 Montgomery St. and 1 Kearny St. , cor. Geary, San Francisco. 



July 7, 1900. 

&/>e EMPRESS 



8AN ± NKWg LKTTKh 

DOW AGER. 



I" 



B. W. A IRWIN 

the turbulent Land of the Jasamine, 

Of the queue and the almond G 
A lady rules (and you bet she rule- 

And name it is just Tsu Tsi. 
Though she isn't the hub of a woman's club, 

Now woman and all that same, 
She's an unadorned Feminine Autocrat, 

And she gets there (you bet!) just the same. 

When she wants a thing done in ber happy realm, 

Be it murder or war or Joss, 
She never lacks friends to accomplish her ends, 

And it's easy to see who's boss; [years back, 
Though she's much like the queen who a thousand 

Ruled the roost as imperial dame, [maids, 

She can give cards and spades to your up-to-date 

And she gets there (you betl) just the same. 

She isn't so much on the platform spiel, 

On ballot-box talks and all that, 
Nor does she appear in a masculine gear, 

In trousers and brother's stiff hat; 
She's too much engrossed with affairs of her own, 

(Some neat little tricks I could name), 
To worry or vex with the woes of her sex — 

But she gets there (you betl) just the same. 

She isn't emancipated at all 

Like dames of our civilized climes; 
What she doesn't know about Herr Max Nordau, 

Would fill Nordau's books many times. 
She's "downtrodden, shackled, the servant of man, 

Oppressed with her heritage, shame" — 
But in spite of her fate I'm constrained to relate; 

She gets there (you betl) just the same. 

She doesn't talk much on her natural right, 

But she'll stand for a row in Pekin, 
And her wink on the quiet is good for a riot 

Among the riff-ratf of Tien-Tsin. 
And many a noble who wears the blue plume, 

Turns pale at the sound of her name, 
And sadly reflects that, in spite of her sex, 

She gets there (alas!) just the same. 

For she is a relic of years gone by 

Before women ever were "new," 
When ladies like Kate in Slavonia sate 

Dictating what Peter should do, 
Or that naughtier Kate of the Medici line 

Brought nations to glory or shame, 
And ruled by the wile of a pout or a smile, 

And got there (you bet I ) just the same. 

San Francisco, July 7, 1900. 



State of Ohio, Citv of- Toledo, ' gg 
Lucas County. ) ' 

Frank J. Cheney makes oath that he is the senior partner of the linn of 
P.J. Cheney & Co., doiner business in the City of Toledo, County and State 
aforesaid, and that said firm will pay the sum of ONE Hl'N!>ftED 
DOLLARS for each and every case of Catarrh that cannot be cured by the 
use of Hall's Catarrh Cike. „„ 

FRANK .T. CHENEY. 

Sworn to before me and subscribed in my presence, this Cth day of 
December, A. D. i886. 

( "" 1 A. W. OLEASON, 

-J seal i Aotary l'ulrfic.^ 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally and acts directly on the blood and 
mucous surfaces of the system. Send for testimonials, free. 

F. .1. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 
t)S> Sold by Druggists, 75c. 
Hall's Family Pills are the best. 

Tub improved machinery and the expert workmen employed by 
the Spauiding Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, have 
done away with the horrors of carpet cleaning. Many persons put 
up with dirty carpets just because they dread the process of renova- 
tion and cleaning. At the Spauiding establishment the work is done 
with dispatch and thoroughness, and old soiled and dusty carpets 
are made to look like new. 



People taking up their residence in the country for the summer 
can be supplied with suitable crockery and glassware of moderate 
ices, at S. & G. Gump & Co., 113 Geary street. 




Wnich have 



you an eye to, 

quantity or quality, when 
you l'ti\- something in 
make washing easy ? If it's 
quality, you want Pearl- 
ine. In effectiveness, 
in economy, ami above 
ail in its absolute harmlessness. no matter 
how in- where yon use it. there's nothing to 
compare with this, the first and only washing- 
compound. \\ hat difference does the quantit^y 
make, after all? If yon spend five cents or ten 
cents or a dollar for an aid to washing, don't you 
want the thing that will give you the most work, 
the best work.and the most certain safety for that 
amount of money ? That thing is Pearline. <«< 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in." 



—Dr. Subady, 274 Lexington avenue, New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 

Send for Pamphlet, 418 Sacramento Street. 

I. Dedtch, Proprietor. Telephone Main 5M4 

Crystal Palace 

5 Kearny street, 12 Geary street, 
Choice Wines and Liquors. 

J. B. Pon. 



, S. F., Cal. 



Pibrbb Cabbbbb, Pounder of Maison Tortonl. | C. Lalanne 

Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

A 15 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Francisco 
Lunch, 50 cts. Dinner, 75 cts. Also, a la carte. 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch_Whisky 

Importers - MACONDRAY & CO. 

Joseph Oillott's Steel Pens, ™ AWAJ M G0 . i« 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-18^. These pens are " the 
best In the world." Sole aeent for the United States, 
Mb. Hbnby Hoe, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

H. IsaaC JoneS, M. D. Eye. Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office— 23-1 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets. S. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 



Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Main 101. 



Weak Men and Women ^°t d earM D e a iTre™d"; 

it elves health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street San Francis co. Send tor circular. ___ 

C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS_^» 



No. 532 OLATT STREET, 3. F. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1823 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, iqoo. 




Pleasured 
Wand 

Qfeohwnowand but Measure's^ 

— Tom ^foort, *^b«sJU 




THREE new plays this week and a new notion of Car- 
men. The season is on with a will. First we will 
chat about the Zangwill play, which re-opened the Grand 
Opera House last Monday night and introduced the new 
Frawley company. As plays go, it is not a wonder. The 
first two of its acts are diffuse and inconsequential. They 
never seem to arrive at any effect. You see the Jews of the 
Ghetto in all sorts of comic exaggeration; you learn some- 
thing of how easy it was to be married in the old London 
Ghetto; you hear a deal of boasting and blathering from ec- 
centric characters. But there seems to be no vital purpose 
for anything or anybody. And while the two acts that fol- 
low are urgently dramatic, full of real meat, they do not en- 
tirely explain and forgive their predecessors. But in these 
last two acts there is a play by itself, and a remarkable 
character of a Rabbi that is played with nothing short 
of inspiration by Wilton Lackaye. Mr. Lackaye's per- 
formance is one to remember. Not since Svengali has he 
given us figure so perfect in portraiture. There are dig- 
nity, old-worlo honor, heart and music in his assumption. 
The character personifies Duty as an old man like this 
might see and know it. One cannot imagine a surer, 
truer reading of the part. Henry Roberts pitched him- 
self in a fairly human key as the young lover, and Miss 
Morrison was convincing enough, without being distin- 
guished, as the Rabbi's daughter. A telling bit of char- 
acter study was Wallace Shaw's in the role of an eccen- 
tric poet. It was to me weirdly fascinating. 
# # * 

And now The Tree of Knowledge which Henry Miller and 
his excellent company are presenting in sumptuous style 
at the Columbia. Usually in this column the play is the 
thing to be first considered, but even in a better piece 
than this one by Carton it would be hard to overlook for a 
moment such a cast. I think I may risk the superlative 
and call it a perfect cast, and a production that runs on 
glass. What with Morgan, Miller, Worthing and Walcott 
impeccable among the men, and Martinot, Anglin and 
Whiffin quite as good among their own sex, it would be 
hard indeed to over-praise the acting. 

TJie Tree of Knowledge is a pretty fierce number 
of what we are pleased to call the ultra worldly. 
It calls a spade a spade ; it reveals a thoroughly treach- 
erous and beastly woman. She has made a dupe of one 
man in the transient capacity of mistress. She has de- 
serted him, and the next he sees of her is when his bosom 
friend brings her home as a wife. Nigil Stanyon is the 
first dupe, Brian Hollingsworth the second, Loftus Rou- 
pelle, their friend, the third. Loftus, who is a bored 
worldling and a persistent cynic, elopes with her. They 
may live happily ever after, for all we know, for the 
author ends his play with neither retribution nor punish- 
ment. There is a strong scene where Nigil visits the 
woman, whose name is Belle, to break up the elopement, 
and in a flood of passion and disgust threatens to kill her, 
just as her husband returns home. Belle describes Nigil 
to her husband as the man who ruined her youth, and wh« 
now threatens to kill her unless she accompany him back 
to the old life. And Brian believes her, and a life-long 
friendship is shattered. But another chance comes when 
there is no Nigil at hand to spoil the sport, and she goes, 
and Loftus with her. Then the pieces are picked up and 
Nigil and Brian come together again, and Brian marries 
Monica, his mother's adopted daughter, whom he has 
loved and who has loved him this long time. 

The subject is handled without gloves, but it is rot vul- 
gar; there is no physical suggestion, nothing Saphoesque 
about the treatment. It is the wantonness of the woman's 
mind, rather than body, that is pictured; and in a flashy, 
epigrammatic manner well pictured. The character of 
the three young men, as well as the one of Brian's father, 
are drawn with sympathy and conviction; and the women 



are equally vived. Belle is presented with unflinching 
realism by Sadie Martinot. Worthing, although in a dif- 
ferent way, is as good as he was in The Tico Escutscluons 
as Loftus. He bandies the weariness and cynicism and 
wicked elegance of the part with consummate address. 
Morgan, in that quiet intensity of his, is just the fellow 
for Nigil. His work is almost as strong as it was in The 
Liars. And Miller as the husband invests his role with 
dignity and pathos that are not cheap. We laugh as a 
rule at the ill-used husband — I don't know just why, but 
we laugh. Nobody laughs at this man, not even Loftus. 
That fine old veteran, Charles Walcott, gives a vigorous, 
artistic personation of the father. Mrs. Whiffen, as ever, 
is uncompromisingly good as a full-hearted woman of ma- 
ture years. Miss Anglin as Monica plays with that sweet 
naturalness we have learned to admire in her. Her part 
is not a robust one, and she, Anglin-like, does not attempt 
to play it for more than its value; but what there is of it 
she presents with delightful art and personality. 

* # * 

Hoyt's last farce, A Day and a Night, is a vulgar little 
plotless thing that depends entirely on the specialties the 
Dunne and Ryley comedians are putting into it. It is al- 
leged to be a satire on life behind the scenes, but I don't 
believe it. There is nothing but pure tenderloin — except 
one character of the old stage doorkeeper, played with ex- 
ceptional skill by Walter Jones, and the specialties. Mat- 
thews and Bulger have some new oddities in the way of 
talk and business; Louise Gunning and Mary Marble 
handle the songs easily, and Norma Whalley looks a 
beauty. That is about the only thing she can do on the 

stage. 

* * # 

Carmen at the Alcazar is not offensive, and Miss Roberts 
in her heart-to-heart way is not a bad Carmen. She is 
not the right Carmen, but in her own soft way she does 
very well; and Mr. Whittlesey is a quite strenuous person- 
ity as Jose. 



The sixth week of Dunne & Ryley's season of Hoyt 
farce comedy will be inaugurated at the California Thea- 
tre to-morrow evening with Hoyt's A Conttnttd Woman. 
Norma Whalley will appear in the principal role. Others 
in the cast will be J. Sherrie Mathews as "Benton 
Holmes," whose wife is a candidate against him for the 
Mayoralty of Denver; Harry Bulger as "Boyle Doyle," 
proprietor of the principal Denver refreshment parlors; 
Bessie Tannehill, as "Aunt Jim," an earnest advocate of 
woman's rights; Tony Hart as "Uncle Todie," Aunt Jim's 
other half, better or worse, as you choose; Walter Jones 
as "Van Dyke Beard," Holmes' butler, and Mary Marble 
as "Mary Peet," a lady's maid. Maud Courtney, Louise 
Gunning, Adele Estee, Ethel Kirwan, Phil Ryland, and 
twenty others, will play the remaining parts, and the four 
acts of the comedy will be crowded with specialties. 

# * • 

Beginning with Monday night the Henry Miller Company 
at the Columbia will lay aside the modern dress and take 
up the picturesque costume of the Louis XIV. period in 
Sydney Grundy's brilliant comedy of manners A Marriage 
of Convenience. This is the charming and interesting 
work brought out by Mr. Miller at the Baldwin Theatre 
season before last and it will be remembered that the star 
won no small amount of commendation for his portrayal of 
the leading role in the brilliantly written comedy. Follow- 
ing A Marriage of Convenience Mr. Miller will stage last 
season's great comedy success The Liars and will follow 
that with Heartsease, The Only Way, Brother Officers, His 
Excellency the Governor. 

* # * 

Smith & Fuller will present a novel musical sketch at 
the Orpheum next week. They are said to be clever per- 
formers, and all the instruments used are the inventions 
of the Smith cf the team. Stella Mayhew will present a 
specialty for which she has become quite famous within 
the past six months. Barrere & Jules are gymnasts who 
will exhibit their agility on parallel and horizontal bars. 
The Four Cohans will present another of George Cohan's 
pieces, Money to Burn. 



July 7, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 1.ETTEK. 



•1 enters on its third week at the Tivoli with a 
large advance sale of seats, indicating a succession of 
crowded houses. Of all the revivals of Thr OtMa which 
the Tivoli has given, it is generally admitted that the 
present one is superior in every respect. The company is 
stronger, the costuming and scenic effects more elaborate, 
while the chorus and orchestra could not be improved up- 
on. Edwin Stevens, Ferris Hartman, Georgie Cooper, 
Helen Merrill, Annie Meyers, Tom Greene, Grace Orr, 
Arthur Boyce and the balance of the cast are doing good. 
The final production of the comic opera season will be 
Wang, and then comes the grand opera season, the definite 
date of the opening of which will be announced in a few 
days. 

* • » 

Florence Roberts and White Whittlesey will do Camille 
next week at the Alcazar. They will be supported by a 
selected number of the Alcazar players and a beautiful 
scenic and costume production is promised this ever 
popular play which was born into the world in '56 and 
which has been played in nearly every tongue ever since. 
Camille will be followed by A Country Girl, by special 
permission of Ada Rehan. 

* * » 

The third act of Martha will be sung at Fischer's Con- 
cert House next week by Miss Amanda Corcoran, Mme. 
M. Morell, Charles Thrower, and John De Witt. Miss 
Isabelle Underwood will give new selections, Baby Dolli- 
yer will appear here for the first time, and Edison's Pro- 
jectoscope will show new moving pictures of the Afro- 
English war. 

* * * 

The first of the Burton Holmes Lectures is booked for 
the afternoon of Thursday the 19th iDst. at the Columbia 
Theatre. This lecture will be the first of Series A to be 
given on Thursday afternoons and following on Sunday 
night the first of Series B. 



NO USE.— ELWYN RVNQ HOFFMAN- 



It's no use now, I might as well 

Just quit the pen and take the plow ; 
I don't stand any show to win 

Fame as a story-writer now I 
The fellows who will get the pie, 

(And they are getting it, I see) 
Are they who with a pencil fought 

For Cuba and humanity. 

Who went to war, and marched, and camped; 

And camped and marched; and marched again. 
Who recklessly bestowed their lead 

On Uncle Sam as well as Spain! 

And now write up, in Boer-land, 

The bloodshed they have never seen — 
I never went to war, alas I 

I'm scorned by every magazine I 
Humholdt, Nevada, June 30, 1900. 



In London the opinion is general that the last has 

been heard of that brave but foolhardy Andreie, who set 
out to find the North Pole by means" of a balloon. The 
brother of the explorer does not, however, share this 
gloomy conviction, and in the course of an article in the 
New York Journal blithely states: "There is every reason 
to believe that my brother, S. A. Andree, is alive. We of 
his family hope and expect to hear of his appearance in 
North America before the end of the present summer. I 
am well aware that the scientific world has largely given 
him up as long since lost among the Arctic ice; but we 
have full confidence in the safe return of his expedition, 
and our faith is not unreasonable, as you shall see." May 
this fond fraternal hope be quickly realized 1 

If you want an exquisite luncheon, dinner or breakfast served and 
cooked in real Parisian style go to the Maison Riche at the corner of 
Grant avenue and Geary street. The Kiche has long been known as 
the epicure's paradise. It's name is a familiar one to the good livers 
of the world. 

The human skin is sensitive; bad cosmetics scar it. Camelline 
not only beautifies but soothes. It is used by Adelina Patti, Ellen 
Terry and Mrs. Kendall and thousands of others. 

If you want a healthy drink try Jesse Moore " AA" whiskey. 



G^ll-f^.-^;-, TU .4. Tlllt I'OITI.AB HOUSE 
aiiTornia I neatre. ■ u 



'■■Ujr, July Mil. 
Hnyl'. w.llli. -tl mtirr. 



i>r 'I'hon*. Malnini 
Only inntti.ro -*»* t,r<ln> 



A CONTENTED WOMAN 

F*roMDt«d bj I'm. 11. A Itylry'" ilftUU mat, fn. In. line Mntlliru* 

A- n.itirrr. Marj Marble, Wniirr Jonas. Norma wimilcy, Maud 

' oiirlii. \ . I ■■in-, Ounntnff, imd thirty other*. 

<'ur raffolaf popular p 
Next -AT '. \V CONEY lsl.AND. 

Columbia Theatre. OOTTU>Bl tSSSSruu^. 

Beginning Monthly, .Inly 9th. Ihir.l week of the season. Chart*! 
Frohmnn pTOMnU 

HENRY MILLER 

and u Bpeetal < oinpiiny. Fur six nights and Wednesday ami Sat- 
urday matinee*. Sydney Qnmdy'a brilliant oomedy of manner* 

A MARRIAGE OF CONVENI ENGE, 
with it* ploto.resQ.ue oostomeB of the Lonts XIV poriud. 
July lfith: THB LIARS. 
Julp 19th— First Burton Bolmes Lecture rnnllnce. 

T !./.«. I! O^* — — W— . ~~ Mas. Ernestine Krbiiho, 
J VOl I UPera riOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Crowded houses are witnessing the enormous comic opera suc- 
cess, 

THE GEISHA 

which begins its third week next Monday. 

Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Next production, the comic opera, WANG. 

Then comes the Grand Opera Season. 

Popular prices — 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



Orph 



eum. 



Smith A Fuller 
Berrere & Jules 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Stella Maybew 
Quaker City Quartette 



THE FOUR COHANS 

Clayton White and Marie Stuart, assisted by Miss Evh Randolph 
Todd-Judge Family Biograph 

Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10c.; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Fischer's New Concert House oviSdfst. 

Beginning- Monday, July 9th, K. A. Fischer, Proprietor. 

Tbirdactoi MARTHA, by the English Opera Quartette; Isa- 
bel Underwood ; Baby Dolliver ; Edison's Projectoscope, and 
Hinrichs' Unrivaled Orchestra. 
Admission, 10 cents; reserved seats, 25 cents: matinee Sunday. 

r\ I T L J. Bklasco & Thall, Managers. 

ttlcazar I neatre. Phone. Main 254 

Week of July 8th. Florence Roberts, supported by White 
Whittlesey, in a modern production of 

GAMILLE 

Alcazar Prices— 15c., 25o., 35o„ 50c. Only Matinee Saturday 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 

over. 




FARMYARD IN SUSSEX. Size, 20x15 inches. 

Copy of one of the premiums given for the return of 25 

QUEEN LILY SOAP wrappers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 




Library&able 




Problems Of Several magazine articles and addresses 
Expansion written and delivered at various times by 
Mr. Whitelaw Reid, ex-Minister to Prance, 
and a negotiator of the treaty of peace between America 
and Spain, have been gathered together and embodied 
consecutively, in the order of their several dates by C. 
C. Buel, assistant editor of the Century Magazine, who 
furnishes a brief prefatory note to the volume. As editor 
of one of the leading American newspapers, as a clear 
and vigorous thinker, and as a finished public speaker, 
Mr. Reid is admirably fitted to deal with the vexed ques- 
tions incident to the duty and policy of holding the 
Philippine Archipelago. In "Problems of Expansion," 
he strikes no vacillating note. On the contrary, in the 
first paper, "The Territory With Which We Are 
Threatened," he shows conclusively that under our Con- 
stitution we have a perfect right to plan for outside 
accessions, and that Article IV., Section 3 covers the 
whole ground. It reads: "The Congress shall have 
power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regula- 
tions respecting the territory or other property belong- 
ing to the United States." Mr. Reid's views in favor of 
expansion were plainly expressed at the White House be- 
fore the delegates to the Paris conference received their 
instructions from the President. In commenting upon an 
address of Mr. Reid's a foreign critic said: "The author 
is one man who knows what he thinks about the new policy 
required by the new situation in which his country is 
placed, and has the courage and candor to say it." Under 
the title "Our New Interests," is given the fine address 
delivered at the University of California on last Charter 
Day by Mr. Reid. Some of the titles of the several essays 
and addresses are: " The Duties of Peace," " The Open 
Door," "A Continental Union," "Our New Duties," etc. 
The foot notes and appendices also contain much valuable 
information. The latter include the Resolutions of Con- 
gress as to Cuba, the Protocol of Washington, and the 
text of the Peace of Paris. Many who will take an active 
part in the coming political campaign will be likely to 
turn to the pages of Mr. Reid's books for facts and argu- 
ments on the most vital topic of the day. 

Problems of Expansion: by Whitelaw Reid. The Century Co., Pub- 
lishers, New York. Price 81,50. 

For The Queen A half dozen stories of soldier life, the 
In South Africa, first beginning amid English college 
scenes, and many of them ending in 
Zululand where bugles sing the charges and Maxims and 
Martinis bark together, form the contents of a volume en- 
titled "For the Queen in South Africa," by Mr. Caryl 
Davis Haskins. In "Winning the Sword Knot," the find- 
ing of the body of the Prince Imperial is graphically des- 
cribed. There is no sadder story in history than 
that of the death of the brave young Frenchman, 
who, fresh from Woolwich, cast in his lot with the warriors 
of his temporary country, "thinking perhaps that through 
a cloud of Zulu assegais he could carve his way back to 
the throne of the great Napoleon." All the tales in the 
little volume are tales of bravery and are exceedingly 
well told. 

For The Queen In South Africa: by Caryl Davis Haskins. Little, Br. ,wn 
& Co.. Publishers, Boston. Price $1.00. 

The Knights of The second half of Henryk Sienkiewic?'s 
the Cross. stirring tale, "The Knights of the Cross," 
is now ready. The love story is carried 
along in a masterful way, and the reader learns what a 
noble of those days could do, if he bad a strong arm and a 
manful heart, with knightly eagerness for adventure. But 
there is more of bloodshed and battle, of storm and strife, 
than anything else in this tale of one of the most dramatic 
periods of the Slav world. How the Knights of the Cross, 
a German military order founded in Palestine in 1190, 
whose object was the subjection of Poland and Lithuania, 
and a boundless extension of German influence in eastern 



Europe, were finally crushed out at Tannenberg, is told 
by the Polish novelist in a thrilling, absorbing manner. 
Who can read unmoved of that dread defeat where forty 
thousand bodies lay on a blood-stained field in endless 
sleep? "In the air, which was bright from gleams after 
the setting sun, and purified by the rain, they could see 
distinctly the immense battle-field, steaming and bloody, 
bristling with fragments of spears, lances, and scythes, 
with piles of bodies of horses and men, amid which were 
thrust upwards dead hands and feet and hoofs; and that 
sad field of death extended, with its tens of thousands of 
bodies, farther than the eye could reach. Camp followers 
were moving about over that immense cemetery, collect- 
ing arms and removing armor from the dead bodies. But 
above in the ruddy air were storming and circling flocks 
of eagles, crows and ravens, screaming and croaking with 
delight at the food before them." 

It is all very realistic and full of strong pictures of the 
wild life of Poland and Lithuania in the fourteenth cen- 
tury. Mr. Jeremiah Curtin, who is really Mr. Sienkie- 
wicz's right hand, so far as the English-reading public is 
concerned, stands beside the great novelist— on bis left — 
in the print which adorns the title-page of the work which 
he has so ably translated. 

The Knights of the Cross: by Henryk Sienkiewicz. (Second Half). Trans- 
lated from the Polish by Jeremiah Curtin. Little. Brown & Co., Publishers, 
Boston. Price, $1.00. 

The Life of The seventh and last volume of "The 
Charlotte Bronte. Life and Works of the Sisters Bronte," 
(the Haworth edition) is devoted to 
"The Life of Charlotte Brontt," by Mrs. Gaskell. It has 
an introduction and notes by Clement K. Shorter. This 
new edition of an ever-popular biography, supplemented 
by the addition of new material, unknown to the original 
author, hitherto unpublished letters, and extracts from 
numerous works written by Miss Bronte's admirers, fill in 
several gaps in Mrs. Gaskell's singularly fascinating 
story, and make a memoir which seems an absolutely true 
picture of a melancholy life. The letters in which Mr. 
Bronte definitely requested Mrs. Gaskell to undertake a 
biography of his daughter, has only recently been un- 
earthed, and is an interesting contribution to the bio- 
graphy of the subject. Mr. Shorter in his introduction 
gives a brief sketch of the life of Elizabeth Cleghorn Gas- 
kell, better remembered as the biographer of Charlotte 
Bronte, than through a number of books written by her 
during a period of twenty years of literary labors. 

A carefully compiled index, some interesting illustra- 
tions, and a Bronte chronology, are valuable additions to 
a book that must give general satisfaction. 

The Life of Charlotte Bronte: by Mrs. Gaskell. Harper & Brothers, Pub- 
lishers, New York. Price, 81.75. 

"Stephen Decatur," by Cyrus Towcsend Brady, is the 
latest addition to The Beacon Biographies, edited by 
M. A. De Wolfe Howe. The photogravure used as a 
frontispiece is taken from a portrait by Sully, which hangs 
in the library of the United States Naval Academy at 
Annapolis. It is commonly believed to have been the 
study from which the Decatur medal was made in 1813. 
Small, Maynard & Co., Publishers, Boston. Price 75 cents. 

Books Received. 

Doubleday, Page & Co.: "Besieged by the Boers," E. Oliver 
Ashe, M. D , price SI. 25: "Spencer and Spencerisra," Hector 
Macpberson, price $1.25; "The Heart's Highway," Mary E. Wilkins, 
price $1.50. 

The Macmillan Co.: "World Politics," Paul S. Reinsch. Ph. D., 
I.. L. B., price $1.25; "As the Light Led," James Newton Baskett. 
price $1 50: "Voices in the Night," Flora Annie Steele, price $1.50; 
" Ladv of the Lake," Walter Scott, edited by Eliztbeth A. Packard, 
price 25 cents. 

Harper & Brothers: "As Seen by Me," Lilian Bell, price $1.25; 
"A Diplomatic Woman," Huan Mee, price$1.00. 

Tbe Century Co.: "China, the Long Lived Empire," Eliza Skid- 
more, price $2 50. 

Cassell & Co.: "The Wisdom of the Ancients and New Atlantis," 
Francis Bacon. (National Library Edition), edited by Prof. Henry 
Morley, price 10 cents, issued weekly. M. E. B. 



"This beats Paris I" exclaimed a globe-trotter the other night 
when for the first time he was entertained at the Cafe Zinkand. 
After the play is over everybody goes to Zinkand's to get the best of 
wines, beers and sappers and to listen to the inimitable music. 



July 7, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



U 



1 



|i.-. 



(Sown Crier 



ri 'X<*r the Crter? 'kfot toe devil art fAou t ' 
5 'Om th*t mftptejr ttxdtvtt,Mr. with you ' 



S. 



SCCOU NTS of injuries from firecrackers and kindred 
forms of tumultuous foolishness are not yet complete. 
Many people have been maimed, burned and crippled, 
fires caused, runaways started, and for what? There is 
no sense in the present form of celebration, no excuse for 
it, and it should be forbidden. The noise itself is a serious 
evil, particularly dangerous to invalids and nervous folk. 
No family possessing a whole boy on the morning of July 
4th has any assurance that it will have more than a few 
mussed-up fragments by night. Mothers are kept in an 
agony of apprehension, property owners tremble every 
time they hear a fire alarm. At the end of the riot every- 
body still alive draws a long breath and ejaculates: 
"Thank God!" And it would be so easy and commendable 
not to act like a parcel of lunatics. The parade Wednes- 
day gave a few peacockers a chance to bestride horses 
they did not know how to ride, forced a lot of tired men to 
take a weary tramp, and did nothing more. It is time 
that all this nonsense were abated. If the \merican peo- 
ple cannot celebrate a really important anniversary with- 
out going on exhibition as a lot of simples tbey ought to 
take a sleeping potion on the night of the third, s'rong 
enough to numb their notsenses until the morniDg of the 
fifth. 

CHIEF S'lllivan of the Police Department is going to 
have a bard time in weeding from the force its bullies 
and incompetents. Certainly a patrolman with too little 
stamina to remain sober while on duty is unfit to wear a 
uniform, and if while sober he is a beetle-browed imbecile, 
he is equally in need of dismissal. The act of Robinson 
and Schmidt in dragging from bed on the charge of bur- 
glary a ten year old boy, who could as well have been ap- 
prehended the next day, and of whose guilt no evidence 
appeared, was inexcusable. If the chief upholds it he 
will lose much of the public confidence he is beginning to 
win. As to the maudlin creature Ring, who absolutely 
without cause arrested a respectable woman, he should 
not alone be fired, but the husky sons of his victim would 
be justifiable in beating his hollow head off. 

FERHAPS the Goddess of Liberty business is all right 
for the sun-kissed interior, but here in San Francisco 
it should be forbidden by law. The local climate is not 
adapted to the display of scantily draped charms and is 
fatal to bare arms. Last year there was a radiant god- 
dess, whose nose was blue before she had ^one half the 
distance, and whose impressive figure was pricked with 
goose flesh from start to finish. She was good to look up- 
on until the weather reached her, and then the only senti- 
ment she excited was pity. Naturally, her experience 
brought on pneumonia, and she died. The price was too 
great to pay for the joy of being foolish. Several other 
girls were made sick by exposure, and some of them died, 
too. There should be a regard for women too tender to 
permit their being killed to make a Roman candle holiday. 

ftNOTHER private detective has been arrested for 
complicity in a crime of violence. In every com- 
munity the private detective is a greater menace to order 
than the transgressor on whose trail he is supposed to 
camp. In fact, in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred he 
is a rogue, his only real purpose to fatten on blackmail. 
The oftener crooked detectives shall be arrested, and the 
longer detained, the better. Many detective agencies 
here are never heard of except when exposed in collusion 
with law-breakers, or in some filthy task of collecting evi- 
dence for an evil purpose. 

STILL the Supervisors are after the gamblers, and 
they ought to get them. If one sort of gambling is 
to be tabooed, every sort ought to be. There is nothing 
fair in stopping square faro and letting brace games of 
poker loot the pockets of Suckerdom. 



SINCE the Santa ¥6 has begun running through trains 
both the Examiner and Bulletin have acquired the 
habit of nagging the corporation. They must excuse the 
public for forgetting their high moral plane and wonder- 
ing mildly what they asked for and failed to get. They 
display exactly the spirit that discourages investment of 
capital, and hampers the growth of San Francisco. The 
habit of abusing the Southern Pacific has become chronic, 
and there is no hope that it will be any whit changed 
when the heavens shall roll up as a scroll, but it is a habit 
that ought not to spread itself so as to embrace every 
new enterprise. There are other railroads with designs 
of reaching the coast, and they won't be hurried a little 
bit by the prospect that abuse awaits their enterprise. 

« STRANGE contest is in prospect between the Salva- 
tion Army and the Volunteers of America. Both of 
these organizations are engaged in saving souls. Ac- 
cording to the teacher they are supposed to follow, no 
thought of money should enter into their deliberations. 
They have no right to do anything with property beyond 
selling it and giving the proceeds to the poor. Yet the 
contest is over money, left by a wealthy woman in such a 
manner as to create doubt as to which holy gang was in- 
tended to be the beneficiary. The proper course for each 
would be to resign in favor of the other, and prove that 
the valuation placed upon treasure in Heaven is not a 
bluff. If both refuse to receive the dross it might be de- 
voted to some useful purpose. 

"TDECAUSE he loved her" one Al. Moody, a person of 
D no particular account, shot Mrs. Lulu Roylance and 
then made a bluff at killing himself. Mrs. Roylance in ad- 
dition to other indiscretions had been guilty of becoming 
reconciled to her husband, to the discomfiture of Moody. 
The excuse given by the assassin lacks merit; it has been 
used too often, and when new was simply an indirect form 
of the insanity plea. To shoot in token of affection is neither 
natural nor to be tolerated. What Moody needs to cure 
him of his homicidal impulses, diagnosed by himself as the 
emotion of love, is a five-foot drop. Creatures of his stamp 
cannot be hanged too quickly. Living tbey are worse 
than useless, and knowledge that they are dead gives a 
sense of peace and security. 

ST Santa Ana the presence of the Fourth was empha- 
sized by the kerplunk of an aeronaut's impact with the 
earth after a fall of 500 feet. The man who goes up in a 
balloon courts death. When he tumbles he but undergoes 
the finish he invited. There is no utility in sailing hap- 
hazard among the clouds, and the person doing it leaves a 
small gap in the industrial or intellectual world when he 
drops. Still, death is ever a tragedy, and it is a pity 
people desire to witness shows where the possibility of a 
bloody and sickening episode is the real attraction. 

SLL is not joy that falls to the lot of the newspaper 
proprietor. Here is the Examiner that does not be- 
lieve in free silver, but is forced to uphold it; the Chron- 
icle, a strong partisan of free silver, forced to denounce it 
as a fallacy, and the Call, proclaiming its hatred of Bryan- 
ism, yet taking exactly the Bryan view of expansion. All 
three will battle mightily for principles in which they do 
not believe, and whoop it up for men whom, in the depth 
of their editorial hearts, they would be glad to see de- 
feated. 

BEVERLY BOTKIN, noted chiefly as the son of his 
mother, got in jail by reason of firing crackers and 
abuse. The knowledge that Beverly was strongly inclined 
towards idiocy, with other annoying symptoms of degener- 
ation came to the part of the public who followed Mrs. 
Botkin's trial, and jail is a good place for him. The only 
fault to be found is that Beverlv in jail had to flock too 
much by himself, when the institution should have been 
fairly bulging with a multitude of his kind. 

IT is not well that the members of the California delega- 
tion should openly squabble. All their fighting ought 
to be in executive session with the keyhole plugged. They 
were not sent to Kansas City on a pugilistic tour, but to 
save their country and show the world how the Californian 
intellect shines. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 



m 

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I 






LiCckorMn 



triiirranRfaUAiHiK&tt 




Ora'ors on every stump, 
Cannon loudly booming— 
Will you vote for Billy B. 

Or will you vote for Mac? 
Everybody on the shout, 
Every eagle screaming, 
Politicians lifting planks 

Fit to break your back. 

Temperance spielers standing up, 
Preaching prohibition; 
Other fellows sitting down 

Drinking campaign beer. 
Some are yelling "We'll be saved 1" 
Others "Sure perdition 1" 
Isn't it a pack of fools 

Acting on the queer? 

Thus they'll rave for many moons, 
Yell like wild Apaches; 
Argue, swear, exonerate, 

Pacify and riot, 
Till the campaign fund is gone- 
Then they'll count their scratches, 
Pocketing their little jobs 

Strictly on the quiet. 



Roswell M. Field, brother of the late Eugene Field, who 
now fills the chair on the Chicago Evening Post left va- 
caut by the kindly humorist and poet, is a devoted ad- 
mirer of dogs. He has at his home in Buena Vista Park 
a collection of photographs labeled "Unknown Dogs of 
Well-Known People." This gallery is large and unique, 
and contains, amongst other pictures, several portraits 
of "Bully Boy," Wilton Lackaye's bull terrier, who is an 
actor-dog and will appear in an important role in The 
Dancing Girl next week. "Rose" Field owns two dogs 
which were well beloved of the late "Gene," who embalmed 
them in verse, and they are therefore listed under the 
head of "objects of interest" in Chicago. They are called 
"Johnny Jones" and "Sister Sue." Last winter there 
appeared one day in the letter rack of the Herald Square 
Theatre an envelope bearing the address "Bully Boy, 
care Lackaye." Inside there was a card like this: 



Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Jones 
Buena Vista Park. 



And seven little ones : 



Yum Yum 

Jones 



Ko Ko 
Jones 



W. H. T. 
Jones 



Pooh Bali 
Jones 



Also 
Jones 



Besides 

Jones 



Still 

.lone.s 



This was a formal announcement after the well-known 
dog-fashion of a new canine family. "Bully Boy," who is 
a sad dog anyway, replied with the following doggerel, 
which is de rigmeur on such occasions : 

" Bully Boy congratulates John Jones of sons: and Btory, 
That Mrs. J. wrings from the Fates a matron's crowning glory. 
He covets not your fame nor dame; but ah I the thought is bitter- 
He isn't literary, and he hasn't 'ary litter!" 

# * # 

Never, in all its history, has Telegraph Hill shone so 
resplendently. The old building on the top, known as the 
Observatory, looks positively gorgeous in a bran-new coat 
of whitewash, which covers it from top to toe. The tower, 
built in imitation of an ancient castle, battlements, tur- 
rets, and all, is visible from most parts of the city, whilst 
it serves as a landmark to the mariner entering the har- 
bor. The stranger passing through the Golden Gate won- 



ders how a modern city like San Francisco came to possess 
such a fine specimen of medieval architecture, and it is 
only on closer acquaintance that he is undeceived. Origi- 
nally the building was intended for a beer hall and pleas- 
ure garden, but San Fraocisco proved too lazy to climb 
the hill, even with the promise of cool lager and a magni- 
ficent panoramic view as a reward. Then an athletic 
club tried to run the place as a gymnasium, but the hoo- 
doo on the structure proved too much for them. Since 
then the Observatory has been unoccupied, and was rap- 
idly falling into decay, when Gray Brothers, the well- 
known contractors, took it in hand and converted it into 
a boarding house for their quarrymen. The coat of white- 
wash, as a finishing touch, was a positive inspiration, and 
the city owes the firm a debt of gratitude. 



The clubs have got hold of a good story about a cer- 
tain clever comedian who is a very much married man, 
and thoroughly domesticated. He returned home lately 
after a somewhat lengthy absence, and as his wife was 
confined to her bed, he volunteered to undertake the pleas- 
ing parental duty of hearing bis little girl say her pray- 
ers. The child got along all right until she came to the 
tag, which had been somewhat extended during her 
father's absence. It ran: "Please, God, bless mamma; 
please, God, bless little Bobby; please, God, bless the new 
baby; please, God, bless pussy." 

" Is there nothing else?" asked the father, somewhat 
hurt that the cat should take precedence over him in the 
matter of heavenly favor. 

"Oh, yes," gasped the girl; "I clean forgot you. And 
please, God, do bless papa, and make him a good actor, 
for Jesus Christ's sake. Amen I " 



■ Longest leased wire in the world 1 " 

So rings the Examiner's clarion horn 
In headlines louder far than sound 

That smite us in the eye each morn. 

And as we scan those startle heads 
Our wonder is at once increased; 

If it 's the " longest in the world," 
How can it be "the leased ? " 



Edna Wallace Hopper and Lord and Lady Francis Hope 
occupied a stage box during Tuesday evening's perform- 
ance of A Day and a Night. Walter Jones of the Dunne 
& Ryley Company, had known Lady Hope in the good old 
days when she was plain May Yohe. During the first 
entr'acte, in all the soil and make-up of "ihe doorkeeper," 
he slipped out the entrance from the stage to the audi- 
torium, parted the curtains with his hoary head, and said, 
"Hello, May, old girl, how are you?" 

"Bully, Walter. How's yourself?" came the reply. 
"Let me introduce my husband, Lord Francis Hope." 

"Hello, Frankie," said Jones; "glad togreetyou." And 
be extended a paw covered with stage dirt lhat Lord 
Francis obediently grasped. By this time the audience 
was "on," and the first real laugh of the nisht was won. 

To all appearances she is the same May Yohe. I no- 
ticed that she chewed gum straight through the perform- 



This comes to me all the way from New York: 

Henry E. Dixey was on Broadway again the other day, 
looking brown as a berry and fit as an athlete after his 
month's sojourn at White Plains. 

" Well you are looking fine," remarked a friend. "What 
does Muldoon feed you on?" 

"Chicken," replied t Dixey, sententiously, "only he 
doesn't know it yet. You. see, next season in 'The Ad- 
ventures of Francois,' I am to play a thief, so just by way 
of getting into training for the part I steal one of Mul- 
doon's chickens every morning, and get the cook to broil 
it for me on the sly. I have accomplished the remarkable 
feat of eating thirty chickens in thirty consecutive days." 

"And you still like them?" 

"Yes, — and better still, the chickens like me. Why, 
when I sneak into the hen-house now they all cackle: 'I 
wish I was in Dixey.' " 



July 7, 1900. 



SAN IK \\ CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



G/>e FOOL AND THE 

FOURTH 0/ JULY 

Br REGINALD 8CMUYLER. 

THERE are many kinds of Fourth of July fools, but the 
biggest of the bunch is the fell'iw who stays in town on 
Independence Day. I was a Fourth of July fool this year; 
I stayed right here where the fire crackers cracked, the 
jagger jagged and the poor paraders paraded. Now, noise 
and drunkenness are neither patriotism nor fun; they are 
simply noise and drunkenness. 

To say that San Francisco was drunken the day and 
night of Wednesday, July 4th, 1900, is only a mild state- 
ment of the condition. It was paralysed, foolish drunk; 
it was rough, tough and insulting; it boomed, spattered 
and rang with obscene sounds; it was sick at its stomach 
in the public thoroughfares. Thus was the spunk of our 
forefathers honored. The only people who did not make 
asses of themselves were the firemen — they had work to 
do in plenty saving the property and perhaps lives that 
their more patriotic brethren had placed in danger. 
Our star-spangled police, headed by the new chief in rai- 
ment louder than the loudest bomb of the day, of course 
turned out for dress parade at a time when every police- 
man in the town should have been on duty. This is an- 
other grand old custom of ours. A pathetic young woman 
posed as something liberty-like on an uneasy automobile; 
the soldiers marched wearily and the bands played in any 
tempi but the right one. It was a sorry sight. 

Holidays that pretend to be formal celebrations of some- 
thing but in reality are only an excuse for a general strut 
and drunk ought to be abolished. If we cannot observe 
them with some token of decency we ought to forget them. 
Christmas, New Years, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of 
July, even Decoration day, are made into nothing but or- 
gies by the mass of the people. Is it any wonder that re- 
spectable folk fly to the seaside, the mountains or the sub- 
urban inn at such times. If the noise were real enthu- 
siastic noise, if the drunkenness were spontaneous, there 
might be some excuse. But these "celebrations" of ours 
are deliberate, cold-blooded. They mark the few days in 
the year in which the hoodlum is safe from the police, 
when the painted lady may rub her rouge all over the 
town with absolute impunity. And so I say a fellow is a 
fool to stay in town. Here in California we have every 
facility for getting away, and all sorts of happy places to 
get to, places to please the purses and the tastes of the 
poorest as wei) as the richest of us. We have a summer 
that lasts practically the year round. And yet how few 
of our people out of the whole population enjoy these ad- 
vantages. 

We stick to the grime and hustle of the city, send our 
womenfolk away a couple of weeks during the year, and 
consider our duty done. The only crowd that really makes 
a practice of living like human beings is the society 
crowd. They have in recent years learned to appreciate 
open air and the free, open Country, riding, driving, and 
the sports that help keep men and women healthy and 
normal. Industry is a virtue that easily becomes a dis- 
ease, especially in San Francisco where we have no suf- 
fering summer season that absolutely drives us out of 
town. We peg away at our business for almost twelve 
months out of the twelve, and we have the greatest col- 
lection of nervous diseases in the world. We brace up on 
alcohol and tobacco, sometimes on drugs. We go the pace 
that fills. We drink cocktails before instead of wines 
with dinner; we make a nervous vice of the delightful 
solace of tobacco. We are too strenuous, too strained; 
we have no repose. We pay a terrible price for our 
riches and apparent prosperity; and we don't know how 
to celebrate the Fourth of July— at least not many of us, 
and I am writing of the conduct of the many. What San 
Francisco needs is a closed season for work. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

.Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 
746 Market street, San Francisco. 

Fob family use Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey is a prime favorite, 
nd in thousands of homes it is always on the buffet. 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 



The Organizers of the 

OPHIR OIL CO., 

Have arranged with the CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST COMPANY to hold sufficient securities in trust for the 
purchasers of Ophir Oil Stock to INSURE HOLDERS OF THIS 
STOCK AGAINST LOSS. 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Company shall fail to produce oil 
in paying quantities sufficient to bring its stock to par value (one 
dollar per share), purchasers will receive back, with accrued interest 
THE ENTIRE AMOUNT PAID IN BY THEM FOR STOCK. 

The securities thus held in trust are adequate, and an investment 
in Ophir Oil Stock is as secure as a United States Government bond, 
and vastly superior to deposits in Banks of Savings, for the reason 
that it combines 

Absolute Security with 
immense possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "reading between the lines" in this 
proposition. Whatever happens to the Ophir Oil Company your 
investment is safe. You cannot lose. Only a limited amount of 
this SECURED STOCK is ottered for sale. While it lasts it can be 
had for 

75c. per Share 

Fully paid and non-assessable. Sold only in blocks of $600 and up- 
ward. Common stock, unsecured, can be had at FIFTY CENTS 
per share in certificates of twenty shares and over. 

OPHIR OIITCOMPANY. 

Room 14, Fifth Floor, Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 
Represented in San Francisco by J. P. MASSIE. 



\ - 

1 


'■■ :k 




1 


IJP^ai 


lHuSlH 



Modern- 

NOB HILL FLAT 

1011 CALIFORNIA ST., Near Mason, 
Opposite Flood Mansion. 
11 rooms, 2 bath rooms, large laundry, coal 
bunkers, inlaid floors in drawing room, un- 
surpassed view north and south. Four min- 
utes' ride from Kearny street, six minutes 
from Market street. Rent. $100. Will lease 
to responsible parties. Apply to 

Q. A. BERTON, 323 Montgomery St. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending June 80, 1900, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, July 2. 1900. „ . , 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 
' Office: 83Post street. San Frauoieoo, Cal. * 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the terra ending June 

30. 1900, at the rate of three and one-auarter UlU) per cent per annum on all 

Deposits, free of taxes, and payable on and after July 2, 1900. Dividends 

not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 

from andafter July 1, 1900. _ ,, 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 




The valuation of mining property has in the 
Mining Crooks past been left very much to the sweet will 
as Promoters. °f the gentleman selling it, and the pro- 
moters who expect to fatten on the deal. 
The question has more often been, "What will it stand?" 
rather than what is it worth. The public has been prac- 
tically a dead letter in the bargain. Some wind inflated 
individual self-dubbed a mining engineer puts his name to 
a lot of estimates, and the "talent" swallows the ligures 
on the strength of a name, and puts up the money. Nine 
times out of ten they have been buncoed, but that does 
not matter much; of fools a new crop is continuely coming 
forward. A well baited hook always catches the gudgeon, 
and the bigger the liar the more valuable becomes the 
class of expert upon whom the wily promoter depends. 
Rascal always trains with rascal, and this fact was estab- 
lished long before Solomon and Shakespeare suggested 
the proposition that a man's character can always be told 
by the company he keeps. Given one scaly rascal in the 
mining business and twenty others of the same calibre 
will be found grouped about him. The one will always 
readily establish a character for his fellow scoundrel, and 
it costs the unfortunate investor some good hard coin of 
the Republic before he is convinced that lie has been asso- 
ciating with a band of thieves. All that one requires to 
do to substantiate this line of reasoning is to take 
the back trail and review the beginning and the 
end of innumerable transactions of the kind. Invari- 
ably it will be found that the men who followed the ex- 
pert (?) and his employers have been swindled, their money 
passing over to some scoundrel in the combination, who 
by its possession is placed in a position to play "gentle- 
man" and mix with respectable people, who could never 
believe, you know, that the nice Mr. So and So could be a 
thief — a rascal veneered with the proceeds of theft. Times 
are changing, however, very fortunately for the specula- 
tively inclined. It is not so easy to hoodwink people, while 
it is almost impossible to keep the list of promoters clear 
of names which have been tainted with some glaring ras- 
cality in the past, the latter in itself a sufficient warning 
to give the proposition a wide berth upon the grounds of 
suspicion if nothing more definite appears. 

In dealing with the subject of The Value 
How To Value f Mines the Mining Reporter of Denver 
Mining. Property, in a recent timely article says: "A 

mine is worth what it will produce above 
cost of its operation. Some will contend that a mine is 
worth what it is expected to produce, but this amount 
should be decreased by a charge sufficient to 
cover the risk of failure to come up to ex- 
pectations. A property which may be rented for 
$5,000 per year is worth $50,000. A mine which will earn 
a profit of $5,000 per year is worth $50,000, provided its 
promise of continuously producing this sum is as good as 
the business property. If the promise of larger or richer 
ore bodies justifies a faith In larger returns, then the 
mine is worth more than its present producing capacity 
would indicate. A mine has a larger prospective value 
than other real property. The value of a mining prospect 
is all prospective— conservative men pay $10,000 per acre 
for land in the Cripple Creek district, the value of which 
is entirely prospective. The prospective value of every 
prospect Increases as development work proves that the 
hope which led to this development work was well founded. 
A well-located prospect in the Cripple Creek district is 
worth $10,0110 per acre. The Independence mine sold for 
a sum in excess of the value of its measured ore bodies, 
or about $50,000 per acre for its entire holdings. It has 
been reported recently that the Portland management bad 
refused an offer of $40,000,000 for the Portland mine. 
This report is hardly to be credited, but if true it would 
represent a prospective value in the mine of something 



like 132,000,000 or $140,000 per acre, for its entire hold- 
ings, and $500,000 per acre for what is supposed to be its 
most valuable acreage. But the prospective value is al- 
ways based on a well-founded belief that the mine under 
proper management can be made to produce a good return 
upon the price, without decreasing the value of the 
original investment. The value of a mine is not fixed by 
rules so very different from those applying to the valua- 
tion of other property." 

In professional parlance the recent riffle in 
The Late wheat was a "blow out." A rumor of 
Wheat Deal, drought in an out of the way quarter, which 
could in no event cut any figure in annual 
results, was the tinder applied to start a flame in- 
creased in volume by the efforts of a few scared shorts, 
the blaze still further stimulated by a rush of purchases 
by the talent, which always gets in on top prices, only to 
expire with fitful flash, fading away to smoking embers 
as the hungry desire to fill up died away. This town was 
caught napping as usual, and the stories about numerous 
fortunes being cleaned up, ranging from $750,000 into the 
millions, are simply buncombe, dished up at so much a 
yard for the delectation of that portion of the public 
which reads but never thinks, and which swallows any- 
thing in the form of a yarn from the three-legged, bearded 
lady from Provence to the card-playing pig. The only 
clean-up of any magnitude was the $150,000 riffle made by 
an estate which bad a lot of bold-over wheat, and sold it 
very sensibly through its agent at the advance. How- 
ever, possibly narratives of the kind are good from the 
standpoint of inspiration for gamblers now budding in 
Pauper Alley and its numerous bucket shop attachments. 
Further than that, it offers an opportunity for investiga- 
tion in unravelling the mystery surrounding the where- 
abouts of a new crop of millionaires, furnishing work for 
the large army of unemployed which now haunts the 
vicinity of the Exchanges, where business has almost 
flattened out to the line invisible. 

The Black Spider mine near Keswick has 
A Shasta Mine been closed down temporarily, the man- 
Closed Down, agement says. The property is largely 
owned among the religious sect known as 
Seventh Day Adventists, and is managed by a board of 
directors made up of San Francisco business men. The 
ore so far taken out has been sold to the Copper Moun- 
tain people at Keswick. The management is accredited 
with the statement that the mine will start up again in 
a few months. 

The Ophir Oil Company, whose advertise- 
Seourity tor ment appears in another column, has adopted 
Investors. a P' an for the disposition of its stock whereby 

the investor is guaranteed against loss. The 
organizers of the company, who are among the best-known 
successful business men of the State, deposit securities 
with the California Safe Deposit and Trust Company to 
the full amount invested by the purchasers of stock, and 
in the event of failure to create a dividend-paying prop- 
erty, these securities become the property of the stock- 
holder. As they bear interest only a trifle less than that 
at present paid by savings banks, and the stockholder is 
allowed several years to determine whether he prefers to 
retain the stock or the securities, there is no investment 
on the market which offers so secure a plan to test the 
vast possibilities of profit to be derived from oil specula- 
tion. Naturally, no company can afford to guarantee a 
very large proportion of its stock, so that any one look- 
ing for an investment of this nature must necessarily 
make application for the desired amount without delay. 

The Bachelor's Oil Company, whose lands 
The Baoholor's are located on the east-side belt of Kern 
On Company. County, including Poso, Cotton and Kern 

districts, have a proposition which is meet- 
ing with a great deal of attention. Their lands are situ- 
ated inclose contiguity to valuable properties already de- 
veloped, and It appears that the Bachelor's stock will be 
in demand. The Bachelor's is both a land and drilling com- 
pany. It is capitalized at 200,000 shares; par value $1 
per share. It has no indebtedness, and is prohibited by 
its by-laws from incurring the same in excess of 5 per cent 
of its capital stock. It owns In fee simple outside of its 



July 7, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBWS LETTER 



»3 



other holdings 640 acres in the Poso land belt, and has re- 
tained experienced drillers to superintend the w 
boring its wells and the other necessary development work 
00 its several properties. 

There was little done on the mining 

The Stock market this week. Only two boardl 

Mcrkets Closed, were held, the balance of the week being 

observed as a holiday. The Stock and 

Bond Exchange closed on Saturday last, opening for the 

first time since then to-day. The oilmen also fell in line, 

showing that they do not believe in all work and no play 

as the best road to success. The mining people hope to 

astonish the natives with an elaborate programme on a 

new basis when they open up again. Politics may have 

the effect of dulling matters a little for a time, but the 

situation generally is brighter than it has been. 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 

Bid. 



Bid. 

American Liquid Air 

(loldcn Gate Beet Sugar 

Company 5 00 

SeaPowcr Co 



Sterling 

Sunset (oriirinkl 

Fri:-nrr-Alphft 

Mi. Diablo Oil Co 



Asked 
1 25 



1 20 

2 00 



ii' a 



Asked 

100 00 Suiiilary Reduction 

Nev. Co. Nnrrow Guilffe 

Railroad 14 GO 

25 00 Abbey Land Imp. Co 

22 so sum. I; it Co 

Oil Stocks. 

I 00 Grand Central 95 

50 Century 

75 Hie Panoche 

09% Tar Canyon 

Mixing Stocks. 

Argonaut 4 00 Brunswick 

Central Eureka 100 125 l-a Fortuna 2 50 

Drelsam :J5 Norton Sound 05 15 

Dutch .V) Victor Gold Mines 60 

N. Light iCape Nome) 12% Columbus Con 30 

Santa Roaalia ( Mexico) 40 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks I listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by 

Joseph B. Toplitz, Stock Broker. 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10, 330 Pine street. 



25 



When Greek Meets Greek. 



DIOGENES was putting a front knocker on his tub, 
when a maiden passed by, and then hesitated, and at 
length stopped. 

"What ho, Annides !" he said, pausing in his work. 

"I give you good day, Diogenes 1" she said, a pretty 
blush mantling to her cheek. 

''You are the first person I've seen this morning willing 
to give so much," he quoth. 

"Indeed, but you are welcome 1 No one in all the wide 
world is welcome to aught that I can give half so much 
as yourself." 

"And what do you know of the wide world, Annides ?" 
he asked her, springing on to the roof and sitting there 
cross-legged. 

"Nothing as yet but that it holds you and me, Dio- 
genes," she said, the blush mantling higher, and her bright 
eyes shaded by her lacework of lashes. Truly a pretty 
picture was she with her dress cut antique, so that her 
shapely leg on the off side peered through and told that 
as yet stockings and lingerie had not been invented. 

"Annides," he said. 

"Yes," she answered shyly. 

"You know me for a grumpy old man, don't you ?" 

"Oh ! not grumpy to me; only clever, and magnificent, 
and grand, and noble." 

"Enough. I see you know me. My pretty one, you 
have something to say to me." 

"I have," and she bent her head so low that he sprang 
from the top of his tub, and going to her, took her chiD, 
and, lifting it, kissed the full red lips, and then again, like 
one who knew the brand and appreciated it. 

"Tell me all, sweet one," he said. 

"That hcuse of yours," she began. 

"Well ?" he said encouragingly. 

"Two couldn't live in it," she said. 

"Halloa I" he cried tenderly. 

"But my father has a tub twice as big, and he has made 
it my marriage portion." 

Oh I Diogenes, oh I Annides. Halloa 1 halloa I halloa I 

Shorthand, typewriting; individual instruction; attention to 
orthography, etc., $5 per month. Typewriting done on short notice. 
214 McAllister street, Room 18, Telephone 276. 

After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Japan- 
ese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



For Rich 
and 
Poor 
Alike. 



Shares in 



La Zacualpa 

Rubber 

Plantation 

aie an investment with a 
profit Call and get our latest 
publication. 
" FACTS FOR INVESTORS." 

I'illed with interesting 
information regaiding rubber. 

703 Claus Spreckels Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Automobiles to we front 

The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 

The lightest, strongest cheapest and most durable. It climbs the steepen 
trades and is practicable on all kinds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants 

There (s an active demand for the company's stock. 

There Is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining 

A limited amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per share. Par value 910 
Full information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 



325 Parrott Building. San FranclBCO, Oal. 



S. GUODENOUGH, Secretary. 



Stocks 



Grain 



C. E. Mackey & Co. 

Investment Brokers 
32 Broadway New York 



Bonds 



Cotton 



San Francisco ^ m - ^^ Manage. 
Novelty Leather Co. 

Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladles' and Gents' 
Fine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sporting Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical. Surgical and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 94 

San Francisco 



Western Mutual Investment Go. *•••**"« 

$2 Per Month 
415-416 Safe Deposit Building, Montgomery and California streets, Son 
Franolsoo. Agents Wanted 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 




,--- . ^rȣF 



nsurance 




THE famous Committee of Twenty-seven has reported 
what is known as the Agreement of 1900. It is a lit- 
erary and insurance curiosity. It states that the com- 
mittee shall number thirty, they shall be selected by ballot, 
that it shall appoint its own officers, employ such assist- 
ants as may be required, expenses to be met by pro-rata 
assessment on the fire premiums of the subscribers de- 
rived from territory in the jurisdiction of the association, 
the general meeting of the companies signing the agree- 
ment is to be held in October, and quarterly thereafter. 
Article 1 is the consideration of rates. Article 2 is com- 
missions. Article 3, brokerage. Article 4, general and 
special agencies. Article 5, agents and restrictions. Ar- 
ticle 10, governs excepted cities, and Articles 13 and 14 
govern credits and accounts. In all cities and towns, 
save those excepted, agents shall not receive more than 
fifteen per cent on their premiums inclusive of brokerage 
or a flat commission of ten and of fifteen per cent contin- 
gent. No other compensation directly or indirectly in 
either case is to be allowed. In all cities agreed upon and 
specifically named to include only those of more than two 
thousand inhabitants, agents may receive not to exceed 
twenty per cent., or a flat commission of fifteen, and 
fifteen per cent, contingent, brokerage not in excess of 
ten per cent, shall be paid out of the agent's commission. 
Home office brokerage is also limited to ten per cent. An 
agent is defined as onn who holds the companies' commis- 
sion with power to bind. Any subscriber may appoint one 
salaried representative in one city paying all expenses in- 
cident to the carrying on of the business, but the ap- 
pointee shall not be permitted to act for any other com- 
pany. At the same time the subscriber may appoint in 
the same town or city another agent at the rate of com- 
mission herein provided. It seems that this is out of the 
frying pan into the fire, since the company will still be 
allowed to appoint a salaried representative at Milpitas 
and also a recording agent on commission. In the address 
of the President of the National Board, which preceded 
the call for the meeting, it showed that the loss ratio for 
1899, large as it was, only exceeded by one mill and one- 
tenth on each one hundred dollars the average for the 
last ten years, and says that we should be prepared to 
meet increased losses in future in one or both of the only 
two ways in which it can be done — increase in premium 
or decrease of expenses. The report of the committee 
with regard to the increase in premium seems to fairly 
well cover the ground, but with regard to decrease of ex- 
penses it appears to leave the situation in a worse condi- 
tion than it is at present. The appointment of "Salaried 
Agents" will always bring about friction. Insurance busi- 
ness, so far as agents are concerned, is a question solely 
of commission. The agent whose commission would ex- 
ceed his salary speedily wants an increase, and the agent 
whose salary exceeds his commission compels the company 
employing him to pay too much for their business. The 
idea of separation between companies representing a com- 
pany signing the agreement and a company outside, is 
provided for, and that advertising charges shall not be al- 
lowed for any other item except for calendars. The maxi- 
mum postage is limited to five cents for each policy issued, 
rent for desk-room is done away with, and re-insurance in 
any company not a member of the association is forbidden. 

# * * 

The average number of fire alarms rung in in San Fran- 
cisco is about fifty per month. On the 3d of July there 
were ten alarms and on the 4th there were fifteen alarms 
and one second alarm, which shows the arson proclivities 
of fireworks and firecrackers. 

# # * 

The most sarcastic thing that has been said for a long 
period is the Adjuster's Vale Baconiensis. It is as credit- 
able to the Adjuster in the point of sarcasm as it is hard 
upon the man for whom it is intended. 



An Accident Insurance Company reports 1224 claims 
for one month. Amongst them 132 were caused by falls 
of which 80 were the results of slipping on ice, 33 people 
slipped while lifting, 32 people fell down steps or stairs, 
32 were injured while handling heavy timber, 28 railroad 
men were knocked off trains, 27 railroad men were injured 
while coupling or uncoupling cars, 20 people were injured 
while getting on or off street cars, 25 people were caught 
in machinery, 23 were injured in railroad wrecks, 14 peo- 
ple stepped on nails, 16 people were thrown from horses, 
and 13 were scalded by steam or hot water. One man set 
fire to a celluloid cuff while lighting a cigar and collected 
$58.57; one man was bitten by a mule and sustained $45 
damages; two men were kicked by mules, with more 
damaging results, amounting to $50 each, and one man 
was hurt to the extent of $10 by tripping over a rug in a 

chapel. 

» « # 

The latest news in the London & Lancashire and Orient 
transactions is that Colonel William Macdonald assumes 
charge as Pacific Coast General Manager, with D. E. 
Miles as assistant manager, August 1st. 

A fire insurance trust is already in existence in Califor- 
nia. In the town of Monterey there were two agencies, 
one of which represented twenty-seven companies, the 
other of which represented twenty. Then both agencies 
got together and incorporated, and now it is supposed 
they will control all premiums in Monterey. 

The Manhattan Fire Insurance Company has re-insured 
the Erie of Buffalo. 

It is understood that a new fire company will enter Cali- 
fornia in the immediate future and be operated from a 
general agency which at present represents only one com- 
pany. 

Jasper Newton Patton, who up to a recent date and 
for nineteen years past has been secretary of the Pacific 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, died in Alameda last 
week. The deceased was a native of Ohio, and was fifty- 
five years of age. 

L. L. Bromwell, Pacific Coast Manager of the 
Milwaukee Mechanics, is spending with his family his 
vacation at Edgewoode. 

W. J. Gilliland of the Fidelity Mutual is in the southern 
part of the State. 

C. W. Mills, Manager of the Union Central Life Insur- 
ance Company wili remove his offices in the near future to 
the new building recently erected at the corner of Cali- 
fornia and Kearny streets where he will have elegant 
quarters, having leased the entire top floor. 

G. W. Spencer of the Aetna is in Montana on a business 
trip. 

The Liverpool and London and Globe has just held its 
sixty-fourth annual meeting. The increase of its business 
is shown by the fact that the premiums of 1899 exceed 
those of 1898 by almost $50,000. 



An Authoritative Statement. 
The well-informed physician will always name Moet & Cbandon 
White Seal when a patient seeks advice regarding the selection of a 
champagne.— United States Health Reports, Washington, D. C. 

Don't start on your journey without putting a bottle of Jesse 
Moore "AA" in your grip. 




Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

LONDON ASSURANCE, capital paw up 2.241.375 

Assets 19,105,145 

Capital Subscribed (5 000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. capital paw up 500.000 

Assets 2,602.060 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker BcrLDIHO. Ban Franolsco. Cal. 



July 7, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



»3 



WHERE NATURE 

HOLDS FULL SWAY. 



WHEN I drove through Lake County a few months ago I 
thought the loveliest part of California had been vtalted, 
but the trip from Tahoe to Rubicon Springs beats all. 
The drive is over the Sierras: "125 feet at the summit is 
the highest point reached. Several pretty lakes, some 
thick with pond lilies, water the way, and after two hours' 
drive the first sight is had of Rubicon Valley. Down a 
grade for several miles with a descent of over 1500 feet 
the scenery is beyond description. Much of it is like that 
one finds iu the Yellowstone Park. Immense rocky cliffs 
in varied hue, with snow drifts here and there in the moun- 
tains; stately pine trees and gigantic boulders make the 
whole wonderfully beautiful. After two and tbreequar- 
ter hours' drive Rubicon Springs is reached. The place 
is situated in a canon, or, you might say, a basin. There 
are a hotel and a number of cottages, all built of hewn 
timber and boards, evidently on account of the expense of 
securing finished timber, but they are comfortable. Run- 
ning by the hotel is the Rubicon River, the most beauti- 
ful of any stream I have ever seen. For two miles we 
rowed up this stream — the water as smooth as glass and 
the reflections in it more vivid than in a mirror. A'ong 
its banks are any number of ferns, immense rocks and 
trees. 

The strangest thing is to see an immense pine growing 
out of the solid rock. This is most common all through 
the mountains here. A hundred yards from the hotel is a 
mineral spring that has any number of good medicinal 
qualities, and together with the delightful climate, con- 
spires to give one an appetite that would break an ordi- 
nary landlord. However, the cooking is good and there 
is plenty, so we have no fault to find. There is another 
mineral spring about a mile from the hotel. The walk to 
it is through a grove of pines and a marvelous meadow, 
and the scenery — well, Yosemite is no grander. It is a 
wonder to me how a place so endowed with natural beauty 
is not raved over. It will be when it becomes better 
known. Everything all the way from Tahoe is beautiful 
and green. You can smell the green in the air, so 
pungent, cool and invigorating is it. One thinks of other 
people in other places that are dry and brown at this sea- 
son, and one is glad to have picked out the right spot. 

Malcolm Douglas. 

Rubicon Springs, July 4, 1900. 

Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup " for your 

children while teething 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital. J2.25O.0OO Assets, Jl0.984.248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street. 9. F. 




Life Insurance Co. 

of California 

Paid Policyholders, $11,000,000 
Kilgarif & Beaver, General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Voost, General Agent Aooident Department, 
Pacific Mutual Building, S. F, 



The Pacific Mutual 

(Organized 186S.) 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND IN8URANCE 

FIREMAMS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 

PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER. ENGLAND 

80LID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON. Manager. 439 California street, 8. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Founded A. D. 1702 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth Amer 



ica 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital „ J3.000.0O0 

Surplus to Policy Holders J5.O22.0KI 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent. 412 California street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Dp. J3,446,100 Assets. J24.034.U0.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. J9.612. 455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital, JB, 000, 000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent. City Agents. 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence- Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital 81,000.000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869.451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent. 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital J6.700.000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, $3,000,000 Gross Assets. 912,808,395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, 87,631.926 
II, L, Rofit, General A (rent ; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents, 

210 Sansome St. . San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the insur- 
ing publie, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment of Losses 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N, SCHLE8INGBR, City A*ent 804 Montgomery fltrwt Sap Francisoo 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 7, 1900. 




^gy^^^ 



'Personalis 



m 



I 



The Bachelors' Club are not the only people in the 

universe who do not pant for the distinction of entertain- 
ing that exceedingly imprudent gentleman, the Duke of 
Orleans. The Washington Post publishes a despatch from 
Paris which sets out that the King of Belgium has abso- 
lutely declined to permit him to establish his residence in 
his dominions. The King of Italy has also turned an 
equally deaf ear to his applications for permission to make 
his headquarters at Turin, where he wanted to buy a 
palace, while the Emperor Francis Joseph will not hear of 
his living permanently at either Vienna or Pesth. In fact, 
he is spurned by every one, and so profoundly chagrined 
is his father-in-law, Archduke Joseph of Austria, by the 
situation, that he has announced his intention of building 
a home for the duchess— not for the duke — near Fiume. 
No wonder, then, the Duke clings to his membership of 
the Bachelors' I It may soon be the only gentlemanly 
refuge left to him — if it doesn't promptly erase his name 
from its books. 

The mere fact that one is a member of the House 

of Commons does not necessarily imply that one squanders 
wealth with a hand that is lavish, as many confiding con- 
stituents have learned after an election to their pain. 
Thus there was no general panic when it was announced 
that the Kitchen Committee had decided to organizp a 
shilling dinner for thrifty legislators. Curiosity merely 
turned on what the meal would consist of, and it was 
found it would include a cut off the joint ad libitum, 
potatoes and vegetable also ad libitum, and as much bread, 
butter, and cheese as the diner desired. "The curious 
thing, however," remarks the Liverpool Courier, "is that 
it is not the poorer members who avail themselves of the 
dinner. There are millionaires in the House of Commons 
to whom the prospect of a plain meal which they can get 
without the trouble of thinking about the menu is a great 
attraction, and they are to be found among the best 
patrons of this economical dinner." 

At a certain hotel where Jerome K. Jerome was 

once staying, the lift-boy was in the habit of losing things, 
and requesting his passengers to make up the deficiency. 
He informed Mr. Jerome that he had lost his last shilling, 
which had rolled down a drain, and besought his advice as 
to the best way of recovering the coin. Mr. Jerome put 
his hand in his pocket, and then withdrew it — empty. 
"If 1 were you," he said, thoughtfully, "I would go down 
the drain after it." 

That reminds us of another lift-boy who once asked Mr. 
Robert Barr to lend him something to read. Mr. Barr 
lent the boy a magazine from which he had torn out one of 
his own stories. The lift-boy brought it back in about 
five minutes. "It ain't no good, sir," he said, sorrowfully; 
"I can't read this muck. Your story ain't in it." He 
had seen Mr. Barr's name in the list of contents. Then be 
sought to borrow a shilling — and got it. 

An Enormous Industry. 
Oar enormous facilities, tremendous output, rapid movement of 
goods always fresh in the hands of consumers, insures the Gail Bor- 
den Eagle Brand Condensed Milk the first place in American homes. 

A haw, coarse whiskey that burns and bites is the kind that kills. 
Whiskey should be soft and mellow with a bouquet like good wine. 
Such a whiskey is a legitimate tonic, nature's antidote for the wear 
and tear of life. The Argonaut brand is of that kind. Not drunkards 
but drinkers drink it. The sole agents for the United States are 
E. Martin & Co., H First street. 



Ir you have suits, gowns, gloves, laces, tapestries, ribbons, or any- 
thing else that requires renovation, send them to the Spaulding 
Cleaning and Dyeing establishment, 127 Stockton street. Here things 
are cleaned in the most approved fashion. The best of workmen and 
apparatus are employed, and the prices are reasonable. Spaulding 
will make yonr husband's old suit of clothes look like new. 



"During a recent sharp skirmish," says The Sphere, 

"an English officer in South Africa noticed that one of 
his guns was in danger. Calling an officer to his side he 
requested him to go and help the captain to try and bring 
it in. 'Pardon,' he added, as the officer turned to obey, 
'perhaps you do not know the captain.' The officer had 
not the pleasure. ' I'll introduce you, then — charming 
fellow,' said his lordship, and regardless of bursting shells 
and puffs of dirt which marked the pitch of bullets all 
around them, he cantered along the hillside with him. 
'Captain,' he shouted, 'let me introduce my friend, Mr. 
B. — Captain A. He will lend you a hand to bring in that 
gun; hope neither of you will be knocked over doing it ! " 

~TRY ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE, 

A powder to be shaken into the shoes. Your feet feel swollen, nervous 
and hot, and (ret tired easily. If you have smarting feet or light shoes, try 
Allen's Foot-Ease. It oools the feet and makes walking easy. Cures swol- 
len, sweating feet, ingrowing nails, blisters, and callous spots. Relieves 
corns and bunions of all pain, and gives rest and comfort. Try it to-day. 
Sold by all druggists and shoe stores for 25c. Trial package FREE. Address, 

Allen S. Olmsted. Le Roy, N. Y. 

The San Francisco 

%^/\ | y | ^ Daily of the Coast. 

The latest and most-ieliable news. ^^j5k 

The best and most complete reports on all /^/ 

current events. W 

The SUNDAY CALL (32 pages) replete J] 

with literary and art features in addi- 
tion to the regular news departments 

The WEEKLY CALL (16 pages) the largest and best 
$1 00 weekly in America. 

Subscription Rates : 

Dailv and Sunday, bv mail, 1 year $6.00 

Sunday Call 1.50 

Weekly Call 1.00 

Adlress all communications to 
W. S. LEAKE, Manager - - - - San Francisco. Cat. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Yellow Jacket Gold and Silver Mining Company 

Location of works. Gold Hill, Slorey county, Nevada. Principal place of 
business. Gold Hill. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Trustees, 
held on the 20th day of June. 1000. an assessment, vNo. 4) of ten (10) 
cents per share was levied on the capital stock of the corporation, payable 
immediately to the secretary, at the office of the company, or to .Tames 
Newlands, Transfer Secretary, room 35, third floor Mills building, N. E. 
corner Kush and Montgomery streets, San Francisco, California 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THURSDAY. THE 26th DAY OF JULY. 1900. 
will be deemed delinquent, and will be duly advertised for sale at public 
auction, and unless payment shall be made before will be sold on Fri- 
day, the 31st day of August, 1900, at 4 o'clock p. in., in front of the office *f 
the company, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of 
advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Trustees. 
W. H. BLAUVELT, Secretary, 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Best & Belcher Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Best & Belcher Min- 
ing Company will be held at the ofllce of the company, room No. 33. Nevada 
Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY. THE 9th DAY OF JULY. 1900. 
at the hour of I o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Diiect- 
ors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, 
June 30th, at 12 o'clock m. M. JAFFE, Secretary. 

Office — Room 33, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief 
of suffering, humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest 
Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Parapic Electrical apparatus, A 
CoBPSof well trained nurses of both sexes, skilled in all forms of 
treatments and manipulations, Rest Core scientifically carried out. 
The Purest and best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * A 
quiet, borne-like place, beautiful scenery. Mount Hamilton and the 
famous Lick Observatory in plain view; one block from electric 
cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the citv. Terms $10 to 
$20 per week, including medical attention and regular treatment. 
Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



July 7 1900 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS LKTTKK. 



- 




nER Resorts 









_" 1 * * 



The Niw» I.kttier ha* established at lm offloe, No. Kearny Mrccl. a 
tellable Bureau <»! Information where anyone seeking Information 
ol travel, attraction*, prices ol entertainment, and all other facts that are 
nee cry to a choice of a Hummer Resort may h« obtained FRRR. 



LAKE TAHOE 

RTJBK-oN SPRINGS HI 

On the Rubicon River, ten mtlca w ■ »i 
of lj\kc Tahoe. The water* of these 
spring* possess marvelous otirttlva 
properties, especially for the cure of 
Stomach. Liver, and Kidney Ail- 
ments, and is an absolute spectlU- for 
Rheuuintic Gout, Nervous Dyspep- 
sia, and Catarrh. 

Rates: $2 per day: t!2 per week. 

Stage connects with steamer daily at 
McKinney's. 

D. ABBOTT, Proprietor. 




The Discoverer of Rubicon Springs. 



THE TALLAC 



Lake Tahoe, Cal. 



Open for tbe season from May 15th. Give 
your family an entire change of climate. Ho 
more staging; railroad from Truckee to 
Tahoe. Dr. Pottenger, resident physician. 
For information, inquire of Traveler Bureau, 
20 Montgomery street, or address 

M. LAWRENCE & GO. - - - - 



Tallac. 



Lake county 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural Mineral 
Steam Baths in . . 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. Ahdebsoh. Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return 
reduced to $8. Send for circular. 

O^-Full particulars at S. F. News Lettek, h\i Kearny St., 8. F. 

HOTEL BENVENUE and COTTAGES 

Lakeport, Gal. 

Lakeport's Summer Resort. Situated overlooking the shore on 
Clear Lake. New Pavilion, boathouse, and bowling alley. Open all 
the year. Special facilities for accommodating families with child- 
ren; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing. 
Lovely drives and walks. Kates, $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 



SKACCS' HOT SPRINGS, 

SONOMA COUNTY, only 4% hours from San Fran- 
cisco and but 9 miles' staging; waters noted for medicinal virtues; best 
natural bath in the State; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at 
door; photographers' room, telephone, telegraph, daily mail: first-class 
hotel and stage service ; morning and afternoon stages. Round trip from 
San Francisco only $5.50. Take Tiburon ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3:30 p. in. 
Terms, 82 per day or $12 per week. References: Any guest of the past five 
years. Patronage constantly increasing. 

J. F. MTJLGREW, Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS VILLA 

Kent Station, Ross Walley, Marin Go. 

A popular summer resort, 45 minutes from the city; salt water 
bathing, boating, fishing, etc. Terms reasonable; reduction to fam- 
ilies. For particulars, address 

Mbs. E. Patterson, Proprietress. 
Take Sausalito Ferry. 



LAUREL DELL LAKE 



Lake County 



The most attractive place in Lake County 
to spend your vacation. Boating, bathing, 
bowling, tennis, livery, new walks, etc. 
Write for circular. 



H. WAMBOLD, 



Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



HOBERC'S RESORT 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand Hve 
hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, lowest |>rir,e. 
First-class family table and pleasant rooms, seven to 
eight dollars per week ; surrounding scenery unsurpassed 
by any springs in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. 
Buy ticket direct for Hoberg's, Lake county, Cal. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 



It is just lovely now at 



No fogs; warm and bright 
Soda water baths. 



NAPA SODA SPRINGS 

Swimming pool. 



HOTEL VENDOME, San Jose. 

One of California's most attractive resorts. The 
starting point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, fur cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly- 
kept and up-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal , or address 



GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



HOTEL del CORONADO 

Motto: "Best of everything:." Costs no more then plainer resorts. 

BEST: Beach, Table, Water, Climate. 
Boating, Bathing, Fishing. 

GOLF, TENNIS, and all games. Most delightful summer 
climate. Best Mineral Water on the Coast. Address 

B. S. BABCOCK, M'G'R,. Coronado, Cat. 

THE CELEBRATED SISSON TAVERN 

Now open. Situated at the foot of Mt. Sbasta, half a mile from 
the station. Free buss meets trains. Altitude 3500 feet. Fresh 
cream and d liry produce. Climate unsurpassed ; average beat, 80 
degrees. Any one wishing to spend an outing in the mountains 
will find this a most desirable place. No poison oak. For further 
information, address Mas. L. M. Sisson. 

THE THOUSAND ISLAND HOUSE 

Thousand Islands, Alexan- 
dria Bay, NEW YORK 

The Thousand Island 
House is without doubt the 
most desirable and delight- 
f ul sumuir r lesort in the 
country. A thoroughly 
modern and up - to - date 
house equipped with a 
large number of public and 
private baths, and lighted 
throughout with electric- 
ity. The region in which 
this hotel stands is one of 
those places nature seems 
to have created for the sole 
pleasure of man. The 
beautiful St. Ijiwreuee River, with its current ever flowing to the sea, its 
more than "1000 islands," some large, some small. Nowhere in the country 
can fishing and boating be so thoroughly en j on ed. For fuller information 
send two 2-cent stamps for illustrated booklet and rates, to O. G. Staples, 
Riggs House, Washington, D. C, or Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 




18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 




FOURTH of July week is always an off one in San 
Francisco socially, and particularly has it been the 
case this year, nearly all the items regarding the beau 
monde coming from outside the city limits; for though it 
is a question as to the enjoyability of many of the resorts 
during the national holiday period, there are few who will 
own up to being in town on the "glorious Fourth" itself. 
The different resorts were full to overflowing, and people 
who have country homes of their own had crowds of guests 
all of whom were delightfully entertained at the numer- 
ous house parties which are becoming quite a fad with our 
people. In the way of amusement it has been golf and 
tennis at San Rafael, golf and tennis at Del Monte, golf 
and tennis at B'lingum, with a variety of other things 
sandwiched in between. The tennis tournament com- 
menced at San Rafael last Saturday and was continued 
during the earlier half of the week, Bishop Moreland cut- 
ting quite a figure on Tuesday last among the players, 
and though on the losing side he bore his defeat bravely. 

Sausalito has claimed the most important wedding of 
the present week in the ceremony which united Miss 
Louise Campbell and Dr. Emmet Rixford. There have 
been pink weddings, blue weddings, green and white, pink 
and white, and purely white weddings in our Swim, but it 
has remained for little Sausalito to give us a rainbow 
wedding, for surely so may be termed the pretty cere- 
mony which was performed there at Christ Church last 
Tuesday. The little edifice itself looked charmingly cool 
and attractive in its garniture of green, ferns and vines 
artistically arranged, meeting the eye at every turn, 
roses in the chancel giving the interior its sole touch of 
color. During the seating of the guests, who quite filled 
every pew, musical selections were given by Professor 
Henry Holmes on the violin and Miss de Fremery on the 
organ, and at noon the Mendelssohn wedding march from 
her fair fingers gave notice of the arrival of the bridal 
party. First to enter were the Misses Pringle, de Frem- 
ery, Alice Findley, Mabel Mason, Katherine Rixford, Con- 
stance Borrowe and Grace Martin, who wore pretty 
gowns of organdie over white, pink, purple and green 
silk, hats to correspond, and carrying clusters of sweet 
peas and poppies. After them came the four ushers, 
Allyn Rixford, Hans Barkan, Louis Bartlett and H. A. 
Yeasell; the pretty little flower girl, Edith Lowe, and 
Sydney Wynn, the page, were next in line, followed by 
the Misses Caroline Rixford and Frances Reed in white 
mull gowns and Gainsborough hats, who officiated as 
bridesmaids; then Miss Cornelia Campbell, the maid-of- 
honor, also in white, and finally the bride, escorted by her 
father. She was robed in white satin trimmed with 
duchesse lace, orange blossoms confined her tulle veil to 
her coiffure, and her sole ornament was a diamond cres- 
cent, one of her bridal gifts. At the chancel awaited them 
the groom, his best man, W. W. Sanderson, and the Rev. 
Henry Hewett, who performed the ceremony to the soft, 
low strains of music from the organ. A wedding dejeuner 
followed the church service at the Campbell residence on 
the hill, which was beautifully adorned, with ferns and 
roses, and late in the afternoon the young couple departed 
for a honeymoon trip South. 

The medicos have had an inning this week as bride- 
grooms, two members of that profession filling the role, 
for to-day at noon the Kittle villa in Ross Valley will be 
the scene of the marriage of Miss Lucia Kittle and Dr. H. 
N. Sherman, to which a large number of their friends have 
been bidden. 

The daintiest of the pink and white summer weddings 
took place last Saturday at noon, when Miss Flora Dean 
and Walter Magee Jr. were joined in marriage by Bishop 
Nicholls, who had the assistance of the Rev. Mr. Foute in 
tying the nuptial knot. The ceremony was performed at 
the home of the bride's mother, Mrs. W. P. Shaw, on Van 



Ness avenue amid the loveliest floral surroundings, Ameri- 
can beauty roses holding leading place, and of which the 
bridal bower was composed. The bride, who was given 
away by her grandfather, Simeon Wenban, wore an ex- 
quisite costume of white embroidered mulle trimmed with 
rich lace and carried a bouquet of lilies of the valley. Her 
sister, Miss Ethel Dean, who appeared as maid of honor, 
was gowned in pink crepe over pink silk and her bouquet 
was pink roses. Clarence Follis officiated as best man. 
The bridal dejeuner which followed the ceremony was a 
very pleasant one, and the same afternoon the happy pair 
sailed by the steamer Doric for Japan, where they will 
spend their honeymoon. 

There was another pink and white wedding on Satur- 
day, which was also a home ceremonial, taking place at 
the residence of William Sexton, on Washington street, 
at half-past nine in the evening. The bride was Miss 
Emma Sexton, the groom Percy V. Long, and the cere- 
mony which united them was performed by the Reverend 
Father Clancey in the beautiful floral bower placed in the 
largest of the three parlors. The bridal robe was of white 
mousseline de soie, and the bouquet was lilies of the val- 
ley; Miss Nettie Sexton, who was her sister's sole atten- 
dant, wore a pretty gown of pink mousseline de soie, 
trimmed with tulle, and carried a cluster of pink roses. 
The groom was supported by Judge F. H. Dunne as best 
man. After congratulations were offered and received, a 
handsome supper was served in the pink-trimmed dining 
room. Mr. and Mrs. Long are spending their honeymoon 
in Southern California. 

The engagement is announced of Colonel J. E. Slinkey, 
late proprietor of the El Monte Hotel, Sausalito, and Mrs. 
J. C. Heitbahn of Chicago, 111., who is at present on a 
visit to this coast. 

The friends of Mrs. Edie (Clemmie Kip) will be glad to 
hear that she is en route home from Manila, and wili spend 
the rest of the summer and autumn in California. Dr. 
Edie remains in the Philippines. Mrs. Polhemus and Miss 
Maie make welcome additions to the ranks of summer cot- 
tagers at Sausalito. The Monteagles are, as usual, spend- 
ing the summer at Blithedale, and so are the Duke Bax- 
ters. Consul and Mrs. John Simpson and their daugh- 
ters, the Misses Agnes, Maud and Amalie, have gone to 
Highland Springs for a stay of several weeks; Miss Jennie 
Dunphy and her niece, Miss Viola Piercey, have been do- 
ing the Yosemite; Colonel and Mrs. M. P. Maus have 
been enjoying a visit to Castle Crag. Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Keeney left last week for a visit to Gotham, Miss 
Ethel, who accompanied them, will remain East all sum- 
mer. 

Following is a list of San Francisco people now at Hotel 
del Monte: Mrs. Mary McKinney, Miss Jessie Smith, A. 
E. Rouse, I. Cutte, Mr. and Mrs. A. Levy, Mrs. H. C. 
Benson, Mrs. T. H. Breeze, Miss Louisa Breeze, Mrs. A. 
H. Hill, Miss Marion Earle, Mrs. J. S. Jerome, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Wilhoit, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Mighell and family, 
Mrs. Jas. Jerome, Miss S. Jerome, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. 
McAllister, Mrs. S. W. Pease, Mrs. D. R. Pease, Mrs. D. 
R. Collins, Mr. and Mrs. Clayburgh and family, Mr. and 
Mrs. S. J. Johnson and family, Mrs. Henry Schmieden, 
Mrs. C. E. Green and family, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Worden, 
Mrs. A. N. Towne, Mrs. J. N. Knowles, Misses Knowles, 

A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX QOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM. OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them, I recommend *Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all drucgrists and Fancy-roods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
ji i>d Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street, N. Y, 




July 7, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



»9 



Mr and Mrs. II K Ball, Mr aud Mrs W J Nca.i 
Alice Hajter, Miss Kthel Hjjfer, Mr. and Mrs 1* \V 
Selby and family. Mr and Mrs. \V M. Smith, Kmele 
Bruyuicrc, M' and Mrs. A. L. <: lover, Mr ami M 
K. Campbell, Mr. and Mrs Cbas. Hirsch and family. Mw 
Rothschild, L. O. Kellogg, Mr. and Mrs. 'M \V. 
'.ruham, Mr and Mrs. C. S. Latmeister. Mrs. Taylor, C 
S. Laumeister Jr., Mr and.Mrs. Brace Hayden ardfamilv, 
Mr. and Mr? S. Sachs and family, Mr." and Mr- 
Lewis, Miss Edna Lewis, Mr and Mrs. A. Schilling and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Leon Sloss and family, Mr. and .Mrs. 
A M Rosen baum. 

Mrs. John Malmesbury Wright is spending the summer 
at Ross Valley. 

Mrs. D. E. Miles and daughter, Miss Ethel Miles, are 
taking their summer vacation at Black rock Range, where 
Colonel Miles has built a cottage for bis outings. 

Among the arrivals from San Francisco during the past 
week at the Hotel Rafael were: E. Averv McCarthy, Mr. 
and Mrs. Chas. Newman, P. A. Greenwood, H. M. Hol- 
brooke, A. Goodman, Mr. and Mrs. J. Heyman. Miss 
Eleanor Wood, Miss E. A. Rickard, Wm. B. Collier, Jr.,- 
Percy Kahn, J. M. O'Brien, W. L. Honnold, L. M. Starr, 
Mrs. L. Dreyfus, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvian Weill, C. Harden, 
P. A. Coakley, Christian Proelich, C. T. Scott, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. E. Page, Chas. Sonntag. E. R. Field, M.D., A. L. 
Field, C. L. Field, Miss S. R. Nathan, Miss P. Nathan, 
Mrs. I. Glass and son, Mr. and Mrs. B. Triest and family, 
Mr. W. P. Morgan, Miss Hawkins, Miss McNally, Bishop 
Moreland and wife, Grant M. Smith, Arthur B. Watson, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Elston, Miss Morgan, B. Hecht, Mr. 
and Mrs. L. P. Weil, H. I. Weil. 



15/>e Chinese Household, 



S CHINESE household is a community of which the 
parents are the head, over which the mother rules 
with a rod of iron. Each son must bring his wife to his 
mother's house upon his marriage, and he must remain 
there with his growing family. Until she is fortunate 
enough to become the mother of a son the position of the 
daughter-in-law is that of a menial and under-servant. 
When guests are received she must allow her mother-in- 
law to take precedence in all things. She will not seat 
herself until her elder relative is comfortable and she 
never speaks until the mother-in-law has had the first 
word. I think it must have been in China that the time- 
honored joke on the esteemed lady was first thought of. 
Here she is evidently supreme. 

The great majority of Chinese women can neither read 
nor write. They are hemmed in by walls of the court 
which they seldom leave and the range of ideas is conse- 
quently narrow. It is difficult for a stranger who under- 
stands the language to converse with them. Even the 
servant girl question is not debatable among them. 

The guest will be asked her age and the older she is the 
more admirable will she appear in the eyes of her enter- 
tainers, for youth in China is not entitled to much respect. 
Any peculiarities in the guest's attire will be carefully 
toted and all that she possesses will be extravagantly 
praised. 

The Chinese lady of good birth is never seen outside the 
house without a chaperon as it is considered a, breach of 
propriety. One of the stigmas attached to the name of ' 
the present dowager empress is a tradition that she once 
went out on the street alone to purchase some cake of 
which she was very fond. 

— "I suppose she entertained brilliantly at her opera 
party?" "Far from itl She let the conversation lag 
dreadfully! Do you know, there were times when we 
could almost hear the music?" 



Ahove all things don't become a drunkard; use whiskey moder- 
ately and use the best. Jesse Moore "AA" is the purest and best. 

Allen's Press Clipping Boreau, 510 Montgomery street, San Francisoo. 
deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political, 
from press of State, coast and countryTel. Main 1042. 

Oh all the Pullman cars Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey is to be had. 




Gducationai. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Term begins August 6th. 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic, 
Full collegia course of studies. A hoarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael. Cal. 



Irving Institute. 

Boarding and day school tor young ladies, 
2126 California street, will reopen AUGUST 
6, 1900. Accredited to the Universities ; pri- 
mary department for children ; carriage will 

call. 

Rev. Edward B. Church, A. M., Principal 

Mills College and Seminary. 

Grants diplomas and Confers degrees; seminary course ac- 
credited to the "Universities; rare opportunities offered in 
music, art and elocution. . Thirty - fifth year ; fall term 
opens AUGUST 8, 1900. Write for catalogue to 
Mrs. C. T. Mills, President, Mills College P. O., Cal. 



nun 



Business College 

24 Post street, San Francisco. 



Bookkeeping, business practice, 
shorthand, typing, languages, telegraphy, English 
branches, electrical, civil and mining engineering, assaying, blow pipe, geol- 
ogy, mineralogy, surveying, mechanical drawing, etc.; 25 teachers; individ- 
ual instruction; 200 graduates annually in positions; students can enter any 
time. New eighty-page catalogue free. 



20 



SAN FBANOISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 




SONG OF THE MY ST \C -father abram j. ryan- 

I walk down the Valley of Silence- 
Down the dim, voiceless valley alone! 

And I hear not the fall of a footstep 
Around me save God's and my own; 

And ihe hush of my heart is as holy 
As houses where angels have flown ! 

Long ago was I weary of voices 

Whose music my heart could not win ; 

Long ago I was weary of noises 

That fretted my soul with their din ; 

Long ago I was weary of places 

Where I met but the human and sin. 

I walked in the world with the worldly ; 

I craved what the world never gave, 
And 1 said, "In the world each Ideal, 

That shines like a star on life's wave, 
Is wrecked on the shores of the Heal, 

And sleeps like a dream in the grave." 

And still did 1 pine for the Perfect, 

And still found the False with the True; 

I sought 'mid the liuiuac for heaven, 

But caught a mere glimpse of its blue; 

And I wept when the clouds of the mortal 
Veiled even that glimpse from my view. 

And I toiled heart-tired of the human, 
And I moaned 'mid the mazes of men. 

Till I knelt long ago at an altar 

And beard a voice call me. Since then 

I walk down the Valley of Silence 
That lies far beyond mortal ken. 

Do you ask what I found in the valley? 

'Tis my trysting-place with the Divine, 
And I fell at the feet of the Holy, 

And above me a voice said: "Be mine," 
And there arose from the depths of my spirit 

An echo— "My heart shall be thine." 
Do you ask how I live in the valley? 

I weep, and I dream, and I pray, 
But my tears are as sweet as the dew-drops 

That fall on the roses in May ; 
And my prayers like a perfume from censers 

Ascendeth to God night and day. 

In the hush of the Valley of Silence 

I dream all the songs that I sing; 
And the music floats down the dim valley, 

Till each finds a word for a wing 
That to hearts, like the Dove of the Deluge, 

A message of peace they may bring. 
But far on the deep there are billows 

That never shall break on the beach ; 
And I have heard songs in the silence 

That never shall float into speech ; 
And I have had dreams in the valley 

Too lofty for language to reach. 

And I have seen thoughts in the valley— 
Ah me I how my spirit was stirred 1 

And they wear holy veils on their faces- 
There footsteps can scarcely be heard; 

They pass through the valley like virgins 
Too pure for the touch of a word 1 

Do you ask me the place of that valley? 
Ye hearts that are harrowed by care! 

It lieth afar between mountains, 

And God and His angels are there; 

And one's the dark mount of sorrow, 

And one— the bright mountain of prayer! 



' He is dead whose band is not open wide 
To help the need of a human brother; 
He doubles the length of his lifelong ride 

Who gives his fortunate place to another; 
And a thousand million lives are his 
Who carries the world in his sympathies— 
To give is to live!" 



BANKING 



- Success. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, 92,000,000 Surplus, 81,000,000 

Profit and Loss Account, January 1. 1900, $2,321,212 

WILLIAM ALVORD President! CHARLES R. BISHOP, Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I I. F. MOTJLTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank: Union National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs. 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto Qesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits July 1, 1899, $24,920,395 Reserve Fund $205215 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 442,763 

E. B. PO ND, P resident W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— George W. Beaver, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, Georee C. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin, George 
Tashelra, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands i n the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San FranciBCo, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. in., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Co. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager P. L. LIPMAN, Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons, Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland. Or., R. M. Dooly. Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine, Andrew Chrlsteson, Oliver Eldridge. 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook. 

John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 91,000,000. Paid Up Capital 9300,000 

James D. Phelan. President 8. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Stoby. Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Nea), James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,238,372.45 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,00C 000 00 

Deposits June 30. 1900 ,28,93-S,395.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier. A. H. K. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary. A. H. Muller: General Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Russ. N, Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and 1. N. 
Walter. 

Continental Building Xt Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital. .8 1 0,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... $210,000 
Paid-in-Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent, interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker- Wool worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Pald-up-Capltal $1,000,000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W. E. BROWN, Vice-President W. Gregg. Jr., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E. B. Pond, W. E Brown, O. E. Green, G. W, 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G- W. Scott. 



July 7, 1900 



\VS LETTER. 



II 




BANKING 



STOLE* THOU THUEVKS. 



41 I BEG your pardon, sir," said an elderly Scotch gen- 
1 tleman to the passenger opposite him in a Brighton 
train, "but cin you kindly oblige me with a match?" The 
Scotch gentleman had in bis band a pipe, charged with 
tobacco. The gentleman addressed made a careful search, 
and intimated with regret that he had no match. The 
Scot repeated his inquiry to another occupant of the com- 
partment; and he also was sorry he could not oblige. 
There were seven passengers in addition to the Scot. He 
asked the lot, but not one of them could give him a match. 
"Good gracious," he remarked, "this is terrible; not one 
of you has a match. I'll have to use one of my own 1" He 
produced an enormous box, and lit up. 

— "Of course, I'm in favor of suffrage for women, 
Henrietta," said Mr. Meekton. "But I don't think they 
ought to go to the polls themselves." "What do you 
mean?" "They ought to be able to send their husbands 
to vote for both. If they go to the polls themselves, it 
will confuse matters. A perfect gentleman who saw a 
lady at the polls looking a little worried would feel com- 
pelled to lift his hat politely and say, 'Madam, take my 
vote.'" 

— Gbowells — I wonder what makes that boy cry so 
when the nurse is trying to wash the dirt from his face? 
Mrs. Gbowells— O, I suppose he takes after you. 
Gbowells — Now, what do you mean by that? Mrs. 
Gbowells— He wants the earth. 

— "Misteb," called the victim from beneath the bed 
coverings. "Well?" asked one of the burglars gruffly. 
"Would you fellows mind carrying off that ornamental 
watchdog of mine in the front yard with the rest of your 



— "Mrs. Yottngly is going to sue for a divorce." "On 
what ground? " "Intolerable cruelty. Last week her 
husband locked her for two hours in the same room with 
five new frocks and two new hats — and no mirror." 

— "I am an anti," declared Sammy Snaggs, whose father 
is an ardent expansionist. "You are what?" demanded 
the elder Snaggs, with great surprise. "I am an anti," 
repeated Sammy, "an anti-spankationist." 

— "Do you believe in teaching the languages in the 
schools?" asked Mr. Clingstone of Miss Gildersleeve. 
"Yes, indeed," replied the young lady. "Everyone should 
be able to speak English and golf." 

— "See here, landlord, I've lost all my money and a 
handful of matches besides — can't you help me out of my 
difficulty for a day or two?" "Certainly— here's another 
box of matches!" 

— Customer— Give me ten cents worth of paregoric, 
please. Druggist — Yes, sir. Customer (absent-mindedly) 
—How much is it? Druggist — A quarter. 

—Lady (engaging servant)— You seem to possess every 
necessary qualification. Have you a sweetheart? Pretty 
Servant— No, mum. but I can soon get one. 

— Mrs. Peok — You know very well, Henry, that I'm a 
• woman of few words. Henry — True; my dear, but the 
few are shamefully overworked. 

— Titewadd — My wife never spends a cent unnecessarily. 
Wunder— How do you manage it? Titewadd— Never 
give her a cent unnecessarily. 

Artistic Hardwood Grilles 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams Build- 
ing, N .E. corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 

THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) offers 
Eastern passengers three elegantly appointed vestibuled express 
trains daily between Chicago and New York and Chicago and Boston. 
For sleeping car reservations and fall information address Jay W. 
Adams, Pac. Coast Pass. Agt., 37 Crocker Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorised Capital. to.D0O.O0O, Capital fluhacrihed «ml Pnllr P.I.I. tJ.4W.ono 

IIKAD OPPICB— 71 Lombard .Ircct. London. 

PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber ol Commerce Building. 

TACOMA BRANCH-lSOIPaeWo Avenue. 

Bankers-- Bank ol England, lymdon Joint Stock Bank, I linlted. 

Agents and Correspondent: New York— J. l'.Morgan A Co.: Oiii' 
Union National Bank. 

This bank Is prepared to trrant letters ol credit available In any part ol the 
world and to transact every description ol hanking and exchange business 

William Mackintosh. Manager. 



Bank of British Columbia 

8. E. cor. Buah and Sansome Sta. Incorporated by Royal Charter, lWiU. 

HEAD OFFICE: 00 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up. t3.000.000. Reserve Fund, 1600.000 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kaniloops, Ni.nl- 
amo. Nelson Rossland. Sandon. British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general bunking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon Its 
head office and branches, and upon its (.gents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada: Chicago— First National Bank: 
Li vkbpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico; South 
America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Bunking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and-TBiNlDAD (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. COR. SANSOME AND SUTTBB ST8. 

Subscribed Capital (2,500,000 Paid-Up Capital, t2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, (925.000 

HEAD OFFICE— to Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency ol the London, Paris and American Bank, 
Limited. No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. : Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

8IG. GREENEBAUM c. ALTSCITDL. Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sis,, San Franoisco 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
\. Pope, H. E. Huntington, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York-Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown, Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 81,000.000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, 8375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal, Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savings. Inviostments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors — Ernst A. Denlcke, F. Kronenbere, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. O. Slebe, Albert O. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denlcke, President; P. Kronenberg, vice-President , H. 
Brunner Cashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Author! zed:..... $6,000,000 Paid TJp 81,500.0m' 

.Subscribed 8,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,00' 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and BellB exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LTUENTHAL, Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building, 



Interest paid on deposits. 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 

DIRECTORS. 

S. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutehen 
R. H. Pease 



22 



TWO 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 

MINIATURES. 



ft MAVIS hung in a small cage just 
above the people's heads in Fleet 
street. It had hung there for three 
years, and had ceased to sing. Miny 
people noticed the bird, but mostly 
the bird noticed the people. It had 
friends in the throng— some young, 
some old. 

A young woman, with sad eyes and 
a wedding-ring on her finger, stopped 
in passing to push a bit of green be- 
tween the bars of the cage. "Poor 
thing!' 1 she said, slowly; "it is so sad, 
so worthless I If I dared I would open 
your prison door and let you fly away 

to life and love and liberty; but " 

Here she jerked her thumb back- 
wards over her shoulder in the direc- 
tion of a tall figure in blue, standing 
like a monument at the street corner, 
and said something which was either 
"Bobby" or "Grundy" — perhaps 
both. 

"Ob, damn Grundy I" said a hurry- 
ing man, as he placed his hat more 
jauntily over his left ear and stepped 
lightly along. The young woman dis- 
appeared suddenly. 

"That's a h'M.P. I" remarked the 
crossing-sweeper. 

"But I thought he made your 
laws?" exclaimed the bird. 

"So he do— that ain't difficult. It's 
the keeping on 'em that bothers 'im," 
replied the man, and went on sweep- 
ing. 

"Wish to goodness I'd put on a 
blue tie instead of this!" said a man, 
gazing at himself in the shop-window. 
This man was not interested in birds, 
and the bird made no remark, but he 
turned his head a little wearily from 
side to side as if in pain. 

A youth squared himself before the 
cage; he was in evening clothes, 
covered by a shabby overcoat. The 
time was nine a. m., and he was going 
home. 

" I used to wake in themornin' wi' the loud 
sango' the lark, 
And the whistling o' the ploughboys as 
the' gaed to their wark. 

Only you are not a lark, and — I am 
not what I was." He hiccoughed, 
and passed into the crowd. 

"That's a pity," thought the bird; 
"but you ate bad from inclination. 
A bird's song would not influence you 
much then, or now — unless you were 
half drunk." 

"Well to be you, Guv'nor," said a 
small boy with the face of an old man. 
"You 'ave wituals and lodgin' pro- 
vided." The voice was wistful. He 
had eaten nothing for twenty-four 
hours. 

"You have liberty," replied the 
bird. 

"Not much!" grinned the boy; and 
his face grew years younger as he 
nodded his head in the direction of 
the figure in blue. "But lor', livin' 
is bloomin' 'ard." 

" Bloomin' 'ard," echoed the bird, 
mechanically: it was so long since he 
had thought about it. The boy dived 
under a horse's head, and was gone. 
"He looked almost young," said the 
L bird, sadly, and suddenly found a wo- 



man was staring at him through the 
bars. 

" But it doesn't matter much once 
the mainspring is broken," she was 
saying. "Things go smoother then. 
You ought to know that!" 

"What broke your mainspring?" 
asked the bird. 

" Life!" said the woman, and her 
mouth shut with a snap. She was a 
sempstress. 

The next who stopped was an old 
man with dim eyes and dissipated 
face. "Every bird sang o' his mate, 
and fondly so did I o' mine," he said, 
softly. 

" Where is she?" asked the bird. 
"Dead," replied the man; "and I 
am to the Devil long ago. Bjt it 
might have been different." 

"What will you say when you meet 
her again?'' said the bird. 

"Oh, you are from the country!" 
jeered the man, and turned into the 
next public-house. 

"My missis 'ad a little this morn- 
ing!" exclaimed a big, burly navvy, 
cheerily, in passing. There was love 
and joy and hope in his face. 

"I hope he will live," replied the 
bird; and his mind wandered off to a 
grave — over which he had sung many 
a time — of a small boy, loved of his 
father, who had died in the spring- 
time. Unconsciously he began to 
sing again. 

"Quit that!" said a hard voice; 
"Fleet street isn't the place for a 
lament — we haven't the time." He 
was an overworked business man, 
who had cast aside for gold the only 
pure affection ever offered him. And 
he knew it. 

But the bird did not hear. He was 
intently watching a tall figure in 
yachting clothes coming down the 
street, a man who appeared quite 
unconscious of his surroundings. The 
bird's song grew louder and louder — 
always the same sad note. 

The man stopped suddenly and 
looked like a trapped animal. "It 
was a mavis sang beside his open 
grave, I remember," he said, slowly. 
"He would not have this so — a bird — 
one of his friends — shut up in a cage 
in London." He hesitated a moment, 
and then deliberately put up his hand 
and opened the door. "For his sake!" 
he murmured under his breath. The 
bird came out and lit on his hand. 



July 7, 1900. 



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1 ] I for Automobiles 



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"Go and find a grave— a wee lad's 
grave in an old churchyard in the 
North — and tell him from me, it was 
for his sake!" 

The bird flew up and up, singing as 
if his heart would bjrst, and disap- 
peared over the chimney-pots. 

By the evening the wee laddie re- 
ceived the message. 

The tall man went into the shop and 
told simply what he had done. 

"You 'ave a cheek!" exclaimed the 
shopman, indignantly. "You'll pay 
me a fiver for your interference." 

" What a bargain!" said the man as 
he walked out at the door and went 
down the street. — C. L. S., in Vanity 
Fair. 



ft BRILLIANTLY warm spring 
morning. Birds bursting their 
hearts with volumes of song. Daffo- 
dils and wall-flowers blazing under the 
red lichen-covered wall in the kitchen 
garden ; and two walked down the 
broad box-edged path to see if the 
robins had built their nests in the old 
place again. A tall, well-built man, 
a wee lad. "Daddy," said the boy, 
"next year we will have a bed of vio- 
lets here, don't you think?" "Yes; 
next year," answered the man, ab- 
sently. He was hardly listening; af- 
terwards he remembered. 

The summer passed, aud autumn 
came, bringing soft, balmy days — 
real hunting weather. The love be- 
tween these two had deepened and 
grown into something rare and beau- 
tiful: hero worship on the part of the 
child, and deep, tender devotion on 
that of the man. Every day the lit- 
tle figure wandered off in the twilight 
to wait at the large gates for the 
man's return from hunting; chuckling 
with glee in relating how he had es- 
caped from the nursery, and then, af- 
ter be had been swung up on the 
hunter's back, while his father walked 
beside him listening with eager inter- 
est to a tale of the day's sport. Beau- 
tiful days in which chains of sympathy 
and love were forged round two hearts 
stronger than death ; betrayed at 



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Box 241, Shirley, Haas. 




July 7, igoo. 

time* by the man's gray eyes deepen- 
ing into blackness when thev rested 
on the pure and loving confidence ex- 
pressed on the upturned (ace of his 
little son. Once a fine day turned 
suddenly into a blinding wintery even- 
ing. The snow fell thick and fast on 
a small waiting figure. The man — 
little dreaming— tarried by the way. 
returning much later than usual, to 
find a frozen little being, who said, 
simply: "1 knew you would come, 
daddie." The child was too cold to 
see the look of pain pass over the 
man's face or to hear the groan that 
was too heart-wrung to be a curse. 

The spring came. The daffodils 
bloomed again, but the boy died. In 
his coffin the man laid a profusion of 
wall-flowers and apple-blossom. The 
boy had wanted to see their fruit 
ripen: it never would. They carried 
the coffin down the steep, rugged 
hillside, across the burn, up again in- 
to the little churchyard, where eight 
tall poDlars kept watch by the dead. 
Peaceful spot I Peaceful enough al- 
most to soothe the bitterness out of 
a broken heart. Here the strong 
man laid his little son to rest. A 
mavis sang a plaintive note as they 
lowered the coffin. And the cup was 
full. 

For many months the man cruised 
round the most dangerous parts of 
the northern coast. All hunting days 
were done. The boy's name he spoke 
not again. Once far out at sea he 
sat alone long into the night, a letter 
on bis knee; it was from the gardener 
and ran: "No, sir, there 13 no violet 
bed beneath the wall, and the robins 
did not build again this year. " ' 'Thank 
God!" groaned the man. — C. L. S., in 
Vanity Pair. 



8AN KRA> \ i:\V9 LETTER. 



»3 



SOME one asked quite seriously, 
writes Miss Gilder, in a current 
Harper's Bazar, if I thought that 
the announced engagement of Mr. 
Paul Leicester Ford would interfere 
with the sale of his novels. I smiled 
the smile of incredulity. 

"You need not smile," said the 
lady. "I know that Richard Harding 
Davis's marriage has greatly inter- 
fered with the sale of his novels. His 
readers, who are largely young girls, 
like to think of him as an unmarried 
man. They find his books more inter- 
esting when they so regard him." 

"What about Kipling?" I gasped. 
"Has his stock depreciated because 
of the wife and babies?" 

"Oh no!" was the reply. "It is 
different with Kipling. He writes 
more for men, and then his stories 
are not love stories." 



— He — What colors would you sug- 
gest as appropriate for our new 
bicycle club. She — O, black and blue, 
by all means! 




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4?/rr -t.+*J A&tNTi NEW YORK 



THE RAGTIME IN PARIS. 



" CODZA, le grand Souzal" Thus 
\J| the newspapers of Paris. And 
upon investigation who does this per- 
sonage turn out to be, but our own 
Mr. John Philip Sousa, apotheosized. 
Paris worships him and his band, — 
1 ' le plus illuitre des /an/ares Ameri- 
caines." Paris is enraptured with the 
leader's "gestes d' automate" and cbest- 
bestarred with medals; delighted with 
"Dixey" and " Marching Through 
Georgia;" above all in a frenzy over 
"those inimitable ragtime upon which 
dance themselves the cake walks, of 
origin negro, which are the rage in 
New York from music halls to draw- 
ing rooms." 

At his opening concert on the 5th 
of May, the American colony (led by 
"Mr. Peck, the very elegant Com- 
missioner - Genera! of the United 
States") gathered to welcome " M. 
Philip Sjusa. " 

The reporter of a Paris paper ob- 
served the colouy with scientific inter- 
est. He observed that when the rag- 
time was heard a significant rustle 
went through the audience, and that 
when the band had finished the "Stars 
and Stripes" the hearers were delir- 
ious. There arose "frenzied applause, 
violent whistles (supreme indication 
of approval.") 

Thus, then, has Paris ascertained 
what American music is, and what 
our composers create. A pleasant 
prospect for the intelligent American, 
the subscriber to seats at the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, or the Philhar- 
monic, or the Thomas concerts, who 
may by chance visit the Exposition. 

"You shall hear some of your own 
music," says the polite Parisian. 
"Oh, we know it well here; it delights 
us, the ragtime. We have learned it 
of your distinguished M. Sousa. He 
composes your national music, is it 
not so?" 

Well, there is no doubt that Mr. 
Sousa does represent, with his music, 
the preference of the majority of 
Americans. It is very likely that 
even in the American colony — made 
up of comparatively intelligent per- 
sons — a "selection" of Mr. MacDow- 
ell's, played by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, would not have caused 
such a tossing up of bats as that 
which followed Mr. Sousa's rendering 
of the "Stars and Stripes." 

It would be pleasant to have the 
United States represented among the 



nations by the best musical organiza- 
tion in the world, since that happens 
to be an American organization. But 
there is some comfort, on the other 
hand, in the reflection that, of their 
kinds, both Mr. Sousa's band and Mr. 
S)usa's music are excellent. — Criter- 
ion. 

LORD Rosslyn, who sent to the 
Daily Mail the good news about 
Pretoria, has in his life played many 
parts. The most diverting to his 
friends, declares "M. A. P.," was 
when he edited "Scotish Life," in 
London. Then he used togi to Hyde 
Park immaculately clad, in the height 
of the season, each day about noon. 
Seated under a tree and smoking a 
succession of cigarettes in an excep- 
tionally long jeweled holder, he would 
ostentatiously correct proofs. Each 
one he accurately laid down in rota- 
tion on the grass beneath four little 
stones, so that after half an hour he 
seemed surrounded by a small ocean 
of white proofs. 



— Mamma— What is Willie crying 
about. Bridget — Shure, ma'am, be 
wanted to go across the street to 
Tommy Green's. Mamma— Well, why 
didn't you let him go? Rimdoet — 
They were having charades, he said, 
ma'am, and I wasn't sure as he'd had 
'em yet. 



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particulars and directions inva' 
able to ladies. 

MARVEL CO. 
Room 21 Times Building, - New York 



Pacific Towel company 

No. 9 Lick Place 

Furnishes 6 hand or roller towels 81 per 
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24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 7, 1900. 



Southern Pacific Co.—Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot o! Market Street] 

leave] Fbom May 13. 1900 [ABBrvE 

•7:00 A Benicia.Suiaun.Elmira.Vacaville.Rumsey. and Sacramento.. *7:45 P 
*7:00 A Shasta Express— Davis, Williams (for Bartlett Springs), Wil- 

lows. Red Bluff, Portland Z?- 45 ** 

*7:30 A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *6:15 p 

*8:00 A Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing, Marysville, Oroville • 1( ," :45 p 

*8:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East "11:45 A 

*8:30a San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placervllle. 

Marysville. Oliico, Red Bluff. *4:15 P 

*8:30a Oakdale, Chinese (for Yosemite). Sonora, Carters #7, P 

*9:00a Haywards, Niles, and way stations 11:45 A 

tf 9:O0A Los Angeles Express— Martinez. Tracy. Lathrop. Stockton. 

Merced and Fresno «'¥* p 

* 9:30a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 6:45 p 

*10:00 A The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago "5:15 P 

*11:O0a Niles, Livermore, Stockton. Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia.Porterville 2[ :15 ' 

*12:00m Haywards, Niles, and way stations "2:45 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers T5:00 A 

*3:00p Hay wards, Niles and way stations I£ :45 p 

*4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa. Calistoga. Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

*4:00p Benicla, Winters. Sacramento. Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysville, Oroville 12 :45 A 

*4:30p Niles, San Jose, and Stockton *7:15 P 

*5:00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles "9:45 A 

*5;00p Fresno Passenger— Martinez, Lathrop, Stockton. Merced, 

Berenda (Raymond for Yosemite). Fresno *12:15 P 

*5:30 p New Orleans Express— Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
geles, Demlne, El Paso. New Orleans, and East "8:45 A 

*5:30p Santa Fe Route— Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East *6:45 p 

*6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose ^ :45 A 

J6KK)P Vallejo .*12:15 P 

*6:00p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne, Omaha. Chicago *ll:45 a 

*6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden. Denver. Omaha, Chicago *4:15 p 

|7:00p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations 19:55 P 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express. Sacramento. Marysville, Red- 
ding. Portland Puget Sound and East "8:15 a 

Coast Division (Narro w Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

J7:45 a Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa Cruz & Principal Way Stations t8:05p 
"8:15 a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruzand waystations *6:20 p 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. New Almaden. Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations tl0:50 A 

*4:15p Newark. San Jose, Los Gatos *8:50 A 

«4:15p Glenwood, Felton, Santa Cruz £8:50 A 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15. 9:00. and 11:00 
a. m., fl:00, *2:00, {3:00, *4:00, |5:00 and*6:00p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00. 10:00 a. m.; 112:00, *1:00 
J2:00. *3:00, J4:00, °5:00 p.m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets ). 

t6:10A Ocean View, South San Francisco . t6:30 P 

T7:00a San Jose and waystations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

J7:30a Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove 

and Principal Way Stations t8:35P 

*9:O0A San Jose. TresPinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, 

San Luis ObiBpo, Surf, Lompoc. and principal waystationB °4:10 P 

•10:40 A San Jose and way stations , *6:35 A 

•11:30 A San Jose, Los Gatos and way stations *5:30 p 

t2:45 P San Mateo. Redwood, Menlo Park. Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 
Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:36 A 

J:30p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 

1:15 f San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:45 A 

>:00p San Jose, Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations +9:00 A 

3:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations +8:35 A 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations +8:00 A 

& U:45P San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. 'Daily. t Sundays excepted. 

t Sundays only. & Saturdays only. 
a Saturday and Sunday. c Sunday and Monday 

The Pacific Tbansfeb Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
infor mation. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hi ogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, July 26, 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, August 21. 1900 

Dobic (via Honolulu) Saturday, September 15, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, October 10, 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Of fice . No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



SS "Moana." Wednesday, July 11. at 8 p. m. 
SS " Australia." Wednesday. July 25, 1900, 2 pm. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Cape town, South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS CO 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office. 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 




City index and Purchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS. 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N. E. corner Eddy and Mason streets. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Bron. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. P. GREANY, 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval ; any 

place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. P. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314-316-318 Main St. 
Iron work of every description designed an d constructed. 

O ~ L. ~~ — For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 

■ jrl JSrir^S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
*-** ***•*'' ivj dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tallers, etc. 

Buchanan Bros., 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco. Tel. 5610 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibdeon Febry— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00. 11:00 A. M; 12:35. 3:30. 5:10, 630 p. M. Thursdays— 
Extra trip al 11 :30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at l:50and 11:30 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00. 9:30, 11:00 A. M.; 1:30. 3:30. 500. 6:20p.m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10. 7 SO, 9:20, 11:10 A. M.: 12:45, 3:40, 5:15 p. M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 p. m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40, 11:10 A.M.; 1:40. 3:40, 5:05, 6:25 P. K. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. * 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect April 15. 1900 
Destinations 


Arrive in San Francisco 


Week days 


Sundays 


Sundays 


Week days 


7:30 ah 
3:30 pm 
5:10 ph 


8:00 AH 
9:30 AH 
5:00 pm 


No^ato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 am 
6;05 ph 
7:35 pm 


8:40 ah 
10:25 am 
6:20 pm 


7:30 AH 
3:30 ph 


8:00 AH 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 
Geyserville, Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


10:25 AH 
6:20 pm 


7:30 ah 
3:30 ph 


8:00 AH 


Hopland, Uklah 


7:35 PH 


10:25 AH 
620 PH 


7:30 ah 
3;30 ph 


8:00 AH 


Ouerneville 


7:35 ph 


10:25 AM 

6:20 ph 


7:30 AH 
5:10 ph 


8:00 ah 
5:00 pm 


\ Sonoma 

1 Glen Ellen 


0:15 am 
6:05 PM 


8:40 ah 
620 ph 


7:30 ah 
3:30 ph 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 


Sebastopol 


10:40 ah 

7:35 pm 


1025 AM 
620 pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs: at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Kelsey ville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Uldah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lierley'a, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville, Booneville. Phllo, Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whites- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, 
Westport, Usal Wlllits, Laytonville, Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Ol- 
een's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf. San Francisco. 

^^^^ For Alaskan ports, 11 a. m.: June 5, 10. 15, 20, 25. 30- 

^■^■^^ July 5, change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

V^^\Vh For B.C. and Puget Sound Ports, 11a. m., June 5. 10, 15, 

AMmi 20. 25, 30. July 5 and every fifth day thereafter. 

fl Sfl|j For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. M.. June 2. 7. 12, 17, 22. 

f^^^M 27, July 2, and every fifth day thereafter. 

^^^^B For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports. 9 a. m.. 
June 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, July 2 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 a. h., June 2, 6, 10, 14, 18. 22. 26. 
30, July 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Mexican ports, 10 A M., 7th of each month. 

For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

G00DALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts.. 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

Only railway owning Its own tracks between San Francisco 
and Chicago, 2550 miles. Personally conducted excur- 
sions in Pullman Tourist Sleeping Cars, three times every 
week to Kansas City, Chicago, and all points East. Get 
handsome folders, ratesand full information at 628 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. 




/ViM ftr oppjr 10 omU. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 30. 185S .annual 9w*«Hp<«m M.On 

NEyIs ilE'TTER 

(Halif jo r n t Ow&toerti sjer. 




Kof. ZJ/ 



Si4ff FRANCISCO, JULY 14, 1900. 



Number 2. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MA RRIOTT 
SH Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
office as Second-class Matter. 

The omce of the S. F. NEWS I ETTER In London. Ene,. Is at 10 Lcadcn- 
hall Bldar. No. 1 l.cadenhalt street. (Fred. A. Marriott. Representative) 
where information may he obtained rctrardinK subscriptions and 
adverliMne rates. Paris. France. Oflicc. 170.87 Avenue dfl I. 'opera. 

All aoclal items, announcements, advertising, or other matter. Intended for 
publication In the current number of tho NEWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

THE time seems opportune for the haDgman to par- 
ticipate in the Colma vendetta. 

THERE is something horrifying in the devastation 
when Croker gets into the presence of a grammar. 

BROTHERLY love as it prevails among the dailies is 
beautiful to see, but the seeing of it requires a micro- 
scopic eye of faith. 

THE wretch who slaughtered Morosco's Belgian hares 
with a club was too hasty. In due time there will be 
a reward for such work. 



_ NCE a number of New York speculators have been 
vJ> sent to jail for efforts to depress stock prices, it is 
obvious that some of the losers bad a pull. 

IT is distressing to Americans that William Waldorf 
Astor should so persistently proclaim himself an as?. 
They cannot forget that he was once one of them. 

RENO marriages, it appears, may be good or they may 
be bad. All depends upon the Judge who may be 
passing upon the matter, and whether his lunch fits him. 

THERE will be little fault found with the circumstance 
that one of the Earps has been shot in Arizona. 
There has seldom been any excuse for not shooting an 
Earp. 

IP the tales of horror sent from China prove to be largely 
baseless, the already unpopular correspondent will be 
so thoroughly despised that he will begin to appreciate it 
himself. 

ENGLISH and German firms that sold arms to the 
Chinese, and foreign officers who taught the use of 
them, may be thrifty, but nobody has accused them of 
patriotism. 

THE gentleman who recently shot his wife is not to be 
prosecuted because the lady is convalescent and re- 
lenting. Next time he should shoot so as to arouse her 
displeasure. 

ST. LOUIS street railway employes have displayed 
their peculiar intelligence by striking again. Possi- 
bly the few brains they possessed in the beginning have 
been clubbed out. 



IT is to be hoped that the papers engaged in defending 
the Caf6 Royal are governed by pure motives. To be 
sure, this would argue them chumps, but it might leave 
them with moral parts unscathed. 

SN injunction has been issued to prevent a Los Angeles 
paper from changing its politics, yet the unbiased 
observer will admit that any Los Angeles paper, propos- 
ing a change of any sort, should be encouraged. 

IT is somewhat of a reflection upon the community that 
the late Dr. Cogswell had to die to receive courteous 
treatment. While living his charities were accepted, but 
there was always a sneer for his harmless eccentricity. 



IN all probability the picture, put porting to be a photo- 
graph, of a victim of fire on the Saale trying vainly to 
escape from a porthole, is a fake. There are times and 
conditions that would check even the most unreasoning 
kodak fiend. 

THE Oklahoma man on trial for a murder committed 
29 years ago would not have felt so securr all this 
time had he known that the brother of his victim was to 
develop into a millionaire with money to burn in the cause 
of justice. 

ELEVEN American soldiers were killed last week by 
misguided Filipinos, who not having read the papers, 
did not know that the war was over. Every transport 
that arrives has been the scene of abuses or has a con- 
siderable number of liars m its cargo. 

THAT once prosperous industry, opium smuggling, is 
likely to be revived again on a large scale. The Fed- 
eral Government has decided to encourage it by with- 
drawing the nightly customs patrol, and Chinatown is 
jubilant. Now, there is nothing to prevent a ship arriv- 
ing in the night from dropping overboard any quantity of 
opium, which can be picked up afterwards by confeder- 
ates. In the past both whites and Mongolians have made 
large fortunes at this game, and the opportuuity of re- 
newing it is too tempting to be neglected. 

FATHER YORKE'S statement about the prosperity 
of Ireland has received remarkable confirmation by 
the success of Plunket's co-operative scheme. Agricul- 
ture is flourishing all through the unhappy island, new in- 
dustries are springing up in all directions, and there is, it 
appears, danger of the people forgetting all about their 
desire for Home Rule. This, coming on top of the glorifi- 
cation of the Irish soldier in the South African campaign, 
gives the coup de grace to the political agitators on both 
sides of the Atlantic, who for years have striven to foment 
dissent and disorder in the Emerald Isle. 



THE leading hotel managers of this city have been put- 
ting their heads together in anxious conference in 
order to devise means to overcome a serious difficulty 
which now confronts them. They are fearful that the ex- 
ample of Staides, who hired one of the best rooms at the 
Palace to die in, may be followed by others of the mor- 
bidly minded who desire to "finish in style," as Kipling 
puts it. It is hard to see what they are goiDg to do about 
it. Any crank with a few dollars in his pocket, provided 
he is decently dressed, can secure the best room in any 
hotel, and no one can prevent his committing suicide in 
any way he likes. The practice of hiring a room to die in 
has long been common, but hitherto it has been confined 
to the cheaper hotels and lodging houses, where the gas 
route provides an easy and efficacious means of exit from 
this vale of tears. In the first-class hotels there is no 
gas, and either poison or the pistol must be depended upon. 
Even as it is, a great many of the so-called gas suicides 
are in reality due to accident or Ignorance. Many cases 
of gas poisoning are to be attributed to the almost crimi- 
nal economy of the cheap hotel-keepers. To save a few 
cents they turn the gas off from the bedrooms for several 
hours during the night. Many a man, from one cause or 
another, goes to bed without turning his light out. The 
result is that the flame dies out when the thrifty hotel- 
keeper turns his gas off, and in the morning, when the 
supply is renewed, the sleeper goes to a painless death. 
He is buried in a suicide's grave, and people wonder why 
he made away with himself. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 



W 



E hear the sullen bark of guns 
From distant Asiatic seas, 
We hear our brothers cry among 
The bloody hordes of cruel Chinese. 

We see the puny yellow men 

Grow mighty with the strength of hate 
We see the sights of butchery 

Behind Pekin's forbidden gate. 

How many nations see their flags 

By clamoring heathen torn and stained. 

Invested dignity despoiled 
And dearer womanhood profaned? 

Such are the signs by which we know 
That holy men have spread again 

God's herald-message to the world 
Of "Peace on earth, good will to men." 



CHRETIEN THE CROOK. 

JOHN M. CHRETIEN, as crooked a lawyer as ever 
dishonored his profession, has confessed. With cow- 
ardly heroics he has taken the blame of everything upon 
himself — that was his last play. It now remains for the 
officers of the law to find a charge upon which he may be 
legally convicted, for he is a self-confessed scoundrel, 
forger, thief, and robber of the dead. A decade or more 
ago a man was hanged in the town of Oakland, California, 
because he had hired other men to do murder. He was 
hanged. Can it be that this man Chretien, whose record 
from the time he introduced a blackleg into a gentlemen's 
club, and was exposed by the News Letter, has been a 
stench in the nostrils of decent society, will be permitted 
to go free through any technicality of the law. Chretien 
induced his negro servant to forge. The crime is double 
and the penalty ought to be double. Chretien is a crook. 
Crook is a gross, jarring word, but it is descriptive when 
used in the same sentence with this shifty scoundrel. 
Here is a man with an accomplished and talented wife, a 
woman of letters, whose name is respected in the com- 
munity. Through thick and thin she has stuck to this 
rascal as only a woman can, and he has repaid her only as 
a blackguard would do. His confession is merely a plea 
for mercy, which we hope will never be granted. It is a 
pleasure to pay taxes to support jails when they house 
such fellows as this. The confession was forced, it was 
the last grand-stand play of an unscrupulous actor, and it 
involves others in anything but a pretty way. 

Judge Troutt, who appointed Chretien as the repre- 
sentative of the absent heir, was elected tu office through 
the influence of Martin Kelly, an unspeakable politician. 
Kelly owned the convention and nominated Troutt. Chre- 
tien has long been known as Martin Kelly's officeboy. It 
was he who took the messages in and brought the mes- 
sages back for the waiting Kelly at the conventions. 
Reuf, a lawyer whose reputation is anything but a 
b uquet, is Martin Kelly's personal representative. It is 
said that R>-uf suggested Chretien as the attorney to 
represent the absent heir. Now, Chretien's reputation was 
so well known as to have made it impossible for Judge Troutt 
to be unconscious of the kind of a man he was selecting for 
a responsible trust. Body-snatchers are not the best 
watchers of the dead. And so through weakness or politi- 
cal pressure Judge Troutt has put himself in anything but 
a dignifled position. Far be it from the News Letter to 
insinuate that Judge Troutt has shared in any of the 
pecuniary rewards of this crime, but it was he who put 
the wrong man in the place, who made it possible for the 
City of San Francisco to suffer a scandal that is now notori- 
ous the nation over. But we would concern ourselves with 
the real culprit rather than the Judge who has been an in- 
strument in the hands of others. Chretien has confessed; 
for the first time in his life he has sworn away the reputa- 
tion of the right man. His confession may be a pose, in 
it many important details may be omitted, but 
there is enough sincerity in it to send any 
thief to jail, and this man ought to be put out 
of sight of honest people. We pay our compliments to 
the Call, which had the enterprise and courage to secure 
the first positive evidence of Chretien's guilt and make it 



known to the world. When journalism concerns itself in 
driving rogues from the pathway of honest folk it is 
good journalism and deserves the respect of the public. 

WHERE ARE WE AT? 

THERE never was a declaration of war against the 
Filipinos. Why ? Because up to the breaking out of 
hostilities there was an understanding in force that there 
should be mutual assistance and friendly alliance. Con- 
gress has since lent its sanction to nothing that has oc- 
cured, or is occurring, although before its meeting, Presi- 
dent McKinley said that the future of the Philippines was 
reserved for Congress to decide. That body in its turn 
relegated the whole matter back to McKinley, and he 
sent it on to the Philadelphia Convention, which practi- 
cally said nothing but "trust the President." Well may 
we ask: Where are we at? Nobody is responsible for 
anything, and everybody is for trusting, not Congress, 
not the people, but the President. Why not make him 
king or emperor at once, and be done with it? If we look 
to the mouthpiece of the administration for information, 
we find one of the smoothest of them saying: "The Re- 
publican party of McKinley proposes to make our depen- 
dencies neither subjects nor citizens. It proposes, as fast 
as it is safe to do so, to make them self-governing, self- 
sustaining, and independent; serving notice on the nations 
of the world that they must not touch the infants." This 
is all very good, and would have been excellent if put into 
the party platform. It miabt be asked how this laudable 
intention can well be served by smashing and killing the 
first promising native Government that shows its head? 
And now comes Mr. Roosevelt and talks in quite another 
strain. He said in Kansas the other day: "Our flag is 
up in the Philippines, and it shall never come down. The 
islands have come under our jurisdiction, and we shall 
keep them. The question of expansion has settled itself." 
Why, then, does not Mr. McKinley himself say so, and not 
have his supporters declaring that black is white and that 
white is no color at all? We think that before they are 
long together Roosevelt will be building more platforms 
than McKinley can run upon. 



ADMIRAL KEMPFF'S COURSE. 

WHEN it was learned in this country that Rear- Admiral 
Kempff had declined to take part in the destruction 
of the Chinese forts at Taku, there was a disposition in 
this country to criticise him harshly. It now turns out 
that he was the one level-headed man among the many 
commanders present. The news to date is clear enough 
to render it very apparent that the attacking of the 
Chinese forts so incensed the loyal Chinese, who were 
previously well disposed, into allies of the Boxers, infuri- 
ated the Pekin mob, and was the primary cause of what- 
ever has happened there since. All this might have been 
foreseen, and was foreseen by Admiral Kempff. Such 
aggression was ill advised so long as the foreign ministers 
were still at Pekin, and Seymour's small force was en- 
deavoring to reach them. His failure resulted, and the 
death of the foreign ministers probably followed. No 
more sagacious course was ever pursued at a trying time, 
than that adopted by Admiral Kempff. He has saved his 
country the discredit of having precipitated the war upon 
China. He deserves the thanks of Congress and the 
gratitude of his countrymen. Yet, without waiting to 
learn the local conditions, the Administration at once 
ordered Admiral Remey at Manila to supersede him. and 
at this moment a gallant, and sagacious American officer 
stands humiliated before the allied fleets of the world I 



THE MEAGRE SALARY OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT. 

THE Brookl.-n Eagle plainly but bluntly tells the 
reason why Mr. Roisevelt did not want to take the 
Vice-Presidential nomination. He si-nplv has not the 
means to fill the position acceptably. It is stated that 
the principal reason why he and his closest friends ob- 
jected to his taking the nomination was that his slender 
means, together with the meagre official salary, would not 
enable him to keep up the dignity of the place. The Vice- 
Presidency is the second office in the government. The 
incumbent of it is made a man of distinction by virtue of 
his office. He is expected and, indeed, required to keep 



July 14, 1900. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



up an establishment and entertain on a scale that should 
be second only to that of the President. He can not doit, 
or begin to do it, on the salary of the office. It is stated 
that Mr. Roosevelt's private income does not exceed 
a a year. His official salary as Vice-President would 
be $-,000 more. With both sums combined he could not 
entertain as be should do without running in debt. So 
high a state officer should not be subjected to either the 
humiliation of parsimony or of borrowing. At Albany the 
Governor receives a salary of $10,000 a year, with the oc- 
cupancy of the furnished executive mansion and the pay- 
ment by law of some of the expenses of housekeeping. 
Yet Mr. Roosevelt found it necessary to resort to liter- 
ary work in order to increase his income. He has six chil- 
dren to provide for and educate according to his station 
in life. His books and magazine articles, among which are 
his "History of the War in Cuba," his "Estimate of Crom- 
well and His Times," his "Heroes of theNavyFrom the Be- 
ginning of the Government," his "Winning of the West," 
etc., represent an amount of study, preparation and hard 
work that ought not to be expected as a means of decent 
livelihood from the Governor of the great Empire State, 
or of the occupant of the Vice-Presidential chair. His 
duties are not of that kind, besides it does not look well 
for the Vice-President to be competing for the bread and 
butter naeded by the poor scribe of the period. The right 
thing to do. whoever is elected, is to raise the official 
salary to $25,000 and give the incumbent a residence and 
allowances. It is certainly not disproportionate to give 
the second officer of the government half as much as the 
first. The cases of individuals illustrate the need of the 
action advocated, but the matter is not one of individuals. 
It is one of justice, of decency and of the nation. 



CONDITIONS AT CAPE NOME. 

THE thirty thousand people gathered at Cape Nome 
are passing through worse conditions than were known 
at our early mining camps, which is saying not a little. 
In the first place the golden sands of the seashore are well 
nigh exhausted, and no pay country has been so far dis- 
covered at the back of them. Of course, in time, there will 
be both alluvial and quartz mining, because the gold 
washed out on the beach must have come from somewhere. 
But that is a matter of capital and of exploration, for 
which the host at present there is in no manner prepared. 
Want, distress and crimes of violence had taken such pos- 
session of the place that Captain Handle had to establish 
military government, proclaim martial law and enforce it 
with the few soldiers of his command. That officer seems 
to have acted promptly, wisely and well, and saved the 
place from becoming a hell upon earth. Every man is 
leaving who can pay his way out, which the great majority 
cannot do. We very much suspect that a cry will pres- 
ently arise for the government to send transports to take 
the starving people away. Governments have done such 
things before, and there exists many precedents for the 
course suggested. To make matters worse smallpox in 
an epidemic form has broken out, and there is need for 
medical assistance. That these misfortunes will not kill 
the gambling spirit that is at the bottom of mining rushes 
goes without saying. The very same men would start out 
on another fool expedition to-morrow if the reports were 
only exhilarating enough. 

ANDREW LAWRENCE'S GODSPEED. 

THE News Letter has never concealed its unfavorable 
opinion of the Yellow Examiner and some of its 
editors, but in the interest of fair play and journalistic 
decency cannot allow to pass unnoticed the meanest piece 
of blackguardism we have ever seen, that was printed at the 
expense of Managing Editor Andrew M. Lawrence. This 
young man was not particularly popular while in San 
Francisco, but when he left here to take the position in 
Chicago even his enemies could have afforded to have said, 
"Good luck to you," or to allow his departure to pass in 
silence. But it remained for the editor of the Bulletin to 
make a vicious and brutal attack on Mr. Lawrence, in 
which a number of things were charged that could not 
possibly be true and many assertions made that are not 
susceptible of proof. It was not so much, however, what 
the Bulletin said but the time and manner of its publica- 
tion. Certainly the relations between Lawrence and his 



employer are not likely to be known in the Bulletin office. 
The proprietor of the Examiner has at least the reputa- 
tion of the strongest possible loyalty to his employees. 
No one has ever known an occasion where he permitted 
them to be discredited. The trouble seems to be that the 
Bulletin editor is very much what he wants the people to 
believe the Examiner editor was — a man who desires his 
own way, works for his own ends and attacks all who 
stand in bis path. Considering the vicissitudes of the 
business, considering the extreme likelihood that the 
editor of a newspaper to-day will be occupying an ex- 
tremely humble position to-morrow, we are surprised that 
the editor of the Bulletin should make such an attack on 
a journalist occupying a similar position to his own. It is 
thissorttf personal blackguardism tbatdiscredits the press 
of San Francisco and makes men say they do not care for 
the acquaintance of newspaper men. It is this sort of 
thing that relegates the newspaper profession to a lowlier 
position than it ought to occupy. It is this sort of thing 
that robs newspapers of influence they might otherwise 
possess; for instead of fighting the common enemy, each 
seems bent on negativing his own influence by destroying 
the influence of another. 



THE PORT AND THE SAILOR. 

SAN FRANCISCO has always enjoyed an enviable 
reputation amongst nautical men as a most trouble- 
some and expensive seaport to visit. Not only are the 
port charges unduly high, but there are often tedious de- 
lays in loading and unloading, due to the crowded state of 
the docks. Worst of all, however, is the trouble with the 
sailors, thanks to the license granted boarding-house mas- 
ters and their attendant harpies. These men are allowed 
to board ships and steal their crews with impunity, and 
often, indeed, sailors are taken away by sheer force, 
against their will. Practically, then, every foreign going 
ship which comes here loses her crew, and is detained for 
weeks in the stream before she can ship another one. 
Blood money, often running as high as $40 or $50 a head, 
is demanded by the rascally boarding bouse masters, in 
addition to a high rate of wages. This state of affairs re- 
flects no credit on the port authorities and does great 
harm to the California producer, who has to pay for it all 
in the long run, owing to the increased rate of freight 
demanded here. If the State officials are powerless, then 
the Federal authorities should step in. The Immigration 
Commissioner can, if he chooses, prevent the landing of 
any sailor until he has undergone the requisite examina- 
tion and shown that he is not a pauper. There is plenty 
of law to deal with the question if only some one could be 
found to enforce it. 

PROBATE COURT AFFAIRS 

THE shocking scandal that has broken out in Judge 
Troutt's Court during the week is not a surprise 
to this journal, which long ago predicted that some- 
thing of the kind was liable to happen. Judge Troutt we 
believe to be a well-intentioned and personally honest 
Judge, who, however, does not possess back bone enough 
to stand-off the insidious harpies who prey upon dead 
men's estates. It takes Judge Coffey to do that, and there- 
in consists the grounds for suspicion of recent probate 
proceedings. Judge Coffey for years did all of the pro- 
bate work, and satisfied everybody, exceptcertain hungry 
lawyers, that he was the very man for the place. His 
capacity to detect wrong, and his courage to rebuke it, 
caused him to be detested by estate-wrecking lawyers, 
and soon there was a movement on foot to have the pro- 
bate business divided up among other judges. The succ ess 
of that movement marks the beginning of an evil that has 
just culminated in the Chretien case. That man's 
character was notorious long before it was publicly ex- 
posed, and ought to have been suspected by any coui t be- 
fore which he practiced. It is Judge Troutt's misfortune 
to have many of the same kind around him to day, whom 
he cannot too soon find out. All the probate cases ought, 
in the first instance, to be sent to Judge Coffey, who is 
the regular probate judge, and if there be more than he 
can try, he can easily refer some of them back to the 
presiding judge. The public have confidence in Judge 
Coffey. Much more might be said upon this subject, but 
it will keep for the present. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14. 1900. 



NOT IN A STATE OF WAR. 

iT is agreed in Washington and in the capitals of Europe 
that a state of war does not exist in China, because 
the direct responsibility of the Imperial Government for 
the resistance to the international relief columns, and for 
the folly of the Taku commander, has not been avowed. 
Prom all of which it would seem that there are as many 
technicalities in diplomacy as there are in law. If the 
powers are not at war with China, tbey are certainly not 
at peace, and tbpy cannot be so long as the actual fate of 
the legations in Pekin is unknown, so long as their com- 
munications with their home Governments are kept broken 
by imperial officers, so long as outrages on foreigners go 
unchecked or unpunished. A state of peace that is ac- 
companied by the capture of the Taku forts and the bom- 
bardment of the commercial city of Tien Tsin is, to say 
the least, ridiculously anomalous. It is worth recalling 
that China is not very much given to "declaring her in- 
tentions" in regard to war. C*Dly once in her history has 
she made a formal declaration of war, and that proved so 
great a mistake that she is not likely to adopt it as a 
precedent. That was in 1895, when Japan taught her a 
lesson she ought not so soon to have forgotton. The opium 
war with England, the Anglo-French war of 1860, and 
the French war in Tonquin in 1885 were conducted and 
concluded without any formal announcement of hostilities. 
But this is pre-eminently a case in which acts speak louder 
than words. If the wiping out of the foreign legations be 
not an occasion when the dogs of war may righteously be 
let slip, then it would be hard to say what act justifies a 
resort to arms. It is being contended in some quarters 
that the Pekin Government is not responsible for the 
deeds of the people it claims to govern but does not rule. 
That is nonsense. If a Government cannot protect the 
foreign ambassadors within its capital, it is not in any 
sense of the term a Government at all. The long and 
short of the matter is, China has got to be severely pun- 
ished for what has happened, and in administering that 
punishment the United States is bound in honor to take 
part. The correspondence of Minister Conger shows that 
we are fully committed to that extent. After that is ac- 
complished the grave question will arise as to the future 
disposition and Government of China, but that is a stream 
we had better not try to cross until we come to it. It 
happens to be quite full of snags. This much, however, is 
certain: that a country yet without railroads, that has 
doubled its foreign trade within ten years, and with which 
the export trade of the United States has increased three- 
fold within seven years, is hardly a market we can afford 
to view with indifference. If the question resolves itself 
into one as between "an open door" and "spheres of in- 
fluence," there need be no doubt as to the direction in 
which our interest lies. 

THE ARMY CANTEEN IN POLITICS. 

THE army canteen is going to give President McKinley 
a good deal of trouble before the campaign is over. 
The strong resolutions recently passed by the principal 
religious denominations, have had the effect of bringing 
the subject once more to the front. The leading temper- 
ance organ, published in Chicago, breaks out in this some- 
what fanatical style: "The drunkenness and debauchery 
that have followed the canteen everywhere, the undis- 
guisable fact that it does not accomplish a single one of 
the results claimed for it by its friends; the concurrent 
testimony of such officers as Howard, Wheeler, Sternberg 
and Shatter against it, are too much matters of public 
knowledge for these late day defenders of the army saloon 
to succeed in deluding the public. The stand taken by 
the War Department merely shows that the Administra- 
tion has determined to call 'evil good,' and 'good, evil,' 
and to risk its fate on that issue. When the votes are 
counted they will learn of their fearful mistake." On the 
other band, the military journals are equally emphatic in 
maintaining that the "canteens are bulwarks of sobriety, 
because they tend to keep the soldiers out of the low 
groggeries." The Army and Navy Gazette (Washington), 
which ought to be somewhat of an authority, says that 
"the official records show that the canteens have improved 
the discipline of the army, reduced the number of deser- 
tions, decreased trials by court martials for petty 



offenses and induced a greater degree of sobriety." All 
of which the friends of the army will hope to be true. 
Between the extreme statements of the prohibitionists on 
the one side and of the old army topers on the other, it is 
bard to say just where the truth lies. It happens that 
General Sir George White, the defender of Ladysmitb, 
and General Lord Roberts have just been delivering them- 
selves on this subject. Tbey are both total abstainers, as 
are a very large proportion of the officers and men of the 
British Army. General White recently presided at a 
meeting of the British Army Temperance Association of 
which he is President in succession to Lord Roberts. He 
said "that of the 70,000 British soldiers in India, fully 
25,000 were members of the association, and he had been 
struck with the fact of the marvelously greater number 
of offenders among men who took liquor than among those 
who did not." He further said that temperance rooms 
had been added to the barracks throughout India, with 
excellent results. The best weapon, he said, for fighting 
the ennui which contributes so largely to immoderate 
drinking, is the providing of agreeable quarters where 
soldiers can have a good time without recourse to either 
the outside saloon or the inside canteen. A letter was 
read from Lord Roberts paying a tribute to the fighting 
and marching qualities of the temperance men in his army. 
It should be understood that these two high authorities 
are talking about free will abstinence, and not legal pro- 
hibition which is a very different matter. 



PEACE IN THE PHILIPPINES. 

IT is already very apparent that it will be helpful to the 
McKinley Campaign if he can patch up a peace with 
the Filipinos between now and November next. For that 
reason we think he will do it. The conference held re- 
cently between General McArthur, and a large number of 
representative Filipinos seems to be the beginning of the 
desired end. To be sure Aguinaldo was not a party to 
the conference, but his friends and followers were, and 
they gave assurances that their decisiDn would be 
accepted by the Tagal Chief. That General McArthur 
was acting under home instructions and desired the 
success of the conference, was rendered evident by his 
release of influential Filipino prisoners in order that they 
might attend the proceedings, which were so harmonious, 
except on one subject, as to give rise to the belief that 
there had been a prior understanding. The bone of con- 
tention relates to the demand for the expulsion of the 
Friars. All intelligent observers in the Philippines agree 
that there can be no peace there so long as the Friars re- 
main. But the United States cannot, by the treaty of 
Paris, interfere with the religious orders or their prop- 
erty. As this journal pointed out at the time, it was a 
most unwise stipulation to enter into. It should be gotten 
rid of by condemnation and compensation, or in some 
equitable way. The United States would in the end be 
recouped by the sale of the lands to the natives. 



GOVERNING IN HAWAII. 

THE little band of planters who virtually govern 
Hawaii are often hard-set to make their little schemes 
stick. Those of the natives who have votes have organ- 
ized a party of their own which proposes to render all 
Governments impracticable that do not recognize the old 
monarchy in some way. The powers of obstruction are 
great, and the native party has a few able leaders. Their 
proposed course may be very sullen, stupid and unprofit- 
able on their part, but it is exceedingly natural under 
the circumstances. Then the revenue of the islands is in 
a bad way. It amounts to virtually nothing, and there is 
no way of increasing it under existing laws. There can be 
no tariff on the goods of the only country that supplies 
the Hawaiian market. The only alternative seems to be 
a land tax that would not suit the planters and might 
make them wish they had better understood all the possi- 
bilities of annexation. The engineer is sometimes hoist 
with his own petard. 

Comet de Orient. 
Cigarette de Lnxe— finest Turkish tobacco. At M. Blaskowkr t 
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July t4. 1900. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEh. 

T5he SEASIDE WIFE AND 

Bhe JEALOUS HUSBAND 



By REGINALD EOMUYLER. 

I DON'T know wby, but most of my correspondence, 
which is considerable, comes from women. Men write 
me gratuito'is letters now and then, but theirs are gener- 
ally antagonistic, something in the nature of a protest, if 
not an absolute insult. But here in my morning's mail I 
have a note from a man that is the very Liebig's extract 
of sincerity. As usual, I shall not divulge the writer's 
name. If anybody is going to be ridiculous in this column, 
I prefer playing the part myself. 

My unknown friend confesses that he is aarried, that 
he works as hard as any of the ideal American husbands 
that I described several issues back, and sends his wife 
away to the country punctually every summer. He tells 
me serious but not interesting details about dressmakers' 
bills, and he owns up to the fact that he is jealous of his 
wife's conduct during her absence. "I am a plain man of 
fifty," says he, "and my wife is only thirty-two. We have 
no children and she is very beautiful. She is, I fear, a 
little of a flirt. She says that I am the only thing she. 
ever took seriously in this life, and that she does not 
think much of seriousness. While I am a man of means, I 
still find it difficult to get away from my business. The 
best I can do is to eoj >y what you describe as the Satur- 
day-to-Monday. She meets me at the station every Sat- 
urday afternoon with a smile and a kiss. But somehow I 
feel that during the earlier part of the week she has been 
enjoying the society of younger men much more than she 
would have enjoyed her husband's." 

And the good gentleman goes on to tell me that he wor- 
ried about several young blades who seemed to have be- 
come very well acquainted with his wife considering the 
short time she had been at this summer resort, which for 
obvious reasons 1 shall not mention by name. To make a 
short story short, our friend is suffering from the common 
or garden variety of jealousy. He is not exactly Decem- 
ber and she is more than M-iy; but there are years be- 
tween them that coutt. He fears the attraction that 
younger men may hold for her; and she, I imagine, is a 
healthy, pleasure-loving soul, who dreads jealousy. A 
young man's jealousy is a compliment, an old man's a 
bore. Some men are young and others old at the half 
centuiy. This one, I fancy, is old. The very fact that he 
has lost self-confidence and will write to me, a public 
stranger, about his anxieties, shows that he is wearing 
his fifty years with a very bad grace. 

My advice to all married men is to give their wives a 
little more freedom than they ask for; to toady a bit to 
their pleasures; above all, not to interfere with the natu- 
ral, wholesome social enthusiasm of youth, which some- 
times lasts even unto the thirty-second year. No woman of 
normal instinct cares to be "the bird in a gilded cage." 
Woman in her way is just as chummy, just as clubable as 
man. The notion that she is just good enough to hold down 
one end of the dinner table and to bear children is enter- 
tained only by the ladies of the women's clubs and a few 
over-dry husbands. The ladies— Ood bless 'em— deserve 
their pleasure just as much as we husky men deserve ours. 
If I had a wife to send to the country I would consider her 
insulted if a few decent chaps did not make the hours easy 
for her in ray absence. 

It takes a single man to talk about these things in the 
real spirit. He has no prejudice and the benefit of every- 
body else's experience. Drive your wife with a loose rein, 
Mr. Man, and perhaps she will think she is driving you. 
Then you'll both be happy. Life is too long and lovely to 
be spoiled by the yellow imp of jealousy. The one way to 
make a woman believe you trust her is to trust her. Be 
big and broad, and let her small diversions amuse rather 
than jar you. Use a little tact and a lot of unselfish de- 
votion, and she will think that you are the noblest work 
of God— which I hope you are. 

The human skin is sensitive ; bad cosmetics scar it. Camelline 
not only beautifies bat soothes. It is used by Adelina Patti, Ellen 
Terry and Mrs. Kendall and thousands of others. 



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Principal 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 




Vhasurels 
Wand 



CJeohty no wand but Pleasure 's . ^ 



ftT the Columbia Theatre this week Henry Miller and 
his company have been reviving one of the most ar- 
tistic successes of last year, A Marriage of Convenience, 
adapted from the French with facile art by Sydney 
Grundy. The play has been reviewed before in these 
columns and it is not necessary to sing again its praises. It 
is a clean, picturesque work of art, a play that takes us 
out of ourselves and harks back to the graceful past in 
which good manners and good clothes were not confined en- 
tirely to the women. Mr. Miller has been very modest 
this season as far as himself is concerned. In Miss Eobbs 
and in The Tree of Knowledge he cast himself in roles that 
gave but very little vent to his real particularity and 
special accomplishment. He was content to be the man- 
ager, to give us what were almost faultless productions 
from a scenic, stage managerial and actorial standpoint. 
In the present piece the whol j show is his, and I doubt me 
if there are many men on the English-speaking stage who 
could play the part of the Co nte as Mr. Miller does. 

He is a formal actor, he does nothing spontaneously, he 
has no warmth of magnetism to grip you by the spine and 
ccmpel you to sit up to take notice; but he has a careful, 
honest art that wears well, and a clean personality that 
while it does not burn is always amiable, gentlemanly and 
attractive. One is quite sure that Mr. Miller will not do 
the wrong thing, that he will always be tactful. Acting, 
with him, is perhaps a trade rather than an inspiration, 
but he has learned his trade in a good school, and learned 
it well. I have nothing but compliments for Mr. Miller's 
performance as the Comte de Candale. It is perhaps 
rigid in p.aces, perhaps lacking in those qualities of en- 
thusiasm that break down the barrier of reserve between 
the footlights and the audience, but it is a good, sincere 
figure, conceived in the right mood, attuned to the inten- 
tion of the auihor, and rich with technical graces. 

Of Mr. Worthing's characterization of the Cheva'ier I 
cannot say as much. Worthing is a natural actor in 
whom the human qualities predominate. He has given us 
several characters that thrill, but this time he errs on 
the side of exaggeration. The Chevalier may not be a 
great wit, may not be a man of consummate tact and 
courage, but he is not what Mr. Worthing makes him out 
to be, a lobster — if I may employ one of the most descrip- 
tive words of the hour. Certainly he is born and bred a 
gentleman, and his deportment should be in accordance. 
I suppose that an actor-critic would say that Worthing is 
doing a very fine, generous thing in caricaturing his part 
to umpbasize the delicacy and elegance of Mr. Miller's. 
But in my esteem the contrast need not be so severe to 
point the grace of one and the awkwardness of another. 

Miss Anglin plays another pretty trioute to her variety 
in the part of the Comtesse. She, too, is a natural actor, 
and this time she lives up to it. To be natural and ai the 
same time to present a figure of reality in the customs 
and costumes of bygone centuries is no easy trick. 
Margaret Dale improves while you wait. Her personality 
is comfortable as well as unique. She has the style that 
tells. 

The tailor and the scene painter and the stage manager 
play big parts in this production, and play them beauti- 
fully. 

* # * 

Norma Whalley's debut as a full-fledged actress was 
celebrated at the California Theatre last Sunday nigbt, 
when she appeared with Dunne and Ryley's comedians as 
the principal character in A Contented Woman. Miss 
Whalley had her good looks with her; they are always 
with her. They are the one lone specialty that excuses 
her appearance on any stage. She wore them well. She 
riveted the willing audience with those piercing eyes of 
hers. When she smiled the crowd was glad. I had 
thought that putting Norma Whalley in this role was 
nothing short of a practical joke on the part of the 



audience, but now I believe it was good business happily 
prearranged with seduction aforethought. The Johnnies 
turned out in mobs and applauded Miss Whalley's worst 
endeavor. There were none too rich to do her reverence 
in the most absurd moment. As an actress she is possibly 
the worst that ever happened. There is more life in a 
statue and a better voice in a phonograph. But as a 
piece of scener" she is a record to remember. Mathews, 
Bulgi r, Tony Hart, Bessie Tannehill, Mary Marble were 
among the also acted. They are clever but not beautiful, 
and on the present sumptuous occasion deserve only a 
passing praise. Let them have it. 
* • « 
Sadie Martinot became a bright particular of the Mil- 
ler crmpany on the instant of her first appearance as 
the adventuress in The Tree of Knowledge. This success 
has called to the mind of several readers of the News 
Letter a failure of equal enthusiasm: Rice's Excelsior Jr., 
in which Miss Martinot appeared at the Columbia several 
years ago. I had the audacity to "write up" the per- 
formance in a bad breed of doggerel parody, and at the 
"special request" of several readers I am fool enough to 
reprint it: — 

The shades of night were falling fast, 

As through a Western village passed 

A show that bore the name of Kice 

On playbills with the strange device, 
Excelsior Jr! 

His brow was sad his eye beneath 
Bespoke the critic, and bis wreath 
Of dusky hair proclaimed the same. 
'•To see the show," he said. "I've came — 
Excelsior Jr!" 

"Try not the pass," the old man said ; 
He heeded not. he went dead-bead 
(And took a friend along beside) 
And loud lhat clarion voice replied, 
Excelsior Jr! 

"Oh stay," the maiden said, "and rest 
Thy weary head upon this breast!" 
"Kay, nay." be said, "I'd rather go 
And see sweet Sadie Martinot 
In Excelsior Jr.'" 

" Beware the choruses' withered branch, 
Beware the awful avalanche 
Of doleful song and senile smirk 
And palsied jest and gibe that lurk 
In Excelsior Jr..'*' 

At break of day they found him there, 
Froze fast within his velvet chair, 
Still grasping in bis hand of ice 
The play-bill with that strange device, 
Excelsior Jr. I 

And on its margin this was writ: 
" Once Martinot, now Martinit." 
A tear was frosted in his eye, 
His glacial lips still seemed to sigh, 
Excelsior Jr. I 

Therein the theatre, cold and gray, 
Lifeless, but beautiful, he lay. 
A steamy voice from far below 
Groaned, "Better here than at that Ehow, 
Excelsior Jr.V 



A good play by Henry Arthur Jones entitled The Dan- 
cing Girl has served to entertain the patrons of the Grand 
Opera House. Wilton Lackaye appeared in his original 
role of the Duke, a part that he played with marked suc- 
cess when the play was introduced to San Francisco some 
several years ago at the late Baldwin Theatre. It has 
been played in the meantime by another Frawley Com- 
pany, and Blanche Bates distinguished herself in the title 
role. But the Duke's part never has been played with 
better effect than when Lackaye had it. Put Sothern, 
any one you like in the role, and there is not that 
"strength in weakness" that Lackaye brings out. He is 
cynical without being aggressive, reckless without being 
overposed. I wonder that a man who the week before 
played such an intense character as the old Rabbi in The 
Children of the Ghetto can so immediately swing himself 



July n, 1900. 



HAN FRANCIS! •> HWB LETTKK. 



into the graces of a modern part of youth and fashion. 
Mr. Larkaye is a good actor in almost any part, an ex- 
traordinary actor In strenuous characters, and a fine, 
artistic personality at all times. He doesn't like dramatic 
critics, but that is no reason why they >hould not like hira. 
The support by the others of the New r'rowley Company 
is not up to the mark. Miss Win Buren shows an unex- 
pected pathos in the lame girl, and Frank Mathieu is bet- 
ter than he used to be as the rustic 1 iver, and Mr. Bryant 
is admirable as the fop. But Miss Wakeman and the rest 
will not stand for description. She is the Drusilla Ives, 
and the worst in the world. Her voice is not of this 
earth. My ears still ring from the roar of it, and my eyes 
refuse to forget those padded gestures. 

* • * 

Dunne and Ryley's comedians will put the Hoyt farce- 
comedies on the shelf to-Dight when they present for the 
last time A Conttnttd Woman, and to-morrow night they 
will offer a big revival of At Gay Coney Island, the batch 
of nonsense that served to so successfully introduce 
Matthews and Bulger to San Fran isco two seasons ago. 
Then it made an immense bit, and the present production 
promises to be better and brighter in every particular 
than the first. Matthews and Bulger will appear in their 
original roles of "Dr. Aiken Payne" and "Hi Price," 
Phil Riley will play "Mique La Maque," Tony Hart will 
be "Benson Hurst," and George Wiseman will appear as 
"Noyse E. Barker," who owns the principal side shows at 
Coney Island. Norma Whalley will be "Delia Ware," 
who is left a fortune with the proviso that she marry, and 
consequently weds a man with the understanding that he 
dies in two weeks. Mary Marble will play "Billy Due," 
and Bessie Tannehill, Maude Courtney, Adlyn Estee and 
thirty others will fill the remaining roles. 

* * * 

The present season of comic opera at the Tivoli has but 
two more weeks to run, and then c>mes the grand opera 
season. For the last production of the c imic opera sea- 
son the Tivoli will revive Wang. The cast will include 
Edwin Stevens, Ferris Hartman, Tom Greene, Annie 
Meyers, Grace Orr, William Schuster, Geortrie Cooper, 
Aubrey Davenport and Harry Cashman. On Monday, 
July 30th, the sixth annual season of grand opera will be- 
gin. Among those to be heard a.-e the Signors Salassa 
and Avedano, and Anna Lichter, who return to renew 
their last year's triumphs. The Tivoli will bring from 
Italy Signor Dominico Russo, Signorina Italia Vittoria 
Repetto, Signor Guiseppa Ferrari and Signor Alessandro 

Nicolini. 

* * * 

Lillian Burkhart returns to the Orpheum this week with 
her latest playlet, Captain, Susmne, written for her by 
Brandon Hurst. All the costumes and scenery have been 
procured in San Francisco. In addition to the expense of 
stage equipment Miss Burkhart has devoted some six 
weeks to acquiring the use of the foils, and in Captain 
Susanne she will demonstrate not only her ability as an 
actress but her recently acquired ski 1 as aswordswoman. 
Williamson and Stone are black face comedians who will 
introduce some novelties. John Donohue and Miss Mattie 
Nichols will present an amusing sketch. 

* * * 

At the Columbia Theatre on Monday evening Henry 
Miller will revive Henry Arthur Jones' comedy The Liars. 
This piece, like its predecessors of this season, will hold 
the boards for but six nights and Wednesday and Satur- 
day matinees notwithstanding the fact that the sale is al- 
ready so large as to assure capacity testing audiences 
throughout the week. It will be remembered that Miller 
opened his season here last year with this interesting 
and charming comedy on English society life and it proved 
a fine introduction to a very successful season. It is 
definitely announced that Henry Miller will produce The 
Only Way during the week commencing Monday, July 23d. 

* * * 

At Fischer's Concert H >use, Lenore White, assisted by 
Blanche Husted and Frank Clayton, will present her 
sketch, Autumn Lravis, next week. Edward Adams, 
comedian; Coral Thorndike, soprano; Lena Johnson, vio- 

inist; Isabelle Underwood, contralto, and Edi-.on's Pro- 

ectoscope will also be on the programme. 



Columbia Theatre. 



tlOTTl.011. Mill A ' 

! < ■ »« and Muuw«r«. 



IWInnlnr MAtHnjr. .ttllr Ir.th. Inurlh w*.k ol Ihc •€•• 

nlrht. and \\ clnc««li\jr And -.liir.li*)' matinee*. Mi.rl. • Fmhman 

HENRY MILLER 

«"<•«-[' U ■" 1**1 "Ciwoti'i arc at cimcriy miocm*. 

THE LIARS 
By Ilrnry Arthur .loncn. ThurmUy, July IMh— Fir- 1 Bofiofl 
HolltiM l-ctUir© Mntlncc. 
July 23*1 — First time lure. Tin: osi.v W\v. 



C -».:•£*.».-* TL«U Tnn popular house. 
3 1 1 TO r n I a I nea Xre . Reservation* by 'Phono. Main 1731 

(■•■mmcnHni; Stittdny night, July IMh, MhUIkmvb .V Bulger. In 
OOnJauOtlon frith I'unnc fi Ityley'n nll-slnr oh*1, 111 a grand ri'- 
viv.,1 ol their polite funny piny. 

AT GAY GONEY ISLAND. 

Only matinee Saturday. Popular prices. 
Next week: By the Sad Ska Waves. 

TI../-J. C\~~.— -a r— . «~ Mrs. Ernestine Keeling, 
IVOII VjDera rlOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Lost tiroes, to-night and Sunday night, ol the musical (rem, TUB 
GEISHA. Next Monday, revival of the great opera. 

WANG 

Produced with a wealth of scenic effects. 

Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Special Announcement — Monday. July 3 th, gala opening of the 

On and Opera Season, Watch the papers for full particulars. 

Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



0_ _ L _ . , __ San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, 
r P n e U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and ] 



Powell streets. 



Donahue & Nichols 
Barrere & Jules 



Williamson & Stone 
Smith* Fuller 

MISS LILLIAN BURKHART 

Stella Mayhew Quaker City Quartette 

Clayton White and Marie Stuart, assisted by Miss Eva Randolph 
Reserved Seats 25c.: balcony 10c.; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

£1 I . -, -, a- TL«- i. a- ~ Belabco & Thall, Managers. 

ttlcazar I neatre. Phone. Main 254. 

Week of July 16th. Flohekce Robert*, supported by White 
Whittlesey and the Alcazar Company, in an artistic presenta- 
tion of 

INGOMAR 

Alcazar Prices— 15c, 25c.. 35c, 50c. Only Matinee Saturday 

In preparation— THE C0HRTJRY OIBL. 

Columbia Theatre- -Extra. 

BURTON HOLMES LECTURES 

Direction Henry Miller. Illustrations in colors. Appropriate 
motion pictures. Two courses exactly alike. 

Six Thursday Matint-es at 2:30 
8 x Sunday Evenings at 8*30 
"Manila," July 19th and 22d; "Japan Revisited, "^ July 26th and 
29th; "Round About Paris," August 2d and 5th; "Grand Canon," 
August 9th and 12th; "Moki Land," August 16th and 19th; "Ha- 
waiian Islands," 23d and 26th 
Reserved seats, Si, 75c„ and 50c, ready Monday. 

Fischer's Mew Concert House o-FarreliV 

Beginning Monday, July 16th, E. A. Fischer, Proprietor. 

Lenore V\ hite & Co. in AUTUMN LEAVES; Edward Adams 
Coral Thorndike, Lena Johnson, Isabelle Underwood. 
Admission, 10 cents; reserved seats, 25 cents: matinee Sunday. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string, band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show Is 

over. 




Modern- 

NOB HILL FLAT 

1011 CALIFORNIA ST., Near Mason, 
Opposite Flood Mansion. 
11 looms, 2 bath rooms, large laundry, coal 
bunkers, inlaid floors in drawing rooni, un- 
surpassed view north and south. Four min- 
uies' ride from Kearnv street, six minutes 
from Mart et strtet. Kent $100. Will lease 
to responsible parties. Apply to 

Q. A. BERTON, 323 Montgomery St. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900: 




L ibrary&abk 



_. A youDg American military attache, 

The Conspirators. Lieutenant Gilbert Hardy, is the hero 
of "The Conspirators," the recent novel written by Mr. 
Robert W. Chambers. The young officer tells the story 
himself with considerable dash, and in a most convincing 
way. Prom the very first chapter, where, going from 
Paris to Luxembourg, a fellow-traveler— a Prince in dis- 
guise — takes from him his passport at the point of a pis- 
tol, on to the happy ending, where love rules the court 
and camp, there is no dull page. Those who have read 
Mr. Chambers's ''Lorraine" and "The King in Yellow," 
will remember the writer's crisp, vivacious style and his 
fine blending of irony and humor. In following the peri- 
patetic adventures of the young American diplomat on 
his mission to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the 
reader will make the acquaintance of the Kaiser, under 
the title of William the Sudden, and that of the young 
Queen Wilhelmina. The introduction of these two rulers 
into the story has given rise to much criticism; neverthe- 
less, before the book had been published five weeks it had 
gone through five editions. 

The Conspirators: by Robert W. Chambers. Harper & Brothers, Pub- 
lishers. New York. Price. 81.50. 

The International "The International Year Book," for 
Year Book. 1899, the second of a series, the first 
having been published for the year 
1898, is now ready. It chronicles all the important occur- 
rences of the past twelve months, and what with the war 
in the Transvaal, The Hague Conference, the Alaskan 
Boundary dispute, the settlement of the Pashoda affair, 
the new international status of Japan, the Anglo-Russian 
agreement respecting China, and the new turn in the 
Dreyfus affair, the record of the year 1899 is an unusu- 
ally full one. Much space is devoted to recent important 
discoveries, as well as to the experiments made in munici- 
pal Government. Biographies < f noted people, reviews of 
and comments upon new boons and new plays fill many 
pages. More than a dozen tine maps supplement a book 
that is in every way all that could be desired, for it ful- 
fills a double office: it is at once a valuable annual work 
of reference and a thoroughly up-to-date cyclopaedic ap- 
pendix. Mr. Colby, the author, is Professor of Economics 
in New York University, and has had as his assistant, in 
preparing this comperd um of t he world's progress in 1899, 
the assistance of Mr. Barry Thurston Peck, Professor in 
Columl ia University, and editor-in-chief of the Interna- 
tional Cyclopaedia. 

The International Year Book: by Frank Moore Colby, M. A. Dodd, Mead 
& Co.. Publishers. New York. Price. &S.U0, 



Georgie. 



"Georgie," by S. E Kiser, will only be appre- 



ciated by those who have more than the prover- 
bial spark of humor. They are a series of funny sketches 
with funny illustrations. It is the "small boy" who perpe- 
trates them all and they are all cast in the followingmould: 
"If a person bad their choice of going to heaven or the sir- 
cus I bet it wouldn't take them Long to tell which, except 
mebbe some Of the preachers. I s'pose some of them 
mite hang back pretending they Couldn't make up their 
minds. The sircus was here yesterdy; And paw took me 
and Little albert. 

" 'I alays beleave in letting a boy see the sircus,' paw 
told maw, 'becoz it broddens his mind to See the wunders 
of naitcher and He grows up to be a Better man.' " 

" Maw said she would ruther stay at home becoz she 
hated a crowd. I offen wunder what fun there is in life 
Being a purson's mother and not caring for hardly enny- 
thing with exsitement in it." 

And so "Georgie" runs on through over two hundred 
pages and we frankly confess that Georgie's lucubrations 
do hot appeal to us, possibly because we are lacking in 
the aforesaid proverbial spark of humor. 

■ 'Gcorffie: by S. "E. Kiser. Small, Maynard & Co.. Publishers, Boston. 
PrlceSLOO. 



Nature's "A guide and record for outdoor observations 
Calendar, in natural history," is the sub-title of Mr. 
Ernest Ingersoll's book, "Nature's Calendar." 
The volume is arranged with a page for every day of the 
year, and on each page are wide margins for the reader's 
notes. It teaches what to see and when to see it, and 
the marginalia tempts to the jottiDg down of field-notes 
day by day, thus fixing in the mind "Nature's annual cycle 
of birth, career, death and progeny — seed, olossom fruit- 
age." The illustrations, or "embellishments," as Mr. In- 
gersoll puts it, are extremely well done, and are from the 
original photographs of Mr. Clarence Lown. 

Nature's Calendar: by Ernest Ingersoll. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 
New York. Price. $1.50. 

A Dream of A romance dealing with a popular Mexican 
a Throne, uprising half a century ago, and written by 
Mr. Charles P. Embree, under the title, "A 
Dream of a Throne," has just been issued. The writer's 
thorough knowledge of Mexican life has enabled him to 
draw very realistic pictures of many interesting spots, 
and the descriptions of scenery at Lake Chapala are full 
of color. The story is a dramatic one. 

A Dream of a Throne: by Charles Flemine Embree. Little, Brown & Co., 
Publishers. Boston. Priee, $1.50. 

The July number of "Personal Impressions" is quite up 
to its usual meritorious standard. Mr. Arnold Genthe 
has an interesting article on the possibilities of the cam- 
era; Mr. Charles Keeler writes appreciatively of some of 
California's galaxy of writers. Of Charles P. Lummis, 
John Muir, Joaquin Miller, Edward Rowland Sill, Charles 
Warren Stoddard, Emma Francis Dawson, Ina Coolbrith, 
and President Jordan he speaks in high praise and pre- 
dicts that here, if anywhere, "can develop a literature 
which is individual and vital, yet universal in Its interest 
and significance." Mr. Garnett has a brief review of Ib- 
sen's "When the Dead Awaken," and Professor Gilman's 
"Life of James Dwight Dana" is touched upon. 

The "Impression" leaflets recently published by Messrs. 
Elder & Shepard are meeting with high commendation. 
They are simple, but rich in suggestion, aud should find a 
place in every home. Art need no longer be the luxurious 
possession of the elect, fortunately, and the laudable pro- 
ject of these two bookmen with keen literary judgment 
and fine artistic perception is a move in the right direc- 
tion. The leaflets are printed in three colors, with origi- 
nal capitals, and the series up-to-date comprises an ex- 
tract from the "Christmas Sermon" of Robert Louis Stev- 
enson, Emily Dickinson's 'He Ate and Drank the Precious 
Words," "My Symphony," by William Henry Channing, 
'The Worldly Wisdom of Noureddin Ali," from the "Ara- 
bian Nights," and some words of wisdom by Regina E. 
Wilson, entitled: "Impressions of an Optimist." D. P. 
Eider and Morgan Shepard, Publishers, 238 Post street, 
San Francisco. 

The Oakland Club has opened a scientifically equipped 
Domestic Science School, and is also editing and publish- 
ing a monthly magazine. Tnis latter is valuable to home- 
makers and house-keepers, and its object is to establish a 
medium for the exchange of 1 bought and a bulletin of in- 
formation of service to women all the way from "Siskiyou 
to San Diego," aud further. Mrs. M. L. Wakeman-Cur- 
tis, the able editor of "The Domestic Science Monthly," 
is to be congratulated upon the success of her undertak- 
ing. The table of contents in the July number is an ex- 
ceedingly attractive one, "Vacation Schools" and the 
"Rights of Childhood" being ably discussed. Seasonable 
dishes are suggested, and many recipes for dainty menus 
are given. This little magazine should find its way into 
every home, not alone as the prospectus of the Oakland 
School of Domestic Science, a power for good in the com- 
munity — but on account of its individual merit. Issued 
monthly at 565 Thirteenth street, Oakland, Cal. Subscrip- 
tion price, fifty cents a year. Single copies, five cents. 

In the Fourth of July number of Collier's Weekly will be 
found a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It is the first 
fruits of his South African experiences. It is called "Folly 
Bridge," and is said to possess power, humor, vitality — 
all the unique traits that have made Kipling the mouth- 
piece of the Anglo-Saxon race. m. e. b. 



July 14, 1900 



BAN FRAVlsro NEWS LETTER 



i 






!■ 



@own CrierXkt 



'Ht*r IM Cricr> '.tfi*t t/te denl art «o« ' 
'0»r t/>*f mtifiiif tht dtiHl. j/r. wtfiyou ' 




OF course the estate of the late William Piper being 
$l.."i77,SS6, was too large to be disposed of according 
to tbe wishes of the testator, and the inevitable natural 
son is at the front, backed by an unnatural mother. 
When a woman, for the sake of getting a fortune, avers 
that although married to another, her relations were in- 
timate with a third party, it may be taken for granted 
that she wants money, and wants it with a mighty yearn- 
ing. Tbe son in tbe case, willing to lose the aspect of 
legitimacy, also makes a bid for popular disregard. There 
is no means of knowing that the allegations made by Mrs. 
W. H. \iken are not all true, but she must excuse the 
public if it appear skeptical, or believing, fail to manifest 
approval. The truth is that a man with a million or 
more cannot expect to die now and not have his grave 
heaped high with scandal. Either there will be a genuine 
demand, or a bogus one, and the real heirs are lucky not 
to come out of the deal in debt to their lawyers. And 
there is another side. The late William Piper was never 
known to take a bath or renew his linen. Any woman 
that would acknowledge having shared a nuptial couch 
with him would acknowledge anything else for the beg- 
garly sum of $1,577,886. 

THE stabbing of James Turner by a girl known as his 
wife, brings to tbe fore again the sort of low life that 
not infrequently causes San Francisco to be regarded as 
a wicked place. Turner is the type of man that ought to 
be stabbed, shot or hanged out of existence; the vermin 
infesting the draggled edge of society. At first the 
assault upon him seemed a wanton attempt at murder, 
but when the facts appeared that this girl had supported 
him by her shame, that her reward had been blows, and 
that he had first used upon her the blade she with better 
effect turned upon him, common sense realized that he had 
been guilty of offenses that ought to be rated as capital. 
It is to be hoped that Turner will not commit the indis- 
cretion of getting well. The world has too many of his 
kind. But should he recover, the girl would doubtless 
continue to support him. The world has too many of her 
kind, too. This is no attempt to make a heroine out of a 
scarlet creature in whom every decent sentiment is dead, 
but a mere record of circumstances. 

IT seems that the Police Commissioners take peculiar 
views of some things. Policeman Ring, who arrested 
on an infamous charge, and wholly without excuse, a 
respectable, elderly woman, was acquitted of unofficer- 
like conduct. If his conduct was officerlike, God save re- 
spectable, elderly women who have occasion to venture 
outside the front gate after sundown. To be sure the 
Commission apologized to the lady, but for what? Either 
she deserved arrest, or Ring deserved to be fired, and the 
apology does not dovetail with the acquittal. Then Ring 
was fined $50 for failure to report off duty. This last 
offense was against the dignity of the Commission, and of 
course not to be condoned. The first offense was against 
a private individual and the public. The private individ- 
ual cuts little ice, and everybody remembers what Van- 
derbilt said about the public. 

IN an endeavor to save a man who had taken poison, 
Dr. Noble is said to have ordered him subjected to a 
hot bath. Other doctors allege that the bath was so hot 
as to deprive the subject of his hide, so that when he died 
his skin had in large measure sloughed off. There is 
something unpleasant in the thought of a skinned corpse, 
and Dr. Noble ought to show his authority for boiling the 
victim of drugs. When a man chooses to die, it may be 
wisdom to snatch him back from the gates of the tomb, 
but if he is bound to pass through, it is his natural right 
to go uncooked. Such ghastly experiments tend to bring 
the science of healing into disrepute. Noble at least owes 
the rest of his profession an apology. 



ft 



EB. VRBSLAND, weighing two hundred pounds, 
, comes into court with a pathetic plaint of having 
been licked by an invalid woman and a girl of twelve 
years. According to the circumstances as revealed, be 
deserved the licking anyhow, and should, instead of whin- 
ing, be gratcfrl it was not administered by a man, in 
which case he would not have been able to appear in per- 
son. Mixed up in the case is Policeman Hvan, who seems 
to need something similar to that which Vreeland got. It 
seems that a poor family owed $1 75 rent, and promised, 
being unprepared to pay it Saturday, to pay double the 
amount Monday. Tbe landlady would not wait, but got 
Ryan to inform the tenants that unless they squared 
accounts a-t once their effects would be thrown into the 
street and themselves into the patrol wagon. Vreeland 
was the owner of the property, and had no business inter- 
fering with the sub- tenant. It is to be recorded with re- 
gret that the landlady also came out of the affair without 
a scratch. 

JACKASSERLY is the lineal descendant of Mr. Bum- 
ble. When Dickens created the immortal beadle, he 
fixed forever this type of officialism. Sometimes official- 
ism is mean and grasping; sometimes it is overbearing 
and impudent. It is in the latter temper that the 
haughty Mr. Casserly shines with the reflected light of 
one side of Bumble. To be sure he apologizes, and ex- 
plains that when speaking as a School Director he in- 
formed his critics that they had best "mind their own 
business," he was joking. He is mistaken, being the vic- 
tim of an imperfect sense of humor. School Director 
Casserly is himself the joke. 

HONEYMOON wasn't in order 

When Maggie and Jimmie were wed. 
He'd scarcely enough for the license, 
Bat that didn't trouble his head. 

Bat Jim wouldn't stand for a pleasure 

Denied to his sweet tootsy-woots, 
So he borrowed four-bits from her father, 

And gave her a ride on the Chutes. 

FOR a paper to declare in advance its belief in the 
guilt of an accused man, is so obviously unfair that 
we withhold all expression of opinion as to Peter McGlade. 
There can be no objection, however, to noting that the 
result of the first trial, the conviction of McGlade, was a 
painful surprise to him and certain of his friends. To 
affirm that the trial was marked by false swearing would 
perhaps be rash, but that it was marked by swearing that 
everybody thought to be false, was obvious. Probably he 
will never again be convicted, and even if be should be, 
there is nothing in the way of tryiDg him some more, until 
at last his innocence shall shine forth as the noonday sun. 

OWNERS of property in Chinatown who have formed 
an association to prevent the enforcement of sanitary 
laws there, constitute as contemptible a band as ever 
plotted against the public welfare. If the property could 
be confiscated they would be rightly served. An associa- 
tion of burglars would have equal moral standing and as 
much right to general esteem. Chinatown as it stands is 
a reeking, stinking menace to health. All that is de- 
manded is that municipal regulations as to cleanliness and 
decency be enforced there, and it is this demand that has 
aroused the resentment of the property owners. 

SNOTHER good Bishop gone wrong. Bishop Potter- 
presumably no connection with Mrs. Brown-Kyrle- 
Bellew-Potter — has been advising his fair boy graduates 
to put their faith in Trustsl Had he made his noun singu- 
lar we could have understood the injunction — but the 
plural? Surely our modern Christian has skipped a long 
way ahead of Christ's behests. Nowadays, instead of be- 
ing told to lay up our treasure in Heaven, we are enjoined, 
forsooth, to put it in Trusts, "which benefit the greater 
number" — of capitalists and Bishops? 

WE have poorhouses for the adult poor and orphan asy- 
lums for the orphans, and yet I find in the streets 
peddling gum young girls whose ages range from eight to 
twelve. There must be parents or guardians back of this 
business who deserve the whipping post or the public 
pump. The faces of these babies are rouged. Shame I 

IT was a dunghill fly that Troutt bit at when he ap- 
pointed Chretien to represent an absent heir. 



IO 



SAN FKANCTSCO NEWS LETTEB. 



July 14, 1900. 




"We miss your whiskers, Walter dear, 
We miss your comic chatter, 

We miss your Weary Willie props 
Down to the smallest tatter. 

We wonder, in our heart of hearts, 
If by your fault you lost her, 

Or if you tired of Norma's charms 
And to the breezes tossed her. 

If to a fairer you have gone 

That favored Eastern woman 

Must wear the graces of a Muse, 
Angelic, superhuman. 

So, though we miss you, Walter dear, 
We can't be melancholy, 

For this inspiring thought is ours : 
We still have Norma Whalley. 



Gardening in Mill Valley is a very pretty pastime, but 
expensive. For instance, Dr. Swain had a handsome 
residence over there and a handsome garden surrounding 
it. He had made conflagrations of banknotes to buy and 
rear the plants, for water, you know, runs almost as ex- 
pensively as wine in Mill Valley. The Doctor's bill was 
never less than twenty dollars a month. Well, he sold his 
house to an Irish lady of eloquent accomplishments, with 
the idea that it would be cheaper to live in the Palace 
Hotel or go to the Paris Exposition. 

The Doctor is something of an amateur electrician, and 
he wired his house so perfectly that you could hardly 
touch a doorknob without turning the lights on; but when 
he moved he took most of the apparatus with him. 

Now, over there in peaceful Mill Valley, is one named 
Louis Janes. He is the Secretary of the Water Company 
and the Secretary of the Electric Light Company, and 
the general Pooh-Bah of the village. 

Mr. Janes' first visit to the lady of the brogue was to 
collect a bill of twenty-one dollars and thirty-nine cents 
for water. His next was to wonder why she burned coal 
oil when electric lights could be put in. The next day a 
fixture agent went over. 

"Madam," said he, "there is a fine electric light plant 
in Mill Valley, and I would like to fix you up." 

"Get out, be gob, and bad cess to ye! Sure Mr. Janes 
was here to put one in yesterday, but I've got enough 
plants already at twenty-one dollars and thirty-nine cents 
a month without having any more in the garden." 

And the little coal oil lamp still burns in the window. 
* * * 

Hermann the Hatter is ill and pulling himself together 
at the Springs, but in his absence there is a large fay 
jovial chap in charge. He has managed to put new life 
into Kearny street. His name I do not know, his smile I 
have never seen, for he always lets somebody else do the 
laughing, but in his smooth German way he is a wonder. 

A crowd of fellows went in the store the other day and 
the gentleman in charge was talking about the decline of 
the practical joke. "Why," he said, "I could put a thou- 
sand dollar bill out there on the sidewalk and you couldn't 
get a Chinaman to pick it up. We used to have only one 
First of April but now we have three hundred and sixty- 
five. If you don't believe me I will prove it." 

And he took down from the case a brand new silk hat of 
the latest mode, placed it carefully in the middle of the 
sidewalk and the crowd watched. 

Sailors, lawyers, chiropodists, manicures, bunco 
steerers, and newspaper men passed the hat and gave it 
a wide berth. They grinned and said, "No bricks for us 
if you please." When all of a sudden who should come 
down the street but a new clerk of Hermann's, unknown 
to the rest of the crowd. He had on a very flimsy straw 
hat that was, I admit, a very bad advertisement for the 
shop. A few doors from the crowd a gust of wind caught 



the hat and it soared and then rolled like a hoop. For an 
instant the new clerk seemed to have an intention to run 
after it, but only for an instant. He watched it roll and 
with a scowl on his face started in the direction of the 
shop; and the crowd watched in silence. 

There was a hat. There was a bare-headed man. He 
looked at it, side-stepped a bit then came back, picked it 
up, put it on his head; and the man in charge who had put 
up the job let the other fellows have the laugh. They also 
did a little buying at the wetgoods establishment across 
the street. They didn't know the new clerk had been 

coached. 

* * * 

They are telling a good story on a well-known attorney 
at the Pacific-Union Club. Will the statement that he is 
inclined to baldness be sufficient to identify him? Well, it 
will have to serve, and those who are wise will guess, 
while those who are not will enjoy the ]oke just for a 
joke's sake. This gentleman of the bar is something of a 
favorite in circles where strong drink and weak women 
are the diversions. He regards himself as a devil of a 
fellow, and even one or two of the gilded ladies of society 
are not, they say, safe when his blandishments are in full 
play. A week ago, while walking down town to his office, 
he made a sudden conquest of a charming young woman. 
I would not describe it by the vulgar word "mash." Any- 
way, they fraternized in five minutes as other people 
couldn't do in as many years. And of course there was 
an appointment for the afternoon that required the Oak- 
land Ferry. Why is it, I wonder, that so many good San 
Franciscans go to Oakland when their consciences die? 
A closed carriage and a flying trip to the Hermitage. A 
bird and a bottle and exchange of names and confidences, 
and he found out that she was wife of a fellow clubman. 
They were lunching in one of the little vine-covered cot- 
tages, and he had walked out for a breath of free air. 
Another carriage was coming in the little driveway, in 
which he recognized an acquaintance. 

"Great Scot!" he said to the lady, "that fellow musn't 
see me; he's a great friend of my wife." 

And in the carriage the fellow was saying: "Holy 
smoke, Maria, there's that fool husband of yours laying 
for us. Driver, get out of this quick!" 

In justice to the other fellow, I may say that perhaps 
he would not have told his side if the lawyer had not come 
up to the club the next day ostentatiously fluttering a 
new scalp in the warm winds of his eloquence. 



Captain O'Brien of the "Dolphin," 

(Mark him, if you please). 
Tells a tale of weird adventures 

In Pacific seas; 

Tells a tale of drunken sailors 

Urged to mutiny, 
Maniacs and dire assassins 

Plotting butchery ; 

Tells of battled fire and shipwreck, 

Hunger's ravages, 
Williwows and polliwows, 

Sharks and savages. 

Still the "Dolphin" rides at anchor, 

Still intact is she; 
And the Captain's fancy story 

Sounds a lot to me 

# * # 

J. D. Maxwell is about as good looking an insurance 
man as ever joined the Bohemian Club; but he will wear a 
toupee. It is a handsome bit of brow upholstery and 
fits him well, but it isn't glued down. And as William 
Shakespeare said when at loss for a better phrase, thereby 
hangs a tale. 

Mr. Maxwell's clerks are respectful, but not reverent, 
and one of them chews gum. I give no credence to the 
rumor that he eats ice cream soda, but he does chew gum; 
and a large wad of the sticky stuff he pasted in the hat of 
Maxwell the other morning. And Maxwell donned the 
hat — a low, rakish straw with a perfervid band of red — 
and started down the street. 

The first ladies he had the fortune to meet were Mrs. 
Maxwell and a charming young widow whose name my in- 
formant refuses to divulge. Up went the Maxwell hand 



July 14, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



to the tropic bat. It stuck, but he pulled like a Ci 
field, and when finally it described a dignified di 
the morning air a large mass of ready-made hair might 
have been heard whistling in the zephyr. 

"I knew it was coming," said Maxwell, "but politeness 
first and embarrassment afterward." 

That's what I call uncovering to women with a venge- 
ance. 

* » • 

Taking life quietly and happily at the Tallac on Lake 
Taboe is C. W. Bonynge, whose last absence from Cali- 
fornia counted six years. He has been to South Africa 
and wbere not since we saw him. He comes loaded with 
good yarns, some of which he is generous enough to tell 
on himself. He met Oom Paul. 

"You are rich, I hear, very rich," said Kruger. 

"Oh yes, we are all rich in America, that's our 
specialty," answered Bonynge, with an Irish twinkle in 
his eye. 

"And you come here to the Transvaal to be hospitable 
guests, eh, invest your moneys so that the Englander will 
bag it and the Boer get a vacation?" 

" Xot on your life, sir; the good American never buys 
a vay from home; he sells." 

"With a little more religion and simpler clothes, you 
would be one of us," said Kruger. 

And Mr. Bonynge's son-in-law is a colonel in the English 
army fighting in South Africa. 

Mr. Bonynge will be in California for several months, in- 
specting his various properties and giving a touch of hearty 

life to the clubs, which they sadly need at this season. 
* * » 

In a hotel not far from Pacific Grove, the proprietor is 
in the habit of cutting his little squares of butter so thin 
that guests often wonder. The table fare is so unusually 
good for the price charged that the wherefor of the thin- 
ness of the butter-cuts is unusually mysterious. At 
luncheon the other day quite a discussion was started, and 
one of those "smart" traveling men undertook to solve 
the puzzle by rhyme. He wrote on a menu: 

Mr. James, Mr. James, to ask a question is no sin, 
And quests who come and guests who go 
Are really anxious just to know 
Why is your butter cut so thin. 
And the landlord's answer came : 

Drummer boy, drummer boy, this great and seeming mystery 
Has puzzled oft no doubt the sinner, 
Now let me tell the reason why 
It is so thin: Well, though I try, 
I cannot cut it any thinner. 

THIS is the time of year when the gentle burglar of the 
metropolis plies his trade with a peculiar and undis- 
turbed persistence. People go off to the country leaving 
their homes in charge of the servants. Now, servants 
are only human, and sometimes when the nights are fine 
they weary of sedentary luxury and wander to the theatre 
or the Chutes or the Park. And the burglar man, with 
his little skeleton key and jimmy does the rest; and some- 
where in some secret place the family plate is melted into 
silver bricks. Not everybody is forethoughtful enough to 
stow his valuables away in the California Safe Deposit 
Vaults, and not every rusticator finds sufficient forks to 
go round the table when he returns to his town house. 

An establishment that is known to the wise the United States 
over is Goldstein & Cohn , importers of human hair and gloves, 822 
Market street. The establishment is unique in the completeness of 
its stock and the courteous attention and the tact of the salespeople. 
In New York, Chicago, and Boston, as well as here, the firm has an 
established reputation, and is in constant correspondence with those 
who desire the best goods at the fairest figures. 



A bestaubaht that has its own distinct atmosphere and is known 
the country over for the excellence of its cooking and the quiet 
efficiency of its service is Swain's Bakery in Sutter street. For 
twenty years and more this restaurant has enjoyed an exclusive 
patronage. It has a character that is decidedly its own. Orders are 
taken for breads, pastries, ices, chicken sandwiches, etc. 

Shorthand, typewriting; individual instruction; attention to 
orthography, etc., $5 per month. Typewriting done on short notice. 
214 McAllister street, Koom 18, Telephone 276. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
ures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 





Capital Subscribed (4 402 760 

LONDON ASSURANCE. c. P u.i p. M up 2.241.37s 

Aaset, 1B.198.I4B 

Capital Subscribed $6 000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. capital paw up soo.ooo 

Assets 2,602.060 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Tuorovghi.y Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief 
of sulfering humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest 
Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electrical apparatus, A 
Corps of well trained nurses of both sexes, skilled in all forms of 
treatments and manipulations, Rest Cure scientifically carried out. 
The Purest and best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * A 

?[uiet, home-like place, beautiful scenery, Mount Hamilton and the 
anions Lick Observatory in plain view ; one block from electric 
cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city. Terms $10 to 
$20 per week, including medical attention and regular treatment. 
Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 

VjeOIge OOOClman patentee and manufacturer ol 

Artificial stone 

(Schlllinger's patent) in all its branches; sidewalk and garden walk a 
specialty. Office: 307 Montgomery street, Nevada block, San Francisco 

Telephone Main 199 

Dealers in PAPEK 

65-57-59-61 First street, S. F. 



Blake. Moffit & Towne 



Blake, Moffit & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Or. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the six months ending Juno 30, 1900, a dividend of 12 per cent, per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, 6 per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliveb Eldridge. President. William Corbin, Secretary. 
Office: 222 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending June 30, 1900, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, July 2. 1900. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending June 
30, 1900, at the rate of three and one-quarter (3%) per cent per annum on all 
Deposits, free of taxes, and payable on and after July 2, 1900. Dividends 
not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after July 1, 1900. 

CYRUS W. OARMANY. Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mexican Gold and Sliver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 64 

Amount per share 15 cents 

Levied July 10, 1900 

Delinquent in office AugUBt 14, 1900 

Day of sale of delinquent stock September 5, 1900 

OHA8. E. ELLIOT, Secretary 
Office— Room 79, Nevada Blo ck. 309 Montgomery St., San Franclsoo, Cal. 

H. ISaaC JoneS, M. D. E ye. Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office— 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a, m. to 4. p. m. 



Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Main 101. 




ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 




Figures given by the Pacific Oil Re- 
Oil Production and porter, which has gathered statistics 
Current Prices. from all the leading oil fields of the 
State now in active operation, show 
that up to July 1st there were 1,451 producing wells, with 
a daily output of 11,466 barrels, and 271 additional wells 
drilling. This production means a total of 4,185,000 bar- 
rels for the year, which will be a large increase over the 
yield of last year, officially reported by the State Mining 
Bureau at 2,677,975 barrels. Of the 271 new wells being 
drilled, 142 are going down in territory north of Tehachapi, 
mainly in San Joaquin. In the matter of price in carload 
lots to terminal points, the same authority quotes Coalinga 
oil at $1.25. This oil for gas making purposes is valued at 
$1.65 and Bakersheld at $1.45. Ventura oil sells at $1.60 
fur gas purposes. In Los Angeles the price is quoted at 
$1, but no new contracts will be written at less than $1.25, 
which can be accepted as a fair average of the ruling 
prices in open market at this date for future delivery. 
Figures are the best criterion of the importance and value 
of any industry, and those quoted above will give a fair 
idea of the rapid development of the oil business in Cali- 
fornia. 

On the 10th inst., which is the regular pay 
The Peerless day of the Peerless Oil Company, every 
Oil Company, bill and indebtedness to date was paid, and 

a contract was made for the sale of all 
the oil the wells can produce at the ruling market price. 
In commenting on the present status of the Peerless wells 
an exchange just to hand mentions the fact that when 
well No. 3 on the company's land had only been punched 
twenty holes, the oil rose 350 feet during the night. Since 
then this well has been completely perforated, and the 
oil now stands in the casing over 500 feet. Mr. John T. 
Wright, President of the Peerless Company, is to be con- 
gratulated upon the satisfactory result of labor in the 
field. He has worked steadily and faithfully from the in- 
cipiency of the enterprise, which he has carried through 
to such a successful finish. In a few months several deep 
wells will be sunk on this property. 

There has been considerable talk for some 

A Big Nevada time past of the possible purchase of the 

Gold Mine. Silver Peak mines by John W. Mackay. 

The transaction has not yet been consum- 
mated, but more unlikely things have happened. Mr. 
Mackay, no doubt, fully appreciates the value of this 
property, which is the largest known gold deposit in the 
West, with possibilities in store which would permit of 
speculation on a reputation for it in the future as a world 
beater in its particular sphere of utility. He has per- 
sonally examined the mines, and had them sampled under 
his supervision, but at that time there were obstacles in 
the way of a purchase which time only could clear away. 
These have nearly all been obliterated, and it can be now 
accepted as a moral certainty that if Mr. Mackay does 
not secure the property somebody else will, as it is un- 
likely its value will be obscured much longer under a 
busljel. The natural difficulty in the exploitation of this 
ground in the past has been a lack of water, but a suffi- 
ciency of this has now been provided. 

Another annual statement of the Hibernia 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Association is again to 
Bank Affairs, hand, showing continued prosperity of this 
old and highly respected financial' institu- 
tion. Its total assets now assume the vast proportions of 
$49,168,908.92, of which $22,506,299.54 is represented by 
mortgages on real estate, $19,947,360.12 in bonds of the 
United States, with $1,778,591.92 in cash on hand. The 
balance of the assets, now verging close upon the $50,- 
000,000 mark, represents an ownership in bonds, and real 
estate of substantial value. The reserve fund is quoted 
at $3,015,760.12, with deposits of $46,153,148.80. This 



financial statement showing a steady growth of business 
year by year, is the best proof of the confidence reposed 
in this sterling institution by the public, which evidently 
recognizes and appreciates a solidity which places this 
bank far above any exigency likely to occur in the busi- 
ness, backed as it is with such immense and mobile finan- 
cial resources. Special credit is due to Judge R. J. Tobin 
for the capable manner in which he handles the millions 
entrusted to his care, and he can well afford to pride him- 
self upon the splendid condition of the Hibernia Bank 
affairs as illustrated in its latest financial exhibit. 

When people are inclined to brag about the 
An Ancient valuable copper mines of to-day they should 
Copper Mine. n °t overlook the fact that there is a prop- 
erty in Germany which can set the gait for 
any modern enterprise in the matter of production and 
continuity. The Mansfield mines in Germany have just 
celebrated in an appropriate manner their 700th anni- 
versary. After many vicissitudes in past centuries, ac- 
cording to the Berlin correspondent of the Economist, the 
mines have been steadily developing during the latter half 
of the present century. In 1854 the mines yielded only 
50,000 tons of copper ore; last year the production 
reached 660,000 tons, from which 21,000 tons of copper 
and 119,100 kilos of fine silver were produced. The mines 
now employ 18,260 operatives, against 3,762 in 1854. 

The Continental Building ard Loan 

A Prosperous Association, located on the southeast 

Building Association, corner of California and Sansome 

streets, has just declared for the 
half year ended June 30th a dividend of 5 per cent per an- 
num on ordinary deposits, 6 per cent on term deposits, 10 
per cent on class "F" stock and 12 per cent on class "A." 
Captain Oliver Eldridge is president and William Corbin 
secretary of this highly prosperous and solid financial 
concern. 

There has been considerable buying of late 
The Local on the local Stock and Bond Exchange for 
Stock Market investment purposes but little for specula- 
tion. There has been an active demand 
for municipal bonds netting the investor from 4 to 4J per 
cent. The municipal securities of the larger towns and 
counties of the State are eagerly bought in the East at a 
3 to 3i basis to investors. The smaller towns, not being 
so well known in that quarter, are usually compelled to 
sell their bonds to buyers in this State. This form of in- 
vestment is considered especially desirable for estates, 
trustees and ultra conservative capitalists. The business 
of the Oceanic and Pacific Steamship Companies now 
reaches the limit of their capacity. The outgoing 
steamers are all crowded with freight. It is expected 
that the new steamer of the Oceanic will be in her loading 
berth some time in September. This vessel will somewhat 
relieve the strain on the company. The stock of the com- 
pany is quoted in the neighborhood of 93 sales. The 
lighting stocks are stronger. This is owing to greater 
confidence among investors that the city government will 
not be able to injure those companies. Spring Valley is 
also firm for the same reason. 

Investors in Comstock shares are still 

The Pine-Street awaiting the boom, which is confidently 

Market. expected to strike the street some of 

these days and set the business whirling 
again with prices on the up grade. If their is anything 
in patience these people certainly deserve there reward 
for the manner in which they have stuck to the game 
under the most trying conditions. With the introduction 
of the electric power and a new and modern system of 
work at the mines there is every reason to hope for better 
times on the street. Since the holidays the only substan- 
tial advance in price has been in Silver Hill, which has 
been gradually working up in value for some months past. 
The balance of the market has been tame, with few fluctu- 
ations from the figures which have been quoted for many 
weeks. A good grade of ore continues to come along from 
Con. Cal. Virginia, the bulk of it being shipped to smelters 
in California instead of being milled as of old on the Com- 
stock. Changes are now being made in machinery along 
the entire length of the lode. 



July 14, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



U 



FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning Julr 7th and 
ending July 12th. 

MI9CEIJ^\NKOU9 BONUS 



Market •«. I.i Ooo> 

Nor KrolQal »%.... 
Oakland TrarialisS 
Oceanic Honda S\_ 

Wim. m 


:...■! « inr. 

l.'MI • 11", 

•..•.. tin 
1. ua 

MM » i"i 1 

area. H>t 

.. 720 71?, 
r. US 95 

345 &i 

ua U 

.. 85 49X 
MS 49 

.. 75 160 

.. H mi 


Park A CHIT Hyf". !".<■■' 
$F«.1J V H)-5'. 
BP nl AHioiuS', 

B P Hrmitli 6 I7.1IOO0 

BTWVWIHK . 1.000 

BTOCKB, 

L'al StroAB Stocks. Sharca. 
67 nana P Co ... T7"i 


4I..I', 
4 111 

'111', 

Mil 

in 

H'al 

ga 

47 

US 

HT'-I 
229 


L>t 

sX 

SS 

>'-' . 


Sprintr V«llry Wik 


■m'« Hawaiian 


100 

. .. '.'10 


Gas ajtd Electric 
Equitable < iaa . 
Mutual Electric 
Oakland Oaa. 


12 Makaweli 


ns 

BE 
95 


24S 

u 1 


SFOea. 

POWDKEA. 

Cal'l Powder 


44 Paaiihnu 8 PI Co. 130 
'V Stbkkt Railroads. 
*'* Market Street 220 

MISCELLANEOUS. 


31 
63 

117', 




••'' i Firemans Fund 


... 10 


229 






The transactions for the week amount to 5,684 shares and 53,500 
bonds, against G.2'3 shares and 41.500 bonds for the week previous, 
from June 22d to June 28th. 

Lighting stocks have been quite heavily traded in at rather better 

& rices than have ruled during the last iwo months. The Equitable 
as Co. recently sold as high as 4' .,. Mutual Eltctnc sold as high 
as 12; Gas and Electric sold up to 4!), falling back to 48 on heavy 
sales. Powder stocks have been quiet, with little trading in Giant. 
California Powder stock sold at 160, the first sale for some time past. 
Sugar stocks were a little off in price. Honokaa and Hutchinson 
were quite freely traded in. The Contra Costa Co. have passed this 
month's dividend and the stock declined to-day to 67. 



UNLISTED SECURITIES. 



Bid. 



Bid. Asked 

American Liquid Air 100 00 Sanitary Reduction. 

Golden Gale Beet Sutrar Nev. Co. Narrow Gauee 

Company 5 00 Railroad 14 50 

Sea Power Co 25 00 Abbey Land Imp. Co 

Union Sugar Co- 22 50 Sutro R R Co 

Oil Stocks. 

1 00 Grand Central 95 

50 Century 

65 BiePanoche 

09% Tar Canyon 

Mining Stocks. 
Argonaut 4 00 Brunswick 



Asked 

1 25 



1 20 

2 50 



Sterline 

Sunset (original)... 

Fresno- Alpha 

Mt. Diablo Oil Co.. 



Central Eureka 1 00 

Dreisam.. 

Dutch 

N. Light (Cape Nome).. 
Santa Rosalia (Meilco).. 



80 
75 
12X 

23 



125 LaFortuna 2 50 

23 Norton Sound 10 15 

50 Victor Gold Mines 50 

12K Columbus Con 30 

40 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks (listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by 

Joseph B. Toplitz. Stock Broker, 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10, 330 Pine street. 



A peculiar condition of the hair in a negro child is 

described by a physician in Trinidad, West Indies. Says 
the Medical Record, May 5th: "The hair grows luxuriantly 
and separates itself into thin rope-like strands, made up 
of closely interwoven meshes. The strands measure from 
six to twelve inches in length. The parts nearest the 
skull are black; the distal ends are a pronounced red, due 
to the exposure to the sun. The condition is congenita'. 
There is much superstition among the natives affected, 
and children are obliged to carry this abnormal mass un- 
til they are old enough to cut it away with their own hands. 
After cutting, the condition does not recur." 



THE Dutch Mining and Milling Company of Tuolumne 
County has levied an assessment of fifteen cents per 
share. The Mazeppa Gold Mining Company has levied an 
assessment of three cents per share. The Mount Diablo 
Oil Company of Contra Costa County has levied an assess- 
ment of one cent per share. 



Health Giving 
Qualities to infants are contained in every can of Gail Borden 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. "It saved the baby's life" is the 
message received from thousands of mothers. Eagle stands First. 

"This beats Paris 1" exclaimed a globe-trotter the other night 
when for the first time he was entertained at the Cafe Zinkand. 
After the play is over everybody goes to Zinkand's to get the best of 
wines, beers and suppers and to listen to the inimitable music. 

Allen's Peesb Clipping Bobeatt, 510 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political, 
from press of State, coast and countryTel. Main 1042. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething. 



" Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing Syrup " for yo r 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 



The Organizers of the 

OPHIR OIL CO., 

Have arranged with the CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST COMPANY to hold sufficient securities in trust for the 
purchasers of Ophir Oil Stock to INSURE HOLDERS OF THIS 
STOCK AGAINST LOSS. 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Company shall fail to produce oil 
in paying quantities sufficient to bring its stock to par value (one 
dollar per share), purchasers will receive back, with accrued interest 
THE ENTIRE AMOUNT PAID IN BY THEM FOR STOCK. 

The securities thus held in trust are adequate, and an investment 
in Ophir Oil Stock is as secure as a United States Government bond, 
and vastly superior to deposits in Banks of Savings, for the reason 
that it combines 

Absolute Security with 
immense possibilities 
of Gain . 

when oil is struck. There is no "reading between the lines" in this 
proposition. Whatever happens to the Ophir Oil Company your 
investment is safe. You cannot lose. Only a limited amount of 
this SECURED STOCK is offered for sale. While it lasts it can be 
had for 

75c. per Share 

Fully paid and non-assessable. Sold only in blocks of $500 and up- 
ward. Common stock, unsecured, can be had at FIFTY CENTS 
per share in certificates of twenty shares and over. 

OPHIR OlTcOiVIPANY. 

Room 14, Fifth Floor, Mills Building,- San Francisco, California. 
Represented in San Francisco by J. P. MASSIE. 



Stocks 



Grain 



C. E. Mackey & Co. 

Investment Brokers 
32 Broadway New York 



Bonds 



Cotton 



Western Mutual Investment Co. *«• *•*•*» 

$2 Per Month 
415-416 Safe Deposit Building;, Montgomery and California streets, San 
Frunelacn. Aeent- Wanted 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



M 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



July 14, 1900. 




THE Journal of Commerce states that the total for the 
first half of the year iu fire losses for the United 
States and Canada is $103,298,900. The same figures for 
the same period in 1898 were $58,237,100; in 1899, $65,- 
699,750. To the underwriter there is something alarming 
in these totals. The weaker companies will be forced to 
the wall, and the stronger companies will probably come 
out at the end of the year with a depleted surplus. It is 
to be noted that this burning ratio is east of the Colorado 
line, and it is estimated that the Pacific Coast loss ratio 
for the first half of the year is considerably below 30 per 
cent. June losses alone for the United States and Canada 
are estimated by the same authority at $21,281,000. There 
is a consensus of opinion among the leading underwriters 
on the Coast that the remedy for this state of affairs is 
only to be found in a limited liability and a co-insurance 
clause being made a part of each fire insurance contract. 

* * * 

Superintendent of Insurance Van Cleave of Illinois, in 
his annual report of life insurance in reference to assess- 
mentism, says: 

" The system of assessment insurance has rapidly declined during 
the past few years. This fact was emphasized during the past year 
by the discontinuance of thirteen companies from business in this 
State, three of which reinsured with other companies and five of 
which changed to the legal reserve system. Many of those which 
are still doing business have found it necessary to readjust and in- 
crease tbeir rates, or levy special extra assessments, and others have 
adopted the full standard legal-reserve rates and have undertaken to 
change old policies to this plan of charging the rates according to 
age at original entry, and taking from the policy holders notes to 
cover the required reserves, which become liens on the policies and 
reduce the benefits in case of death by the amount of such notes." 

This system, which in its inception boldly ignored the laws of 
mortality as deduced from the experience of long-e9tablished com- 
panies, has produced the predicted results, and is being abandoned 
by many who were among its early advocates and supporters. The 
law of this State governing this class of companies is greatly in need 
of revision. 

In this opinion he is supported by Insurance Commis- 
sioner Clunie with regard to California and its laws and by 
the Superintendent of Insurance of New York for New 
York and its laws. Can nothing good come out of this 
Nazareth of desired and needed reformation and can not 
laws be enacted which will if not entirely sufficient to in- 
sure the public from being robbed, at least be strong 
enough to insure that the robbery by assessmentism be 
done with something akin to decency. 

* * # 

A meeting of delegates, appointed by metropolitan and 
local authorities, was recently held in London to consider 
the question of establishing a municipal insurance scheme 
for the city. A Dr. Robinson submitted a statement, 
which showed that the total amount insured against fire 
was over 11,000,000 pounds sterling, and the total annual 
premiums amounted to almost 15,000 pounds sterling, and 
the losses for a period of five years have averaged 2,341 
pounds sterling per annum. The following resolution was 
adopted: "That, having regard to the large and increas- 
ing amounts now paid by central and local authorities in 
London in insuring municipal property . . . this con- 
ference is of opinion that it is desirable that a system of 
mutual insurance should be adopted." All of which shows 
that, while London is a pretty large place, it has escaped 
the notice of the fool-killer. 

* * # 

The amount of insurance involved in the Hoboken fire, 
according to latest information, makes a total of $4,500,- 
000. It is rather a noticeable feature that amongst the 
list of companies involved in the fire losses, the name of 
the Continental Insurance Company cannot be found. Can 
the reason for this be that where the Continental should 
be best known their policies are not as freely accepted as 
they are further away from home? 



C. H. Ward, Special Agent and Adjuster of the Milwau- 
kee Mechanics', is resplendent on the street in a new suit 
of clothes and a burned hand. On the morning of the 
Fourth he was dreaming of the successful settlement of 
his last loss, when flames awakened bim in his bedroom, 
and through his own efforts and at the expense of his 
wardrobe, he rescued from the burning building his 
mother-in-law together with another lady and two 
children. He then coolly groped his way to the telephone, 
apologizing to the Fire Department for being in his 
pajamas, intimated that they would find a little occupa- 
tion at the corner of Pine and Taylor streets if their 
previous engagements would permit. Ward was perfectly 
cool during the episode, except during the time when he 
burned his hands; he was still cooler afterwards as he 
drove to his hotel in his pajamas, where he remained until 
the new suit of clothes was procured. He is lucky to have 
gotten off with as small a loss as he did, both to property 
and person. 

* * * 

The Middle-west underwriters remind one of the coun- 
try farmer who only wanted the land which adjoined his 
farm. The practice of companies reporting their Pacific 
Ccast business to a branch office of the company in Chi- 
cago, leaving the field here without any representation 
other than that of local agents, is bound in the end to cul- 
minate in disaster as well as a decreased income. If there 
is a class of underwriters capable of looking after and 
managing successfully its own business, it is composed of 
the men who make a study of their business and are on 
the ground to watch it. Local agents are only human — 
which does not by any means imply the managers are di- 
vine — and the best of them, unless under proper restric- 
tions, are apt to take advantage of the fact that the 
D. R.'s are submitted to a man who knows nothing what- 
ever of Pacific Coast fire hazards. 

* * ft 

It appears that the famous Committee of Twenty-seven, 
who reported the 1900 agreement, and the Committee of 
Publicity, in fact, the whole outcome of the Philadelphia 
Convention, is going to prove valueless. The object aimed 
at was reduction of expenses, and the object secured 
seems to point to an increase. 

* * * 

The Merchants' and Manufacturers' Fire Insurance 
Company, Baltimore, has been dissolved on an order of the 
Court. The receivers are directed to wind up its affairs. 
ft * « 

"Messiah" Schweinfurth has left his heaven business to 
engage in insurance. This is harder on the profession 
than rebating or cutting rates. 

* * * 

Mr. Clinton J. Hutchins, the energetic general agent of 
the Pacific Mutual Life for the Hawaiian Islands, has ar- 
rived in the city from New York on his way to Honolulu. 
Mr. Hutchins reports the outlook and prospects of the 
Islands brighter than ever before in all lines of busi- 
ness, including insurance. 

H. L. Roff of the Home is back at his desk after a 
thirty days' Southern trip. 

Geo. D. Djrnin, Pacific Coast Manager of the National 
and Springfield, has returned from a trip to Honolulu. 

Thornton Chase, General Superintendent of Agencies of 
the Union Mutual, is in San Francisco visiting the Pacific 
Coast agencies of his company. 

Colonel L. L. Bromwell, of the Milwaukee Mechanics', is 
taking his vacation in the northern part of the State. 

Herbert Folger, of the Phoenix and Westchester, is in 
Washington. The offices of his company will move in the 
near future to other quarters at 214 Sansome street. 

Bernard Faymonville, Vice-President of the Firemans 
Fund Insurance Company, is on his way back from a flying 
trip to Chicago. 

M. R. Higgins, Second Vice-President of the Pacific 
Mutual Insurance Company, is expected at his desk to- 
day, after having been absent on an extended trip to the 
North. 

Leslie Bates, representing Gutte & Frank, has left for 
an extended trip through Montana and Washington. 

Physicians would not recommend Jesse Moore " AA" Whiskey if 
hey did not know it to be the best whiskey in the country. 



July 14, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.KTTI-R 



«5 



OBITUARY. 

THE death of Dr. Cogswell robs San Francisco of a pe- 
culiar and beneficial citizen Hp had his eccentricities, 
but he was a man of large heart, and bis statues arc not 
the only U)kens that stand to mark his memory. In years 
to come he will be reckoned with as the pioneer promoter 
of practical education in the West. 

WILLIAM Elmer Hale, ex sheriff of Alameda County, 
and ex-wardec of San Quentin prison, died at bis 
home In Oakland on Wednesday night. He leaves an 
honorable record and many friends. 

PROMINENT among the deaths of the week is that of 
Frank H. Wood, who passed away on Wednesday last 
in this city at the age of eighty-one. He came to Califor- 
nia in 1850, and for many years was conspicuously identi- 
fied with the financial affairs of the city. 

THE Ogden and Lucin Railroad Company has been or- 
ganized in Utah by C. P. Huntington with a capital 
of $1,000,000. This railroad will be an adjunct to the Central 
Pacific, and will cut off about 100 miles and avoid heavy 
grades. It will cost about $4,000,000. The route will be 
across the upper end of the Great Salt Lake, necessitat- 
ing piling and a steel superstructure for a distance of 
nineteen miles. The water in that part of the lake has an 
average depth of thirty-three feet. Thirty piledrivers 
and scows will be employed in driving hundreds of piles 
this summer and fall. 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams Build- 
ing, N .E. corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 

People taking np their residence in the country for the summer 
can be supplied with suitable crockery and glassware of moderate 
prices, at S. & G. Gu mp & Co., 113 Geary street. 

With the Summer comes the most exquisite flowers of the 
year, and at Leopold's, 33 Post street, yon will always find the most 
exquisite buds and blossoms at the most reasonable prices. 

Pube, old, fine flavor, are the reasons why Jesse Moore "AA" 
Whiskey i» the most popular brand on the market. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

ot ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital. (2.250.000 Assets 810.93-1.2 IS 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 



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The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 

(Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders. $11,000,000 

Kilgabif & Beaver, General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Vooqt. General Agent Accident Department. 

Pacific Mutual Building, S. F. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Savage Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Savage Mining Com- 
pany will be held at the office of the company, room No. 50, Nevada Block, 
309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, THE I9th DAY OF JULY, 1900, 
at the hour of I o'clock p. m„ for the purpose of electing a Board of Trus- 
tees to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, 
July 16, 1900, at 3 o'olock p. m. E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Oftioe— Room 50, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Franclsoo, Ca 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUMD 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 
PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER ENGLAND 

80LID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager, 439 California street, S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Oompany of / North Amer 



nsurance company o 

OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 



ica 



Paid-up Capital 13.000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 15 022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent, 412 California street. S.F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, t3.446.100 Assets. t24,034,110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. J9,612. 455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Saoramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

NeW Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital. $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER A HALDAN, General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital tl.000.000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869.461.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders .- 2,068.839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 
Capital $6,700,000 



BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 



316 California street, S. F. 



Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York- 

Capital, $3,000,000 Gross Assets, 812,808,395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, 87,631,926 
H, L. Rofp, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment of Losses 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
1ST. SOHLESLNGEJR, City Agent 304 Montgomery street San Franoisco 



i6 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 




Travellers to Egypt should beware of the treasures 

they purchase in Cairo. The other day an enterprising 
Australian selected a mummy, and for the trifling sum of 
£10 was permitted to ship to the Antipodes a distant 
relative of one of the Pharaohs in good order and condi- 
tion, considering all things. Oj mentioning his purchase 
a medical friend in Sydney, says the Sydney Mail, sug- 
gested the Roentgen rays being turned on the relative of 
Pharaoh. They disclosed no mummy within the swaddling 
rags. The purchaser thereupon set to work to undo his 
purchase, and inside he had the melancholy pleasure of 
discovering stones, newspapers dated 1898, and any 
quantity of bulrushes. After this we should await some 
new Roentgen ray discoveries at our own British Museum 
with much interest. 

Here is the latest anecdote concerning the Prince 

of Wales. A young lady was presented to him at a social 
function. Not knowing how long she should talk to him, 
she naively requested him to tell ber when she should 
leave him. " On the contrary," said the prince, "it is for 
you to tell me when you are bored." Later his royal high- 
ness asked where the young lady was born. "At Glasgow. 
I have lived there all my life." "How many years did you 
say you lived there?" inquired the prince. "I am bored, 
sir," said the lady quietly. 



THERE is a change in the management of the Maison 
Riche. John P. Heinkel is the new proprietor, "John," 
whose smiling face has greeted the guests of the Riche 
for the last eight years. He has received a good educa- 
tion in the restaurant business and made many friends, 
who will be doubly glad to patronize the place now that he 
is in business for himself. The excellence of the service 
and wines and the sumptuousness of the menu, together with 
the moderate prices conspire to make the Maison Riche 
one of the noted French restaurants of the globe. 

THE Mt. Tamalpais Scenic Railway will make a special 
moonlight trip this Saturday evening, leaving 
here at 5:15, via the Sausalito ferry, giving ample time 
for dinner on the mountain, and returning to San Fran- 
cisco by 11:30 p. m. This is a most delightful trip, and to 
see San Francisco from the top of Tamalpais by moonlight, 
with its myriad of electric lights, is indeed a sight. 

THE first chapter of the Royal Arch Masons celebrated 
their fiftieth anniversary and golden jubilee last Sun- 
day at Golden Gate Hall. Judge Troutt presided as High 
Priest of the chapter, and Samuel M. Shortridge deliv- 
ered an eloquent speech on "the meaning of the day." 

Beware of Ointments for Catarrh that Contain Mercury, 
as mercury will surely destroy the sense o! smell and completely derange 
the whole system when entering it through the mucous surfaces. Such 
articles should never be used except on prescriptions from reputable physi- 
cians, as the damage they will do is tenfold to the good you can possibly de- 
rive from them. Hall's Catarrh Cure, manufactured by F.J. Cheney & Co.. 
Toledo, O,, contains no mercury, and is taken internally, acting directly 
upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the system. In buying Hall's Ca- 
tarrh Cure be sure you get the genuine, ft is taken internally nnd is made 
in Toledo. Ohio, by F. J. Cheney & Co. Testimonials free. 
JCS*Sold by Druggists, price 75c. per bottle. 
Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



The improved machinery and the expert workmen employed by 
the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning Work.9, 353 Tehama street, have 
done away with the horrors of carpet cleaning. Many persons put 
up with dirty carpets just because they dread the process of renova- 
tion and cleaning. At the Spaulding establishment the work is done 
with dispatch and thoroughness, and old soiled and dusty carpets 
are made to look like new. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 
746 Market street, San Francisco. 



"LlODID Velvet" is a term o/t9n applied to Jesse Moore "AA" 
Whiskey. 




Automobiles 



TO THE FRONT 



The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 

The lightest, strongest oheapest and most durable. It climbs the steepen 
grades and Is practicable on all kinds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants 

There ts an active demand lor the oompany's stock. 

There Is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining 

A limited amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per share. Par value $10 
Full Information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 

826 Parrott Building. San Francisco. Cal. S. GUODENOUGH. Secretary. 

San Francisco ^ m ' Larsen - Onager 
Novelty Leather Co. 

Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladies' and Gents' 
Pine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sporting Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical, Suretcal and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 94 

San Francisco 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 

— Dr. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquer Dealers, 

Send for Pamphlet. 418 Sacramento Street. 

Worthington Ames 

Hember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

Weak Men anrl Women should use Damiana Bitters, 

WCC1K. I ICII C1IIU WUIIICII ihe groat Mexican remedy: 
It gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street. San FranolBco. Send (or circular. 



July 4 1900 



SAN FHANCIStX) M\\s I.KTTKK. 



'7 



SunriER Resorts 



> jk -> - 



The >'s*» l.rrrsR liw rMnMUhcd «( Its officr. Ifo, *•' , Kcurny "trrel. 11 
lelUMc li'ic* 1 ! -f Information where knynno Pecking IllfornikMon. route* 
of InkTcI. •Itraetlnn*. price* "I cntcrtAintncnl. an. I nil oilier bttli ihnl *re 
r to * choice of a Summer Iteaort ro»y l»© obtained FREE. 



RUBICON SODA SPRINGS. 

The waters of these .springs possess marvelous 
curative properties, especially effective In theeun- 
of stomach, liver and kidney disorders, and are 
an absolute specific for rheumatic gout, nervous 
dyspepsia, and catarrh. 

Situated in the romantic Rubicon Valley, ten 
miles west of Lake Taboe. 

Stage daily, connecting with steamer at Mc- 
Kinney's. Rates. $2.00 per day, $12 00 per week. 
Table second to none. Altitude. COOO feet. 



Now Open 



D. ABBOTT, Proprietor. 



THE TALLAC 



Lake Tahoe, Cal. 



Open for the season from May 15th. Give 
your family an entire change of climate. No 
more staging ; railroad from Truckee to 
Tahoe. Dr. Pottenger, resident physician. 
For information, inquire of Traveler Bureau, 
20 Montgomery street, or address 



M. LAWRENCE X GO. 



Tails 



Lake county 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural Mineral 
Steam Baths in . . 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. Andersos. Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return 
reduced to ?8. Send for circular. 

M&~Fu)l particulars at S. F, News Letter, §% Kearny St., S. F. 

HOTEL BENVENUE and COTTAGES 

Lakeport, Gal. 

Lakeport's Summer Resort. Situated overlooking the shore on 
Clear Lake. New Pavilion, boathouse, and bowling alley. Open all 
the year. Special facilities for accommodating families with child- 
ren; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing. 
Lovely drives and walks. Rates, $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS, 

SONOMA COUNTY, only 4% hours from San Fran- 
cisco and but 9 miles' staging; waters noted for medicinal virtues; best 
natural bath in the State; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at 
door: photographers' room, telephone, telegraph, daily mail: first-class 
hotel and stage service ; morning and afternoon stages. Round trip from 
San Francisco only 85.50. Take Tiburon ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3:30 p. m. 
Terms, 82 per day or $12 per week. References: Any guest of the past five 
years. Patronage constantly inereasing. 

J. F. MTJLGREW. Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS VILLA 

Kent Station, Ross Ualley, Marin Go. 

A popular summer resort, 45 minutes from the cily ; salt water 
bathing, boating, fishing, etc. Terms reasonable; reduction to fam- 
ilies. For particulars, address 

Mfis. E. Patterson, Proprietress. 
Take Sausalito Ferry. 



LAUREL DELL LAKE 



Lake County 



The most attractive place in Lake County 
to spend your vacation. Boating, bathing, 
bowling, tennis, livery, new walks, etc. 
Write for circular. 



H. WAMBOLD, 



Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



HOBERG'S RESORT 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand five 
hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, lowest price. 
First-class family table and pleasant rooms, seven to 
eight dollars per week; surrounding scenery unsurpassed 
by any springs in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. 
Buy ticket direct for Hoberg's, Lake county, Cal. 
George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 



It is just lovely now at 



No fogs; warm and bright 
Soda water baths. 



NAPA SODA SPRINGS 

Swimming pool. 



HOTEL VENDOME, San Jose. 

One of California's most attractive resoits. The 
starting point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly- 
kept and up-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or address 



GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



HOTEL del CORONADO 



Motto: "Best of everything," Costs no more than plainer resorts. 

BEST: Beach, Table, Water, Climate. 
Boating, Bathing, Fishing. 

GOLF, TENNIS, and all games. Most delightful summer 
climate. Best Mineral Water on the Coast. Address 
E. 8. BABCQCK. M'G'R., Coronndo. Cal. 

THE CELEBRATED SISSON TAVERN 

Now open. Situated at the foot of Mt. Shasta, half a mile from 
the station. Free buss meets trains. Altitude 3500 feet. Fresh 
cream and diiry produce. Climate unsurpassed; average beat, 80 
degrees. Any one wishing to spend an outing in the mountains 
will find this a most desirable place. No poison oak. For further 
information, address Mrs. L. M. Sisson. 

THE THOUSAND ISLAND HOUSE 

Thousand "Islands," Alexan- 
dria Bay. NEW YORK 

The Thousand Island 
House is without doubt the 
most desirable and delight- 
ful sumni'T lesort in the 
country. A thoroug h 1 y 
morlern and up - to - date 
house equipped with a 
large number of public and 
private baths, and lighted 
throughout with electric- 
ity. The region in which 
this hotel stands is one of 
those places nature seems 
to have created for the sole 
pleasure of man. The 
beautiful St. Liiwrcnce River, with its current ever flowing to the sea, ItB 
more than "1000 islandn," some large, some small. Nowhere in the country 
can Ashing and boating be so thoroughly enjoj. ed. For fuller information 
send two 2-eent stamps for illustrated booklet and rates, to O. G. Staples, 
Kiggs House, Washington, D. 0„ or Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 





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8AH FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 




ocieiy 




THE social side of San Francisco life has of late been 
very void of events, though now there are signs of im- 
provement, as already people are returning to town after 
their vacation trips to the country. But July is always a 
trying month to our social world in town while most of its 
members are enjoying themselves elsewhere, and this year 
all the resorts have been extremely well patronized. San 
Rafael has, however, taken the lead as the resort of 
fashion this season, and the guests who are now assembled 
at the Hotel Rafael constitute a large proportion of the 
well known in San Francisco's swim. Dinners are favorite 
forms of entertaining at Sin Ra'atl, either at the diffprent 
homes of the givers, at Fail fax Villa and at the Hotel 
Rafael. Among the prettiest of recent affairs was the 
dinner given by Miss Mary Kip, which was matronized by 
Mrs. M. P. Maus owing to the absence of Mrs. Kip, who 
accompanied her son, the Rev. W. I. Kip, on his trip to 
Rowardennan in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Tennis and 
golf were never more popular than at the present, but 
they are not the only games indulged in by ihe visitors at 
the Hotel Kafael; bowling contests are the latest thing 
for indoor amusement, and the bowling alley is occupied 
the greater part of the time. 

Del Monte's triumphs will come next month. The com- 
mittee who have arranged the sports for the carnival 
week has finished its labors, and the programme is most 
attractive. The mornings of the IHth, 14th and 15th of 
August will be devoted to golf tournaments.; on the after- 
noons of those days as well as on the 16th the polo tourna- 
ment will be held; on the morning of the 18th a game of 
baseball between the B'lingumites and the Alumni of the 
universities will be the attraction, and on the afternoons 
of the 17th and 18th the p>ny races and steeplechases 
take place. But what a lot of other pleasant things will 
be sandwiched in with all these outdoor sports! 

Mrs. Oxnard, Mrs. Henry Bothin, Mrs. Cbauncey Wius- 
low and Mrs. G. C. Boardman at San Rafael; Mrs. W. J. 
Dutton at Sausalito; Mrs. John Curtis at Haywards; Mrs. 
H. B. Chase at Napa; Mrs. Hopkins at Menlo Park; Mrs. 
Beylard and Mrs. Parrott at San Mateo, are among those 
who have had a number of house parties since the season 
opened, and more are on the tapis; George Newhall is car- 
rying all before him at Burlingame as the originator and 
carrier out of the most novel ideas in entertaining yet at- 
tempted in that vicinity. 

Out of town weddings bore off the palm last week, and 
scarcely a shade less pretty than the CampbellRixford 
wedding in Sausalito on Tuesday was the Kittle-Sherman 
nuptials in Ross Valley last Saturday. The little Epis- 
copal Church where the ceremony was performed was 
beautifully dressed with foliage and flowers, roses, jessa- 
mine and magnolia blossoms taking leading place in the 
decorations, and quite filled with friends of the contract- 
ing parties when the bridal party arrived at two o'clock. 
The bride, Miss Lucia Kittle, who was given away by her 
mother, Mrs. John Kittle, and attended by her sister 
Ethel as maid-of honor, was robed in white satin elabor- 
ately trimmed with rare old point lace, and carried a 
bouquet of bride's roses. The groom, Dr. H. N. Sherman, 
had Dr. Willets as his best man, and Bishop Nichols was 
the officiating clergyman. After the ceremony a bridal 
iltjruw r was served at the Kittle vilia at San Anselmo, 
and later in the day the happy couple departed on their 
honeymoon trip. Among the invited guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Willie Babcock, Mr. ai.d Mrs. E. J. McCutcheon, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Kittle, Mr. and Mrs. Gto. Boyd, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Griffith, Mrs. H. P. Allen, Mrs. a: d Miss CofiV, 
Mr. and Mrs. Barber and Miss Barber, Mr. and Mrs. 
Latham, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Allister, the Misses Moore. Alyse Latham, E'hel Warren, 
and F. Butler, Dr. and Mrs. Howitt, Ward McAllister, 
Ben and Bert Dibble, Chas. Kent, the Rev. J. Reide and 
others. 



The telegraph has given us news of the wedding in New 
York last Tuesday of Miss Grace Burr and Chas. T. 
Wilder, whose marriage was solemnized at the Church cf 
the Holy Apostles at high noon, the Rev. W. W. Williams 
officiating. Both bride and groom are well known in San 
Francisco, where they purpose making their future heme, 
first taking a trip to Honolulu after the honeymoon has 
been passed the other side of the continent. 

Miss Caro Crockett has been occupied all week receiv- 
ing the congratulations of her friends for her brilliant play 
of golf at Burlingame last week, whereby she carried off 
the Poniatowski challenge cup, which was last year won 
by Miss Alice Moffatt. Surgeon General Sternberg, 
U. S. A., will be among the strangers within our gates 
next week, coming on a tour of inspection. Our button 
loving maidens will be pleased to hear that the Iowa will 
soon again be in our harbor, and that a German man-of- 
war is almost due, which will make a stay of some dura- 
tion. Germans are all fond of tripping the light fantastic, 
and are in the main good dancers, so no end of frolics may 
be looked for while they are in port. 

Colonel and Mrs. M. P. Maus were among the week's 
arrivals at San Rafael; Colonel and Mrs. O. F. Long are 
enjoying a visit to Santa Monica; Colonel and Mrs. James 
H. Marshall are spending a few days at Castle Crag; Mr. 
and Mrs. C. R. Walter and Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Neustadter 
have gone on a fishing excursion to Lake Tahoe. Mrs. 
Noakes and her daughter Miss Jean, who spent last win- 
ter in Belgium, have been making a tour through Switzer- 
land with Miss Anna Voorhies as their traveling compan- 
ion; Walter Martin has gone on a passear to gay Paree, 
where he will spend a month or six weeks; Mayor J. D. 
Phelan and his sister, Miss Mollie, who are at present in 
Europe, will see all that can be accomplished, including 
the Paris Exposition, before their return, which will be 
abiut the end of August. Mrs. John F. Swift, who has 
quite recovered from her long and serious illness, arrived 
home from Los Angeles early in the week. 

Mrs. Orville C. Pratt and son, Mr. O. C. Pratt, from 
San Francisco, arrived at Coronado Monday for another 
season. Mrs. H. C. Breeden is to remain at Coronado 
some time, Mr. Breeden having returned to San Francisco 
early in the week for a brief visit. 

Lieutenant Blakely, Dr. Odell, and Mr. Richard White 
of the U. S. S. Ranger, gave a luncheon on shipboard on 
the Fourth. A number of San Francisco society folk were 
the guests. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Payne, of New York City, will re- 
turn to San Francisco abaut August 1st, after an absence 
of two years. They will make their permanent residence 
in San Francisco. 

Among the arrivals during the past week at the Hotel 
Rafael were: Mrs. M. O'Brien, Miss M. Casev, J. M. 
O'Brien, B Wood, Fred Greenwood, Emile White, Miss 
T. C. Morgan, Marion P. Maus, Mrs. Maus, G. L. Rath- 
bone, H. B. Haughton, H. H. Hewlette, Ray M. Pike, H. 
S. Crocker and J. F. Babcock. 



After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Japan- 
ese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



For home use, for bar use, for everybody's use, Jesse Moore "A A" 
Whiskey is always the best. 

A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'5 ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton(a patient): "As you ladies 
■will use them. I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations," For sale 
by all druGTG-istH and Fancy-foods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
S7 Great Jones street, N. Y. 




July 14. igoo 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



«9 



Statement of the Condition and Value 

OF THE ASSETS AND LIABILITIES 
OF THE 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 

A CORPORATION, 
And where said assets are situated, dated June 30, 1900. 



Assets. 



1 — Promissory Note9 and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual value of which is $22,506,299 .54 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
is as follows : They are all existing contracts, owned 
by said Corporation, and are payable to it at its 
Office, which is situated at the corner of Market, Mc- 
Allister and Jones streets, in the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California, and the payment 
thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Eeal Estate 
within this State. Said Promissory Notes are kept 
and held by said Corporation at its said Office, which 
is its principal place of business, and said Notes and 
debts are there situated 

2— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual value of which is 45,300 .00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
is as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned 
by said Corporation, and are payable to it at its 
Office, which is situated as aforesaid, aDd the pay- 
ment thereof is secured by "Spring Valley Water 
Works Second Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds," "Park 
and Cliff House Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
and "Market-street Railway Company First Consoli- 
dated Mortgage 5 per cent Gold Bonds," and the 
market value of all said bonds being $64,530.00. Said 
Notes are kept and held by said Corporation at its 
said Office,, and said Notes and Bonds are there 
situated. 

3 — Bonds of the United States, the actual value of 

which is $19,947,360. 12 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said corporation, and are kept and held by 
it in its own vaults, and are there situated. 

They are "Registered 4 per cent ($18 000 000.00) and 
3 percent ($500,000.00) United States Bonds" and are 
payable only to the order of said corporation. 

4— Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which is . . 3,173,498 .35 
The condition of said bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said corporation, and are kept and held by 
it in its own vaults and are there situated. They are 
"Market Street Cable Railway Company 6 per cent 
Bonds ($951 000.00)," "Market Street Railway Com- 
pany First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 
($282 000.00), ""Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds ($150,000 00)," "Powell Street Railway 
Company 6 per cent Bonds ($50 000.00)." "Northern 
Railway Company of California 6 per cent Bonds 
($428 000.00)," "San Francisco and North Pacific 
Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds ($237,000.00)," 
"Spring Valley Water Works Second Mortgage 4 
per cent Bonds ($359,000.00)," "Spring Valley Water 



Works Third Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($406,000.- 
00)," and "City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent Bonds 
($24 750.33)." 

5— Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to July 1, 
1900 244,641 .06 

6— (a) Real Estate situated in the City and County of 
San Francisco ($562 628.74), and in the Counties of 
Santa Clara ($187 076 97), Alameda ($125,460.82), and 
Sao Mateo ($29,366.26), in said State, the actual value 

of which is 904,532 .79 

(b) The land and building in which said corporation 

keeps its said Office, the actual value of which is .... . 668,685 .14 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it belongs 
to said Corporation, and part of it is productive. 

7— Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin, belong- 
ing to said Corporation, and in its possession, and 
situated at its said Office, Actual Value 1,778,591 .92 

Total Assets '.* $49,168,908 .92 



Liabilities. 



1— Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and 

the actual value of which is $46,153,148 .80 

The condition of said Deposits is that they are pay- 
able only out of said Assets and are fully secured 
thereby. 

2— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3.015,760 .12 

Total LiabUities $49,168,908 .92 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

State of California, 
City and County of San Francisco, ss. 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBERT J. TOBIN, being each separ- 
ately duly sworn, each for himself, says: That said JAMES R. 
KELLY is President, and thatsaid ROBERT J. TOBIN is Secretary 
of THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Cor- 
poration above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY, President. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this second day of July, 1900. 
GEO. T. KNOX, Notary Public. 
In the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 



BANKING 



THE VETERAN.— frank l stanton- in Saturday evening post (pha.). 

Nuthin' but fightin' an' fightinM I'm gitlin' too old fer it now, 
But when I hear bullets a-wbizzin' I wtnt to jine in am/how I 
Jest readiD* tbe news in the papers o' how they air bluziu' away 
Makes rue cut up the queerest o' capers, an' booray tbe old-time 
hooray ! 

Nuthin* but figbtiu' an 1 fightin'— guns from the East to the West, 
An' me on a furlough that's left me forever an' ever at rest ! 
Step sorter baltiii* an' feeble — eyes th-it air lackin' the light, 
An' rav heart keepin' time to the drum-beat when I see tbe boys hep 
to the right I 

Nothin' but fightin' an' fightin', an' nuthin' that 's left me to do; 

An' yit I'm as willin* as ever— an' yit I wuz raised to it, too! 

I tell you, my eyes they git misty when I'm hearin' tbe news o' the 

fray. 
To think I kin only jest hear it, an' stay home an' holler "Hooray I" 

Didn't I face it with "Stonewall"? Didn't I foller "Bob" Lee? 

Didn't be say fer a-many a day there warn'tany fighter like me? 

An' nou\ whilst they're rippin' an* rearin', an' doin' their deadli- 
est do, 

1 can't take a ban' in the scrimmage with the boys in the jackets 
o' blue I 

"Laid up!" Them's tbe words I'm a-sayin' all o' the days an' tbe 

years ; 
Laid up! whilst the ban's air a-playin'— laid up on the shelf fer 

repairs! 
An' 1 bear how they're fightin' tbe battles — I see the boys marcbin* 

away, 
An' all I kin do fer my country is to stay bf mean' holler "Hooray !" 

LULLABY.— EUGENE FIELD, IN CHICAGO NEWS. 

Fair is the castle up on the bill — 

Hushaby, sweet my own I 
The night is fair and the waves are still, 
And tbe wind is singing to you and me 
In this lowly home beside the sea— 

Hushaby, sweet my own I 
On yonder hill is store of wealth— 

Hushaby, sweet, my own 1 
And revelers drink to a little one's health; 
But you and 1 bide night and day 
For the other love that has sailed away— 

Hushaby, sweet my own! 
See cot dear eyes, tbe forms that creep 

Ghostlike, O my own! 
Out of the mists of the murmuring deep; 
Oh, see them not and make no cry 
Till the anuels of death have passed us by— 

Hushaby, sweet ray own I 
Ab, little Ihey reck of you and me— 

Hushaby, sweet my own! 
In our lonely home beside the sea; 
They feek the castle up on the bill. 
And there they will do their ghostly will— 

Hushaby, O my own! 
Here by the sea a mother croons 

'• Hushaby, sweet my own ! 
In yonder castle a mother swoons 
While the angels go down to the misty deep, 
Bearing a little one fast asleep — 

Hushaby, sweet my own I 

WORSHIP —EDITH C BANFIELO IN THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY. 

I wandered down the dim-lit forest aisles, 
With brooding eyes and reverent slow feet: 
I saw tbe quiet arches overmeet. 
More fair than med : oeval-builded piles. 
1 traced tbe shadowy cathedral lines, 
And heard the tiny choristers repeat 
Their Benedicite, upsinging sweet 
Above the surging octaves of the pines. 
Most holy high Cathedral of the Wood, 
Whose doors are ever open night and day, 
That they w ho will may enter, it is good 
In thy great nave to linger and to pray ; 
Thence from the silence and the solitude 
To go ennobled on the daily way. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 82.000.000 Surplus. $1,000,000 

Profit and Loss Account. January 1, 1900, 82,321.212 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President! CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I I. F. MOULTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs. 
N. M. Rothschild & Sous. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto Geseltschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits July 1. 1900, 826.952.875 Reserve Fund 8218.593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000.000 Contingent Fund 439.608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors — Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magec, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barlh, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco. Post Office, or Wells Fargo At Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X, Go. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Sotteb Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KINO, Manager F. L. LLPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 86,250,000 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons, Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 

Dooly. Cashier: Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine, Andrew ChriBteson. Oliver Eldrldge. 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. Ring, George E. Gray, John J. McCook. 

John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital 8300.000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier. 

DLRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moftitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert MeEIroy, Chas. S. Neat, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo &. Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and SurphiB 82.238.372.45 

Capital actually paid up In Cash LOOT TOO 00 

Deposits June 30. 1900 58,938.395.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary. A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N. 
Walter, 

Continental Building Z* Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital.. 810.000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8210,000 
Paid-in -Capital 1.500.000 Monthly Income, over 100.000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent. Interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 6 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Corbin. Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Stb. 

Paid-up- Capital 81,000.000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W. E. Brown, Viee -President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E. B. Pond. W. E Brown, C, E. Green. G. W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker, G. W. Scott. 



July 14. "90°. 



SAN FR.\N\ : O NEWS l.KTTKR. 



21 




unbeams 



= 



BANKING 



•TOLKK PROM THIEVE*. 

— "What a pretty new sbirt waist!" he exclaimed, as 
be tried to press a wrinkle out of it with his arm. 'I'm 
(flad you ike it," she said shyly. "Wait a minute," he 
said, SDiffiojf the air; "I smell something burning." "D,m't 
be alarmed, Fred," she said, drawing the arm tighter 
about ber which be had almost removed; "it's this new 
waist. I got it at Culver's fire sale to-day." 

— TnE kitchen door opened with a "swishl ! I" "Now, 
you," began the sharp- visaged lady of the house. "I 
ain't got no ole clo'es; I ain't got nothin' fur you. Now 
git!"' "Lady," said the wayfarer, when he had recovered 
bis breath, "I'm do beggar. I'm a peripatetic pedagogue, 
and I'd be glad to give you lessons in grammar in exchange 
for board and lodging." 

— A distinguished diplomatist from the United States 
of America, a very geoial and social being, soon after his 
arrival in London made the rouDd of the sights — Mme. 
Tussaud's among the number. "And what do you think 
of our wax-work exhibition?" asked a friend. "Well," 
replied the general, "it struck me as being very like an 
ordinary English evening party." 

— First Scorcher— Gee! lcnk at your tires! Been 
running down an express train? Second Scorcher — Nan I 
Just run over a kid on the boulevard. First Scorcher — 
I thought you ran over kids every day? Second Scorcher 
— Yes, but this kid had been sent for a box of carpet 
tacks. 

—Cannibal Chief — What! 
you that I prefer a loast! 
majesty 1 Since tourists ride 

it is hard to catch them, and when we do catch one he's 
all skin and bonesl 

— "Are you fond of animals?" asked the tall young lady 
with the soulful eyes. "Am I? You just bet," replied 
the little fat man. "They knock the tar out of pastry 
and vegetables." 

— Mr. Tallback — Well, waiter, how much shall I have 
to tip you? Waiter— Oh, I leave that to you, sir. Mr. 
Tallback — Thanks, awfully; it'll help to pay my cab fare. 

— "Isnt Barbara droll?" "What now?" "She has 
cards out for a silver celebration." "She's not married." 
"No, but she's been a bachelor girl for 25 years." 

— Jimmie (jubilant)— I got one eye, one hand, one giant 
cracker, an' one match left! An' de Fourth ain't over yet, 
you bet! 

— "Did the cat come back?" "We are afraid it did. 
We gave it to the butcher boy." 

— Mrs. Newly Rich— -All my silver is branded "sterl- 
ing." Haven't you some other make? 

— When a man has a day to himself he can't recall any 
of the things he longed to do when he was busy. 



A stew again? I've told 

Cook— Impossible, your 

through Africa on bicycles 



If you have suits, gowns, gloves, laces, tapestries, ribbons, or any- 
thing else that requires renovation, send them to the Spaulding 
Cleaning and Dyeing establishment, 127 Stockton street. Here things 
are cleaned in the most approved fashion. The best of workmen and 
apparatus are employed, and the prices are reasonable. Spaulding 
will make your husband's old suit of clothes look like new. 

A baw, coarse whiskey that burns and bites is the kind that kills. 
Whiskey should be soft and mellow with a bouquet like good wine. 
Such a whiskey is a legitimate tonic, nature's antidote for the wear 
and tear of life. The Argonaut brand is of that kind. Not drunkardB 
but drinkers drink it. The sole agents for the United States are 
E. Martin & Co., 54 First street. 

THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) offers 
Eastern passengers three elegantly appointed vestibuled express 
trains daily between Chicago and New York and Chicago and Boston. 
For sleeping car reservations and full information address Jay W. 
Adams, P'ac. Coast Pass. Agt., 37 Crocker Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

AMkarlnd ftiulli.1. »!.•... ,.i.i CfeplUl Hub"crlh«d and Fully Paid, l2.4M.0OO 

HEAD iifkii'K ;i Umibanl mat, London, 

PORTLAND BRANCH -Cbunl«r at OtMnBMrai BoDdln* 

IUOMV BRANCH -LMP«Mo4n 

Bunkers— Bunk of KriKlMicl. London Joint Slink Bonk, I United. 

Agrentfl nnd Correspondent*: Nk« Viikk J. I". Murom A: Co.; CtitcAno— 
t'nlnn Nitllonnl Hunk. 

Tills bnnk Is prepared to irntnt letters of erodlt nvsllnhlc In ftnr pnrt of the 
world And to transact every description of luiliklne mid cxeliaiiKO bufltnem 

William Mackintosh. Mnnseer. 



Bank of British Columbia 

S. K. cor. Bush Hiid Sansome His. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862 

HEAD OFFICE: GO Lombard St.. Lokdok. 

Capital Paid Up. 13.000.000. Reserve Fund. {500,000 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloopd. Nanl- 
aino. Nelson Rossland, Sandon, British Columbia: Portland. Oregon. 

This hank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon its 
head ofllce and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New Yobk — Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank: 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank: Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany: Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico: South 
America— Londoi. Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land^ — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other hanking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansome and Sutteb Stb. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Paid-Up Capital, 82,000.000 

Reserve Fund. S925.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 
AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank, 
Limited. No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.: Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direct on the principal citieB of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM C. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sta., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfs, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson. D. J. Staples. Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
V Pope, H. E. Huntington, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to aet as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savings. Inyestments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors — Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro. F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg. vice-President; H. 
Brunner. Cashier - 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London. E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up Sl.SOO.OU* 

Subscribed 3,000.000 Reserve Fund... 700,00' 

Agents at New York~J. & W. Seligman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphio transfers, and Ibbucs letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and Bells exchange and bullion 
IGN. STEINHART. P. N. LHJENTHAL. Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 



William Alvord 
William Rabcock 
Adam Grant 



S. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. 8. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 

E. J. Mc Cut oh en 
R. H. Pease 



82 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

15he LOVE THAT TURNED. 



July 14, 1900. 



ALONE in a sumptuously furnished 
flat in Queen Anne Mansions sat 
Mrs. Granger Burdette. A note, 
which she twisted nervously between 
her slender fingers, engaged her 
thoughts. It was from her husband, 
and read: 

" My Deae— Awfully sorry about to-night. 
Guernsey 's on the verge of D. T.'s; don't 
dare leave him. Get Kennedy to show you 
the sights.— G." 

The careless apology of an indiffer- 
ent husband. She should have become 
used to such in her two years' ex- 
perience ; they had been frequent, 
enough, she thought bitterly. 

He had been devoted to the Guern- 
seys during their two weeks' acquain- 
tance — the dissipated husband and 
the wife with the rouge and appetite 
for brandy. 

That Guernsey was on the verge of 
delirium tremens did not seem im- 
probable after his convivialities, but 
that Granger should inconvenience 
himself on that account was incon- 
ceivable, and remembering past eva- 
sions she did not accept the explana- 
tion as a matter of fact. 

The temptation of a jolly evening 
with the Guernsey crowd had un- 
doubtedly outweighed the obligation 
of a promise to show her the wild ec- 
centricities of the Frivolity masked 
ball. 

Mrs. Burdette counted her disap- 
pointment as nothing ; there were 
subtler and less tangible influences at 
the root of her annoyance. 

That allusion to Kennedy. Not 
every husband would so carelessly 
turn his wife over to a man who so 
evidently admired her, one whom he 
had scarcely known a week. 

She had known Bruce Kennedy well 
before her marriage, and their meet- 
ing now had been accidental. She 
had tried to avoid him, but — what 
use? Granger neither saw nor cared. 
He had never cared ; it had been her 
money, and she — well, she had mar- 
ried him because she believed he 
adored her, and there were things 
she was trying to forget. 

And yet beyond his careless indif- 
ference to her and her pleasures she 
felt she had little ground for com- 
plaint. 

"Mrs. Burdette! Alone? Where 
is Burdette?" 

Bruce Kennedy, debonair, and well 
worth looking at, stepped without 
ceremony into the drawing room. He 
had become so constant a visitor that 
his arrival had ceased to be an- 
nounced. 

"Granger? Oh, he and Guernsey 
are making a night of it somewhere," 
she answered lightly. 

"That's hard luck," returned Ken- 
nedy; "I was going to propose that 
you and Burdette and — some of the 
others" — vaguely — "personally con- 
ducted by myself — take in the Ball. I 
made so cocksure of it I engaged tbe 
dominoes sent up." 

Mrs. Burdette laughed. " I am 
sorry for your disappointment," she 
said. " 'The others' have apparently 



departed, and we are thrown on our 
own resources." 

Kennedy looked at her keenly. 
"Come with me," he exclaimed auda- 
ciously, "I'll take you. It is per- 
fectly proper, and I don't think Gran- 
ger would object." 

"I am not in a mood to weigh pro- 
prieties, I fear," returned Mrs. Bur- 
dette, recklessly, and ignoring bis 
last remark. "If you will take me I 
will go." 

"Edith," fixing his burning glance 
on her, "to the end of the earth if 
you " 

"Hush," she cried, tremulously, "if 
you begin like this where shall we 
end?" But she flung back a light 
laugh at him as he followed her. 
# * * * 

Kennedy, protecting his companion 
from the elbowing of the crowd, made 
their way to the boxes arranged 
either side of the building to give full 
view of the dancers and at the same 
time to effectually conceal their occu- 
pants. 

He uged Edith to throw aside her 
domino, and she, holding back the 
short plush curtain with her ungloved 
hand, gazed with absorption at the 
saturnalia outside. 

Kennedy drew up a chair beside 
her. 

"To-night," he said, "everything 
to them — as to me — is couleur de rose. 
They are under the influence of a mad 
miod incidental to frequent libations 
and the abandon of the occasion — as 
I — under the intoxication of your 
presence — the delight of having you 
once more to myself — alone — like this 
—Edith " 

"Stop, you shall not," she cried, 
half rising as Kennedy attempted to 
take possession of her bands. "You 
are taking cruel advantage of the 
situation." 

"Edith, listen — you shall listen to 
me. You know I will take no advan- 
tage of you. You stopped these 
words on my lips once before. Da you 
remember that night at Cromer — bow 
I tried to tell you how I loved you? 
Why would you not listen to me then? 
You laughed and turned me aside. I 
left you, but I swore the day should 
come when I would make you listen — 
aye, and love me, too — and when I re- 
turned you were married. How you 
trifled with me," bitterly. 



\M 



(The 

— ^r^~~- 



F 7 



>c perfection 

BnTTLfTOA-f ThE DliflLLERY 

PURE- AGgP,- A»MDLE5D ME . 

Used 111 Z/ieMedtcd/ Departments of/he 

U.S. ARMY $ NAVY Service 

William Wolff s, co. 

san francisco, distributors. 

Before oflm/ldttons or rejt//ed Bottles 



"1 did not; oh, indeed, you wrong 
me. I did not understand — I had been 
told you were engaged — that — you 
were only amusing yourself with me — 
I never knew." She was standing 
now as if to defend herself; anxious 
to escape, the curtain hiding her from 
view. 

Kennedy's face was white and 
drawn. "Edith," he cried, pleadingly, 
"my Heaven — and you cared for me 

then — and now " he stretched out 

his hands to her. 

"You forget youself," she answered 
coldly. "I " 

A rap at the door. The waiter for 
an order. Kennedy discreetly stepped 
outside, carefully closing the door be- 
hind him, and Mrs. Burdette sank 
wearily into her chair. 

Her eyes, half blinded with tears, 
fell upon two masques approaching 
within near range of her; instinctively 
she drew the curtaio closer. The girl 
wore a coquettish costume, which 
showed to advantage her well-rouDded 
legs, and the low-cut chemisette gave 
a tempting glimpse of white neck and 
shoulders. The man wore a fancy 
suit of blue satin. As they stopped 
below her box their voices were dis- 
tinctly audible. The girl was saying 
petulently, "Heavens, no one knows 
us, anyhow; let's takeoff these stifling 
masks." 

Edith started; she scarcely needed 
the piquant features revealed by the 
removal of the mask to recognize Mrs-. 
Guernsey. That the man was her 
husband she knew instantly. 

"And how do you suppose her lady- 
ship is amusing herself this evening?" 
asked Mrs. Guernsey, saucily look- 
ing up at her partner. 

Burdette, flushed with drink, 




ETCH1NO BY ERNEST C. ROST. Size 28xH. 

Copy of one of the premiums given for the return of twenty-five 

QUEEN LILY SOAP wrappers. 



July 14, 1900. 

lauphed carelessly, and replied, 
"Moping about the flat, as usual, I'll 
wager." 

"Not if she's as clever as I take 
her to be," returned the woman slyly. 
"She is probably skylarking some- 
where with Kennedy — any one with 
half an eye can see that he is head 
over ears in love with ber." 

"Well, he's welcome to herl" re- 
plied Burdette. 

"What explanation will you give her 
ladyship to-morrow?" significantly. 

"One far less improbable than that 
with which you'll dupe Guernsey," 
returned Burdette coarsely. "Oh, I 
say, let's get out of this. We can't 
get a drink standing about here, and 
it's hotter than Hades." 

Edith cowered back in her chair; 
she was stifling, smothering. Which 
way should she turn? 

"Edith, what is it?" exclaimed Ken- 
nedy, returning, shocked at the sight 
of her haggard face, bewildered with 
the strange light in her blazing eyes. 
"Edith, say you forgive me. I have 
been a brute. How can I atone — 

shall I take you home? Darling " 

as she turned to him with outstretched 
hands. 

"I — have no home," she said, brok- 
enly; "I have only — you. I have 
loved you always, Bruce — madly — de- 
votedly " 

A dancer in pink tights is pirouet- 
ting wantonly over the floor, but the 
plush curtain over the aperture is 
drawn. The discreet waiter raps 
twice. 

"The brandies for two: yes, sir — 
and the champagne has been or- 
dered."— Photo Bits. 

K3/.2/.3/.3/.2/.3/.3/.3/.3/.3/.2/.2(.«3/:3/:S/:9:3/:a:3£S(3fK3f3/: 

.50 I 

s 

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8 a r£^StylbhHC- 

Dressy Suits #20 
Pants £4.50 




My $25.00 Suits are the» 

best in America. » 

>\ r Per Cent Saved by get-g 

Z ling your suit made by|j 

JOE POHEIM fe 

THE TAILOR S 

$ Samples Sent 1110-1112 Market St. S 
5 >m ■- 201-203 Montg'y St.,S.F.g 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Co. 

Shipping; and Commission Merchants 
General acents 

Oceanic Steamship Company 

Gilllneham Cement. 

327 flarket street, cor. Fremont, S. F. 




BAR] - i rrr.it. 

A NEW MASCAGNI 
OPERA. 

UNDISMAYED by defeat, regard- 
less of criticism, Pietro Mascagni 
has just published a new work, a 
lyric drama emit ed " Vistilia," says 
the Musical Courier, and published it, 
not with Sunzogno, not with Ricordi, 
mirabile diet*, but a Leghorn firm, 
Belforte A Co. 

The libretto is taken from a well- 
known novel by the Italian writer, 
Racco de Zerbi, and has been written 
under the joint collaboration of Guido 
Menasci and 1 uovanni Targioni-Tez- 
zetti, the original librettists of the 
famous "Cavalleria Rusticana," which 
as is well known, was also adopted 
from a novel by Verga. 

Tbe libretto of "Vistilia" is divided 
between a prologue and four acts, 
and the action goes back to the times 
of the Emperor Tiberius. The story 
treats of the passionate love of 
Vistilia and Helius, and is full of 
passages of great psychological and 
dramatic interest leading up to a 
deeply dramatic climax in the death 
of the heroine. A noticeable technical 
novelty in the treatment of the 
libretto is the introduction in classic 
meters — those of Cabuttus, Tibullus 
and Horace. All the dialogues are 
written in hexameter verse. As to 
the music, a present criticism would 
be both hasty aDd premature. 

The work will probably be staged 
for tbe S rst time in the early autumn, 
unless the composer's impresarii may 
wish to avert a too close proximity to 
the opening performances of the 
much-advertised "Maschere," which 
work Mascagni is now finishing, and 
upon which the hopes of so many of 
his admirers are now laid. 

The Italian newspapers are hinting 
that "Vistilia" may be the long- 
looked-for Mascagni masterpiece, but 
we suspect the mysterious manner in 
which it has been published. It seems 
like a very clever advertising dodge, 
nothing more. 



HABIT is everything. 
The evils of drinking was the 
suDJect upon which two prominent 
clubmen communed the other day. 
"Why not ask one's friends to take 
something more useful- than a drink?" 
Acting upon the idea they went into 
the nearest shop — a haberdasher's — 
and Number One asked: 

"What will you have?" 

"A pair of socks, I think," said 
Number Two, and with a " Here's 
luck I" he put them in his pocket. 

"Have one with me?" 

"Thanks; I'll have a tie." They 
chatted while the tie was being 
papered, and then came the inevit- 
able: 

"Have another?" 

"No, thanks, really," was the ans- 
wer; "have to keep my head clear 
for ousiness, don't you knowl" 

— Gadsby — How did you come to 
know your wife? Mr. Sour by— I 
married herl 



»3 

TOLD BETWEEN 
THE WHIFFS. 

BUT a few paces separated them, 
there is a slight bow, a half stop. 
progress of a few yards, then a mu- 
tual halt. Both are Hushed, both con- 
fused. Small matter for wonder this. 
The last time they met — and parted — 
it was as lovers. Though three years 
have passed since then, neither has 
forgotten that last time. It was her 
fault. She was light, inconstant; but 
she was the first to recover composure 

"Fancv meeting you," she said. 
"Have you been long in town?" 

He, his eyes fixed on the delicate 
face with its set smile, and his mind 
full of the sweet, tearful one be had 
kissed three years before, replied 
mechanically, " I arrived yesterday. 
I came down to be married, you 
know." 

"Did you indeed? I am glad to 
hear it," was the quick response with 
smiling lips. But tbe eyes did not 
smile; they were bright and hard as 
steel. "1 hope you will be happy." 

Still with his eyes on her face, as 
in a dream, he said slowly, "Thank 
youl yes — I — I am sure to be." 

"Then you will be more fortunate 
than the majority of your fellows," 
she said. "But when is it to be?" 

As she said this she raised her eyes 
to his — those deep, dark, grey eyes 
— and gave him a long, long look. 

And then tbe fierce desire, the 
stamping down of which had cost him 
so much anguish, sprang into being 
again, and away went prudence, 
honor, — everything, before that look. 

"Never, Ella," he cried hoarsely, 
drawing nearer as he spoke — "never! 
unless you will marry me. Come with 
me now. I am afraid to let you out 
of my sight. Come, my darling, I 
know that you love me. You couldn't 
look at me like that and not ca>-e. 
Oh, if you only knew how I have 
wanted you!" 

His eyes were burning ; he trem- 
bled all over, as he waited for her 
answer. 

"You do me too much honor," she 
said, in coldly sweet tones. "I am 
sorry I cannot accept your offer, but, 
you see, my husband expects me home 
to dinner. Goorf-day. Don't forget 
to send me some cake." 

And she continued her way, a little 
smile of triumph disturbing the calm 
of her face as she said to herself: "I 
thought he couldn't have forgotten." 



Nearly Half A Century* 

Forty-seven years of constant and health- 
ful progress and growth has put the 



New Engla,^ 
Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 



of Boston, Mass , at the head (both in size and 
standing) oi musical institutions in Amenta. 
Comprehensive in plan, moderate in price, 
thorough in practice and famous /cr results. 
GEO. W. CHADWIOK, Mu.eic.al Director. 
Send for .in illustrated catalogue tu 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 14, 1900. 



Southern Pacific Co.— Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO : 
[Main Line. Foot of Market Street] 



leave] From May 13, 1900 [arrive 

*7:00a Beulcia, Suisun, Elmlra, Vacavllle, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 p 
*7:00 A Shasta Express— Davis, Williams (for Bartlett Springs). Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff, Portland *7:45 p 

**7:30a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallej o.Napa, Calls toga, Santa Rosa *6:15 p 

*8:O0a Davis. Woodland, Knights Landing. Marys ville. Oroville *7:45 p 

*8:00a Atlantic Express. Ogden and East *11:45 a 

*8:30 a San Jose, Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placervllle. 

Marysvllle. Chico, Red Bluff. *4:15 p 

*8:30 A Oakdale, Chinese (for Yosemite), Sonora, Carters *4:15 p 

*9:00 A Haywards, Niles. and way stations *11:45 A 

*9:O0a Los Angeles Expre-s — Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced and Fresno *6:45 p 

* 9:30 a Vallej o.Martlnez, and way stations *6:45 p 

*10:00a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago *5:15 P 

*11,-00a Niles, Llvermore, Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia, Porterville *4:15 P 

*12:00m Haywards, Niles, and way stations *2:45 P 

tl:00P Sacramento River Steamers t5:00 A 

*3:00p Haywards, Niles and way stations *5:45 P 

*4,-00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, Callstoga. Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

*4:O0p Benicia, Winters, Sacramento, Woodland, Knight's Landing 

Marysville. Oroville *10:45 a 

*4:30p Niles. San Jose, and Stockton *7:15 p 

*5:00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles *9:45 A 

*5:00p Fresno Passenger — Martinez, Lathrop. Stockton, Merced, 

Berenda (Raymond for Yosemite), Fresno *12:15 P 

*5^0 P New Orleans Express — Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
geles, Demlng, E) Paso, New Orleans, and East *8:45 A 

*5:30p Santa Fe Route— Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East °6:45 p 

*6:00p Haywards, Nile*, and San Jose °7:45 a 

£6:00 p Vallejo *12:15 p 

*6:00p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne. Omaha, Chicago *11:45 a 

•6:00 P Oriental Mail— Ogden, Denver. Omaha, Chicago "4:15 p 

£7:00 P Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations t9:55 p 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland Puget Sound and East °8:15 A 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

I7:45a Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa Cruz & Principal Way Stations $8:05p 
*8:15a Newark, Centerville. San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruzand way stations *620 p 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations t/10:50 a 

•4:15 p Newark. San Jose, Los Oatos *8:50 a 

Q4:I5 p Glenwood, Felton, Santa Cruz c8:50a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— °7:15, 9:00. and 11:00 
A. M.. Jl rfX). "2:00, 13:00. *4:00, $5:00 and *6:00 p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— •6KX>. 8:00, 10:00 A. M.; tl2.-00, *1:00 
J2 :00, »3 :00. J4 :00, *5 :00 p. M, 

C OAST Division (Broad Gauge) . (Third and Townsend streets ). 

t6:l0A Ocean View. South San Francisco t6:30 P 

f7rfK)A San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 p 

J7:30a Sunday Excursion for San Jose. Santa Cruz, Pucific Grove 

and Principal Way Stations $8:35 p 

•9:00A SanJose.TresPinos. Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Paso Robles. 

San LuIb Obispo, Surf, Lompoc, and principal waystatlons *4:10 p 

•10:40 A San Jose and way stations *6:35 a 

•ll :30 a San Jose, Los Gatos and way stations *5:30 P 

T2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto. Santa Clara, San 

Jose.Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove T10:36 a 

J3:30p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 

+4:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:45 A 

+5:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos. and Principal Way Stations +9:00 a 

*5:30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations +8:35 a 

•6:30p San Jose and Way Stations +8:00 a 

611 :45 p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 P 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. 'Daily. + Sundays excepted, 

t Sundays only. 6 Saturdays only. 
a Saturday and Sunday. c Sunday and Monday 

The Pacific Transfer Compant will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
in formation. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, July 26, 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. August 21, 1900 

Doric (via Honolulu)., Saturday, September 15. 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, October 10. 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



SS " Australia," Wednesday. July 25, 1900. 2 pm. 
S3 "Alameda." Wednesday, Aug. 8. at 8 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Cape town, South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS CO 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 




City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N. E. corner Eidy and Mason streets. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blahco & B. Bbdn. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 
place in the world. ___ 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DCJNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314-31B-318 Main St. 
Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



C^j.. |f,U»iic For barberB, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
r)r|lxr|r~S tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tailers, etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 



Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco. Tel. 5610 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TibcronFebky— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00. 11:00 a.m; 12:35. 3:30. 5:10. 630 p. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30p.M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11:30P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8 M. 9:30, 11:00 A. M.; 1:30. 3:30, 5*0. 6:20 p. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10.730.9:20.11:10 A. M.: 12:45, 3:40. 5:15 p. M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6 :35 p. u. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40, 11:10 A. M.; 1:40, 3:40. 5:05. 6:25 p. m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect April 15. 1900 


Arrive in San FranclBco 


Week days 


Sundays 


Destinations 


Sundays 


Week days 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 pm 


Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 AM 
6:05 PM 
7:35 PM 


8:40 am 
10:25 am 
6.-20 PM 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


10:25 am 
630 PM 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 


Hopland. Ukiah 


7:35 pm 


10:25 am 
6:20 PM 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 am 


Guerneville 


7:35 pm 


1025 AM 
6:20 PM 


7:30 am 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 

8:00 AM 

5:00 pm 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 

Sebastopol 


9:15 AM 
6:05 pm 


8:40 AM 
620 PM 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


10:40 am 
7:35 pm 


1025 AM 
620 pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs: at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs: at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Kelsey ville. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Uklah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake. Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Pomo. Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hull ville, Booneville, Philo. Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whltes- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, 
Westport, Usal Willlts, Laytonville, Cummlngs, Bell's Springs, Harris, 01- 
sen's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. 



R.X.RYAN, Gen. Pass Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 11 A. M.: July 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30. 
August 4, change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B.C. and Puget Sound Ports. 11 A. M., July 5.10,15- 
20, 25, 30, August 4, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 P. M„ July 2, 7, 12, 17, 22. 
27, August 1, and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 A. M.. 
July 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22. 26. 30, August 3. and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford (San Luis Obispo). Santa 
Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los AngeleB) 11 A. M., July l. s, 
12. 16, 20, 24, 28, August Land every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 A M., 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notioe. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Agts., 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

Only railway owning Its own tracks between San Francisco 
and Chicago, 2550 miles. Personally conducted excur- 
sions in Pullman Tourist Sleeping Cars, three times every 
week to Kanxus City, Chicago, and all points East. Oct 
handsome folders, rates and full information at 628 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. 



Santa Fc 
Route 



/V*» ptr tmpy 10 tnli 




ESTABLISHED JULY SO. 1SS6 



.(iv.ii ttimrtftmt. »i oo 



News J BETTER 




Ko/. LXl 



SAN FRANCISCO, JULY 21, 1900. 



Number 3. 



ft 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
SH Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at Han Francisco Post- 
office as Second-class Matter. 
The office ol the S. F. NEWS LETTER In London. Eng.. Is at 10 Lcadcn- 
hall Bldg. No. I Leadcnhall street, (Fred. A. Marriott. Representative' 
where Information may be obtained regarding subscriptions and 
advertising rates. Paris, France. Office, No. 37 Avenue de I, 'op- 
All social Items, announcements, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
publication In the current number of the NEWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

THE time for writing the obituary of the Belgian hare 
fad arrived even sooner than anticipated. 

EACH time Jake Rudolph is yanked temporarily from 
oblivion, the police seem to be the agency. 

ND now a few remarks from James Taylor Rogers 
would be in order; also, possibly, incredib'e. 

rRINCE TUAN may be crazy, as reported, but no plea 
of insanity should be permitted to save bis hide. 

ftLREADY Rockhill is spoken of as Conger's successor, 
but there seems to be no mad scramble for the place. 

NO fate could be too bad Cor any correspondent who 
at this time would manufacture Chinese horrors at 
space rates. 

PASSING years strengthen the belief that bad W. W. 
Astor not been born rich he might have made a fairly 
good mule driver. 

WITH Croker and Hill both on the executive committee 
of New York the constant presence of a referee will 
be necessary. 

IT is a little early to be figuring on what China owes us. 
The debt is growing so fast that any present calculation 
would be upset. 

SAM Waller, instead of mixing up in the Board of 
Pharmacy election should pay that body the respect 
of resigning from it. 

JEALOUS? among nations may mean murder, and it 
is unfair to have innocent people slaughtered for the 
promotion of hoggishness. 

IT is well that Chretien, blackleg lawyer, was not per- 
mitted to start on his journey, for probably China as 
his contemplated destination was a bluff. * 

S CHINAMAN and a Filipino at Manila have been 
caught in a big scheme of counterfeiting. The United 
States acquired a variety of things by taking in the archi- 
pelago. 

CHINA'S Minister to this country may to a certain ex- 
tent have lost his head, but it does not adorn a pole. 
After all, the despised Western civilization has points of 
superiority. 

THERE is nothing surprising in the fact that Nome is 
a fake. Almost any Pacific Coast paper can find 
material in its files upon which to claim the right to say 
"We told you so. " 

THE Chronicle now follows the lead set by the News 
Letter, and warmly advocates the construction of a 
sub-way under Market street. Sooner or later the thing 
must be done, and it might just as well be sooner, before 
more lives are sacrificed on this congested thoroughfare. 



ROCKEFELLER says that 11,000, would be a small 
price to pay for the privilege of being free from 
worry, but most men able toyield such a sum would rather 
keep it, and worry on. 

nTACOMA transit company has been censured by a 
coroner's jury fur carelessness in killing 43 people. 
Fancy how the soul of the corporation would writhe, if 
the corporation had a soul ! 

A YOUNG woman of the stage has been describing the 
manner in which thirteen men proposed to her. O 
course she rejected them all, demonstrating that the un- 
popular numeral is not necessarily unlucky. 

SENATOR Clarke has raised the wages of bis miners. 
Now the Daly crowd will keep tally on every extra 
cent expended, and swear it was to promote corruption; 
particularly if Daly have to see the raise. 

LI Hung Chang has been looked upoc as the Grand Old 
Man of China, but in the light of events China does 
not seem to have that kind of an old man. Li's distinction, 
above that of his fellows, appears in that he does not run 
a laundry. 

WHEN Wyatt Earp was last here a muscular gentle- 
man poked him in the jaw, which he had wagged 
unduly, and upon his return to Nome somebody else intro- 
duced into his system an abrupt and large caliber piece of 
metal. Often the mighty fall, but they seldom fall twice. 

ASSISTANT Postmaster General Heath seems to have 
coppered the story that he was to lose his job for 
putting a lot of thieves in the postal service of Cuba. The 
administration does not seem to mind a little stealing, 
more or less, and Heath has been useful to it as well as to 
his old friends who are now in jail. 

S STRANGE fatality attends the making of crackers 
in this city. The Standard Biscuit Factory has just 
been burned down for the second time, and it is only about 
two years ago since the American Biscuit Works went up 
in flame and smoke. The latter calamity was directly 
traceable to an earthquake which had cracked the brick 
lining of an oven, but no such explanation is possible for 
the recent conflagration. 

THE military authorities have a grim sense of humor 
which is all their own. Recently they sentenced a 
soldier who had committed some serious offense to ninety- 
nine years' residence in the Alcatraz sanitarium. Soldier- 
ing is admittedly a healthy profession, but still the term 
seems a trifle exaggerated. Or can it be that our officers, 
inflated by the lust of power, have got in the way of be- 
lieving that their authority extends beyond the grave. 

JUDGE Bahrs is to be asked by the Southern Pacific to 
reverse himself, ai>d great is the acclaim of corpora- 
tion baiters. If his decision was wrong, he will be glad of 
the opportunity. If it was right, he can reiterate and for- 
tify it. The infallible Judge is so rare an article that he 
is not believed to be of earth. How could perfection be 
expected when every brief space a lot of miscellaneous 
politicians get together and enact a mess of laws without 
coherency and often without sense? Law-making is not a 
science, but a habit, and the administration of half-baked 
statutes in a manner wholly unquestionable would be pos- 
sible only to a god ; and gods do not get among the boys 
and hustle for election. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



July 21, 1900. 



HOW CAN THE POWERS BRING CHINA TO TERMS? 

IF it be true that China is really armed, as it is said she 
is, there can be no doubt but that she can hold her own 
against all the world. That is what the great General 
Gordon said thirty years ago, and no man had ever such 
an opportunity to learn of the true inwardness of China 
as he. Moreover, he furnished the facts that justified his 
judgment. The Celestial Empire can put more fighting 
men in the field than all Europe and America combined, 
and with all the advantages of defense, locomotion, sup- 
plies and base in their favor. If the foreigners were to 
force their way from the sea coast, their troops would 
encounter an ever increasing mass of fighting humanity 
that would prove overwhelming. The powers may destroy 
the seaports, but that is about all they can do. 

The gravity of the present situation can only be under- 
stood by giving due emphasis to the fact that this is a 
movement of the Chinese people, regardless of dynasty or 
Government. The rising of a people is a much more 
momentous event than a clash with a Government. Never 
before have the Chinese, as a people, taken an interest in 
the foreign wars waged by the ruling dynasty. Not one 
in ten of them have even yet so much as heard of the war 
with Japan, and the earlier conflicts between the Peking 
authorities and certain Western powers were too brief 
and too well glossed over to cause any national uprising, 
or stir the empire beneath the placid surface of its hum- 
drum life. 

That is where Europe and America have made their 
great mistake. With the easy coast victories won by the 
Japs we thought China was ready to crumble to pieces at 
a single touch. We began to talk as if the empire were al- 
ready dismembered, and unfortunately two, at least, of 
the Powers acted as if it were. The aggressions of the 
past four or five years have set the common people in a 
frenzy. Russia came thundering down the plains and val- 
leys of Manchuria and of Northern China with her iron 
horse, laden with soldiers, guns, ammunition, workmen, 
etc., and all China awoke to what that meant. Then Ger- 
many one fine morning entered Kia Chou bay and proceeded 
to annex the surrounding country in the rudest and rough- 
est way, and without so much as asking "by your leave." 
And perhaps worse still, as Lord Salisbury said the other 
day, Western publications began to be filled with the 
plainest proposals for wholesale dismemberment, and 
these, we may be very sure, were carefully gathered up 
by the intelligent agents China has found it to her inter- 
est to keep abroad, and made known to the governing and 
educated classes of China. These things all meant an as- 
sault upon all that the Chinese hold dear and sacred. Our 
losses at Tien Tsin, the probable massacre of the foreign 
Ministers at the Court of Peking, and the attacks along 
the line of the Russian railroad, render it certain that the 
Chinese are desperately in earnest and that they mean 
mischief without end. 

The question arises as to what the powers are to do 
about it. 

In the first place, it is important to know for a cer- 
tainty whether the foreign ministers at Peking be dead or 
alive. At this present time of writing the Chinese 
ministers abroad are very anxious to have it believed that 
the foreigners in Peking are all well, and under the pro- 
tection of the government. But the ominous fact remains, 
that they cannot put this government in communication 
with its minister. Lying, to any class of Chinese, is as 
easy as eating rice with chop sticks. They may be speak- 
ing the truth in this case, but we do not believe them. 
The evidence points strongly the other way. If our 
trusted representatives have been cruelly butchered, no 
mercy should be shown their slayers. Notice should be 
served on the inhabitants of Peking to make their resi- 
dences elsewhere, and then the city should be turned into 
a vast monument of ashes, to serve as an object lesson to 
the Mongolian mind for all time. Then Mr. Wu at Wash- 
ington, and all the Chinese Consuls in this country, should 
be arrested at once and cast into prison, pending the re- 
ceipt of fuller and more satisfactory information. The 
only way to make a Chinaman tell the truth is to put his 
neck in danger. The Chinese fleet should be captured or 
destroyed, the forts and certain sea ports should receive 
as liberal a bombarding as the allied fleets are capable of 
giving them, and all this by way of reprisals for whatever 



may have happened to the world's ambassadors in Peking, 
and for beginning a barbarous war on civilization. 

Then as to the policy of the future. The cry throughout 
the Mongolian Empire to-day is: — "China for the Chinese." 
Very well! Let the powers take them at their word and 
adopt a policy of non-intercourse. Let the powers now 
at war with China never sue for peace, but withdraw from 
the country, blockade its coasts and rivers and effectually 
cut it off from that intercourse which it now disdains, and 
of which it has proven itself so shockingly unworthy. It 
is now semi-barbarism against civilization. In other 
words: — China against all the world. China has had the 
first say, and has struck the first blow, and we know 
what we have to expect. If there are any people alive 
who would object to this course because of the little trade 
they might lose, they are not fit to live. The man who 
would compromise for the torture and butchery of his 
countrymen, by a little gain is, thank God I not an Ameri- 
can, whatever else he may prove to be! Moreover there 
is nothing in the China trade to tempt anybody to forget 
his manhood. The balance is always against this country. 
John Chinaman has little to sell us except tea. The one 
matter of ceasing to buy tea from China, would bring her 
to her knees in short order. There can now be no open 
door or spheres of influence in China, without a conquest 
of 400,000,000, and that would be a quarrel which it would 
be well to leave alone; especially as it can be better 
handled in another way. 

THE SALE OF WAR IMPLEMENTS. 

SOME way ought to be found to put a stop to the pro- 
miscuous sale of war implements by the great manu- 
facturers, who, being given a monopoly of their home 
markets, owe their respective governments and people 
something in return. The Filipinos had no difficulty in 
obtaining as maDy German Mausers as they wanted, for 
the purpose of shooting down Americans. King Menelik, 
away in the fastnesses of Abyssinia, was better armed 
than the Italian soldiers. How the Boers were found to 
possess all the latest and best weapons surprised the 
world. Now, even the unprogressive Chinese before 
Tientsin have better armaments than the combined 
powers. Two singular things always happen in this con- 
nection. First, the weapons in the possession of these 
newly armed warriors are invariably found to be better 
than those manufactured for home use, and, secondly, they 
reach the points where they are wanted, whether it be 
the heart of Africa or the northern boundaries of China, 
without anybody being the wiser. How this is done we 
do not pretend to say, but it is clear that the manufac- 
turers must be the principal instruments in procuring the 
secret and safe export of their wares. The powers 
should agree among themselves to stop this thing. It 
could be easily done by more methods than one. Firearms 
are now contraband of war, and they ought to be made 
contraband of peace. It is clear that their promiscuous 
sale cannot be much longer tolerated. 

AS TO LI HUNG CHANG & CO. 

THE press dispatches are telling some wonderful tales 
of the friendship of Li Hung Chang for foreigners and 
of his great desire to protect the Legations at Peking. 
We do not believe one of them. The evidence is over- 
whelming that the Dowager Empress and Prince Tuan 
are in control at Peking, and that they have long been pre- 
paring for the very outbreak that has now taken place. 
The troops and Boxers as far north as Manchuria are all 
well armed with Mausers and Maxims, which certainly 
could not have reached them except through the authori- 
ties. Yet we find Li Hung Chang suddenly called by im- 
perial edict to Peking and appointed Viceroy of the great 
province in which it is situated. That edict could only 
have been issued by the Empress and Tuan, the deadly 
enemies of the foreigners. Why do they want to clothe a 
Viceroy with power to thwart their most cherished pur- 
poses? Either all the news we have received from China 
is false or Li Hang Chang has been called to Peking to 
promote ends the very opposite of those represented. Sir 
Henry Blake, the British Governor of Hongkong, has, 
however, stripped the mask off the wily Viceroy's preten- 
sions. The Governor shows that since the beginning of the 
year 50,000 Mausers and many Maxims have been landed at 



July it, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Canton to the order of Li Hunt; Chang, and have 
been distributed among the Boxers of the pro 
whence an attack upon Shanghai is at this moment in 
preparation. That fixes the responsibility of Li Hung 
Chang by an authority not to be questioned. The British 
are reported to have had the intention to arrest Li at 
Hongkong the other day, and it is a great pity they did 
not do it. He would at least have been a valuable hos- 
tage, and if he wants to exercise his influence at Peking 
in favor of the foreigners he could as well have used it from 
a Hongkong prison, with his life probably depending upon 
his success. It really seems as if the powers are not tak- 
ing hold of these matters as if they meant it. After the 
receipt of the early telegrams from Sir Robert Hart and 
others they could and should have been in Peking within 
three days. They ought not now to hand their passports 
to the different Chinese embassies, and all the envoys 
ought to be held as hostages until the Peking government 
has been heard from. As to the meetings being held by 
the Chinese, at which they offer their services to Uncle 
Sam to go and fight the Boxers: it is simply too thin. It 
would be a cheap and safe way of getting out of the coun- 
try. "For ways that are dark and tricks that are vain 
the heathen Chinee is peculiar." The sooner we realize 
that the better. 

"THE ACADEMY OF LOST ARTS." 

COULD a more scholastic-stirring title than the above 
be devised? The Academy of Lost Arts hath arisen 
in Berkeley, and the soul of the antiquarian rejoiced when 
he read. . . . But— but he is nowhere in it. The 
arts in question, purely feminine in gender, have only 
been lost since the dear, dead days of our grandmothers, 
and resolve themselves into hemming, felling, stitching 
and attendant etceteras. They are to be revived by our 
sweet co-eds under strictly feminine supervision, and, sad 
to say, our modern mercantile spirit revives with them, 
for the co-eds are not only to learn but to earn; their 
pretty tucks and seams are on sale, and they hope thereby 
to add to their minute scholastic incomes whereby to add 
to scholastic bread and butter. So runs the tale; but is 
there not perchance a rider to this bread and butter 
problem? May not the Lost Arts be spelt with an "H," 
and lost Hearts be pre-occupying the Berkeley tutorial 
mind? There is much glamorous witchery in the glint of 
a needle, and the scientific young woman who has to learn 
the art of patching and mending is not eligible, despite 
her college cap and golden hair, for the struggling student 
whose fiancee must be able to help in the modest home his 
fancy furnishes. There may be little furniture save that 
of fancy, and the problem of making both ends meet re- 
quires some tuition other than that of Euclid. Even 
Homer and Virgil, Euripides and Horace can throw little 
light on the subject. But grandmamma knew, and it 
might be weir to cultivate some of grandmamma's pretty 
little ways, however nonsensical they may seem to her 
granddaughter. A further hint on the subject is supplied 
by the allusion to the possible cookery classes if the sew- 
ing classes succeeded. Another lost art in very sooth, as 
some of our suffering menfolk can testify. Love waits 
upon digestion in these modern days. In olden time — 

The Queen of Hearts she made some tarts, 
And our modern Knaves of Hearts wait to inspect the 
tarts ere bearing their Queens away. 



AN AUSTRALIAN JOURNALIST ON OUR WOMEN. 
fjf ISS DARCHY, the Australian lecturess now touring 
1' V. the States, has given a prominent Sydney journal her 
impressions of San Francisco in general and its women in 
particular. Let there be no anxious flutter in the 
devecots, no preening and preparing for indignant retort. 
Miss Darchy, professedly an admirer of her own sex, deals 
very kindly with our womenfolk, bestowing on them more 
appreciative glances than always fall from the eyes of the 
passing tourist. They have an original type of their own, 
suggestive of the Parisienne; their walk, attire, and 
manners are un-English, their very voices have an attract- 
ive cadence which differentiates them from the "high-keyed 
Americans" usually encountered on the European contin- 
ent. All of which is more than satisfactory. But it is 
the journalistic side of life which specially interests one 



who Is an experienced journalist In her own land. The 
characteristics of our more prominent female journalist* 
have Impressed their Auitrnllon sister who hits off their 
peculiarities with a nicety which will cause much heart- 
burning, envving, and hair-tearing in the ranks of the pen. 
To Bavley Millard's notice we commend the item that 
Miss Craft is a tall handsome woman who looks as if she 
quite scorned the Idea of a man's superiority. Lilian 
Ferguson, the writer, to her regret, she did not meet, 
but Helen Dare "of the Examiner is as smart as that 
smart paper could wish, and woe betide the poor individ- 
ual she undertakes to make 'copy' out of. She will riddle 
him through and through and then publish all her own 
sentiments declaring that they emanate from his own 
brain." Mrs. Pratt receives particular attention as illus- 
trating the extraordinary — and to alien eyes outrageous 
— demands San Francisco makes on its female journalists. 
Her capacity for universal work, from the having "to 
diagnose the last feelings of a condemned criminal" to the 
writing of a musical or art critique, fairly takes Miss 
Darchy's breath away. In Australia they don't send 
women to interview criminals, condemned or otherwise, 
and critics are supposed to mind their own business. But 
the plum undoubtedly falls to piquante Florence Matheson, 
"par excellence a 'press-woman' with a dash of the 
Bohemian in her which lifts her out of the ordinary run- 
ning altogether. A pretty face, eyes full of fun and in- 
telligence, lovely grey hair worn high off her forehead, she 
will tell you, with a cigarette between her teeth, her 
black eyebrows arching expressively, the most amusing 
stories of her literary career." Oui-da! Won't some of 
the other "pens" sit up? And won't the Club women 
watch eagerly, nervously, for the next instalment. For 
there is another letter to follow, dealing, among other 
matters, with our women's clubs. 

WHAT HAS NOT BEEN DONE IN CHINATOWN. 

THE bubonic plague scare in Chinatown is a thing of 
the past; other Chinese troubles have wiped it from 
the minds of men. But the rotten condition of Chinatown 
as a dwelling place for human beings still remains to 
taint the commonwealth and present the four outstretched 
fingers with the thumb at the nose toward the white 
man's law and law-makers. The health of the city de- 
mands that this ulcerous spot be cured and cleansed; 
that the streets be paved ; that no one be permitted to 
live beneath the level of the sidewalk; that the cubic air 
ordinance be enforced; that the Chinese be compelled to 
observe the same rules of cleanliness and space that ob- 
tain in the white quarters. Chinatown is now in just as 
bad a condition, if not worse than when the Board of 
Health started its work of quarantine and purification. 
In roping in the threatened district holes were dug in 
which to plant the posts. Although the ropes and posts 
have been removed, the boles remain to scar the thor- 
oughfares and maim the unwary passer-by. The streets 
are by their very structure invitations to filth. They are 
in their present condition irresistible garbage places. 
They ought to be paved and washed, and kept washed. 
The white man's burden in Chinatown is one of gold. 
The white man owns most of the property, collects 
most of the rents. And, we fear, is quite satisfied 
with the present condition, even if it menace the 
health of the whole city. Never mind ]ust at present 
talking about burning and removing the Chinese quarter 
to some outlying district; but do the next best thing. In- 
sist with the full vigor of the law and its officers that 
Chinatown be kept as clean as any other portion of San 
Francisco. We have had a lot of talk, a lot of hot-mouthed 
speeches and editorials, a lot of pictures in local and East- 
ern papers, and a big plague scare that has frightened 
all the United States. But we have done nothing, abso- 
lutely nothing, to rid ourselves of the sore spot. We need 
something stronger than words, something bigger than 
the cheap prejudice of party politics. We need the 
broom, the brush, the hose, and the paver. Is it a won- 
der the Mongol laughs at our law when we are so impo- 
tent to enforce it? 

IT is cheering to- know that attorney Lowenthal is being 
looked for by the police; also cheering to know, in ad- 
dition, that they can't find him. What a blessed relief if 
he should prove to be permanently lost. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1900. 



GUERILLA WARFARE IN SOUTH AFRICA AND THE 
PHILIPPINES. 

BOTH the United States and Grea'o Britain would like 
to take their troops away from their present engage- 
ments in the Philippines and South Africa, and despatch 
them to China, but it cannot be done because they are 
needed just where they are. Yet the wars in the two 
countries named are practically over. There is not now a 
ghost of a chance of either the Boers or the Filipinos 
succeeding. Guerilla warfare is simply intensifying and 
prolonging the agony, without in any manner changing 
the final result. There will be fewer Filipinos to pacify, 
and not so many Boers to make future trouble — that is all. 
We wanted Manila as a "stepping off " place on the way 
to China. Well, we have got what we wanted but dare 
not "step off," even in this hour of direst extremity. If 
we had so dared we had enough ships and men there to 
have captured Pekin, and relieved our minister and his 
associates, within three or four days of giving the word. 
But the time has gone by for that. The Foreign Am- 
bassadors are past being rescued, and the Boxers have 
had time to bring their forces to the coast, and probably 
half a million men could not now dislodge them. It seems 
as if the "open door" policy has gone by the board. All 
the great powers have clearly been reckoning without 
their host. They thought they had only to agree among 
themselves and the thing was done. John Chinaman was 
not considered at all. But when we had almost got our 
"stepping off" place ready, and the other powers had 
appropriated the harbors and forts around the Chinese 
Coast, up starts John and slams the door in our faces. 
It is not any too certain that we can open it again, but if 
we can, the question arises as to whether the game is 
worth the candle. Russia must wish about this time that 
she had let Japan alone in 1894. As to the Boers, they 
are still pegging away from behind their kopjes and re- 
fusing to be conquered. That the military difficulties are 
not yet over in either South Africa or the Philippines is 
obvious from the fact that neither our own, nor the 
British Government, is willing to send any considerable 
number of the troops to China. That was a cute answer 
that Lord Roberts returned to his minister of war the 
other day. Lord Lansdowne telegraphed to ask "if he 
could spare any troops for China?" "Bobs," not caring to 
give a blunt negative, replied that "he thought he might, 
if he were allowed to go with them." Which was about as 
good as saying that if they took any of his men he wanted 
no more of his South African job. 

AS TO STATE AND MUNICIPAL TAXATION. 

IT appears that local taxation in the city and State cf 
New York is in pretty much the same muddle that it 
is in San Francisco and this State generally. The New 
York business men, however, have taken the matter in 
hand and propose to see what can be done about it. The 
New York Chamber of Commerce has decided to create a 
standing committee on State and municipal taxation, and 
its action may well be watched with a view to the pur- 
suance of a similar plan here. Such a committee will, no 
doubt, have considerable influence not only on public opin- 
ion, but also upon the Legislature and the City Fathers. 
The reasons assigned for this action in the report of the 
Chamber of Commerce constitute a severe arraignment of 
the present system, but no severer than might be truly 
alleged against the condition of affairs in this municipality. 
There, as here, the expenditures for State and local ad- 
ministration are rapidly increasing, the burden of taxation 
is becoming heavier, and new sources of revenue are con- 
stantly being resorted to. The enterprises of individuals 
and corporations are driven from the State by unwise 
levies made upon them. The incorporation of joint stock 
companies is hampered. Property is taxed, and the evi- 
dences of debt upon the same are also laid under contribu- 
tion. Corporations of a similar character are unequally 
burdened. There is a heavy tax on inheritances, and the 
collection of the tax is subject to extraordinary expenses, 
often apparently for political purposes. The taxation of 
franchises of a public nature proceeds on lines which may 
or may not be essentially just, but are certainly novel and 
require mature consideration. It is by no means sure 
that taxes are collected with reasonable certainty. The 



basis of assessments is not constant, and the purposes for 
which the Board of Equalization was created are inade- 
quately served by it. All these allegations are quite as 
true in San Francisco as in New York, and the time has 
fully come when remedial measures should be adopted here 
as well as there. Our Chamber of Commerce, or Board of 
Trade, or some other competent local body, should take 
notice and govern themselves accordingly. License fees 
on private businesses have recently been mounting up at 
a marvelously rapid rate. The right to do business is not 
upon economic principles a justifiable thing to tax. As 
well might we attempt to tax a man's right to labor for 
his living. 

A BITTER ATTACK ON BRYAN. 

IT appears that the record of William Jennings Bryan, 
the Democratic nominee for the Presidency, on the sub- 
ject of imperialism, will not bear close examination. The 
fact has been established that he went to Washington and 
importuned Democratic Senators to vote for the ratifica- 
tion of the treaty of Paris, which rendered the ownership 
of the Philippines and imperialism possible. To make the 
matter worse, he did not believe in the treaty, but urged 
his party friends that to kill it would be to deprive the 
Democracy of its very best piece of capital for use in the 
coming campaign. Some seventeen Democratic votes were 
thus won over to its support, whilst it was only ratified by 
a majority of three. Senator Hoar, in defending his course 
in supporting Mr. MeKinley, said before the Massa- 
chusetts Club a few evenings ago, that "while the treaty 
of Paris was before the Senate, Mr. Bryan wrote and 
talked to Senators urging ratification, with the result 
that seventeen of his followers voted for the treaty." 
Continuing, the Senator said: "I think I do Mr. Bryan no 
injustice when I say that he took that course simply to 
keep the question open for an issue in this campaign." In 
deciding his own course the Senator stated that "he pre- 
ferred to be with the man who was responsible for the 
treaty, believing it to be right, rather than with the man 
who was responsible for those IV votes, believing it to be 
wrong." From all of which it would appear that Mr. 
Bryan loses the only bit of real thunder in his whole pro- 
gramme, besides forfeiting his character for ingenuous- 
ness. 

RAINS HAVE COME AT LAST TO INDIA. 

COPIOUS rains have fallen over the greater part of In- 
dia, but of course it will be several months before the 
new crops come in. Meanwhile the poor farmers have 
got to live, or die of hunger. Rain is excellent in its way, 
but human beings cannot live on water. The land re- 
mains to be tilled and seed must be sown, and weary 
months must be passed ere the harvest comes. It ap- 
pears that the cattle employed in tillage have nearly all 
died of starvation, and the grain required for seed has 
been fed to the hungry. When the rain came the difficulty 
arose as to how to plow the land without cattle. A smart 
American at once invented a very light, sharp plow that 
could be drawn by men. They did so well, as a makeshift, 
that the Indian Government promptly set to work to have 
them manufactured on a large scale and distributed 
around among the peasantry. The official reports show 
that 6,000,000 persons are, in one way or another, main- 
tained by the Indian Government, which has already ex- 
pended $26,000,000 in direct relief, $10,000,000 in advances 
for the purchase of seed and cattle, and $11,000,000 in 
loans to the native chiefs for distribution in the distressed 
States. No money, however, has proportionately gone 
so far or done so much good as that dispensed by the re- 
lief committees. To a starving family it is a long time 
yet to harvest. Contributions should not dry up yet 
awhile. 

UNCLE SAM needs transports again, and he must 
prepare to be bled. The owners of ships may be pa- 
triots from away back, friends of the administration, and 
shudder at the mention of democracy, but when it comes 
to hiring out their boats, that's different. Friendship, 
loyalty, and affection are not permitted to joggle the rule 
of trade, which is to get all you can out of anybody you 
can, including your uncle. 



July it, 1900. SAN Fll I KEWS LETT 5 

INCIDENTS IN Ghe CAREER of THE INDISPENSABLE MR. ROSE 



Br dOMN PULITZER BARTLETT. 



WHKN Augustus Rose entered the field of journalism 
be bad one object in view — to make himself indispen- 
sable to whatever paper with which be happened to be 
conrected. It took him onlj a few short months to reach 
the goal. He had the faculty for creating news. With 
this supremely modern accomplishment he began the bat- 
tle for bread and things with victory in sight. There are 
many newspapermen who can write and "dig" and gather 
the happenings that interest the public, but only to the 
chosen few is allotted the power of creating items of pub- 
lic moment. Mr. Rose was one of the few. 

Light complexioned and weazened as to face and fea- 
ture, he butted into the heart of the business wearing a 
perpetual grin. He began by reporting the doings of im- 
provement clubs and organizations whose excuse for being 
was the betterment of the streets and sewers of the out- 
lying districts. Of these clubs he had himself elected sec- 
retary and general advisor, so that in time he was in a 
position to furnish bis paper with everything they intended 
doing. Incidentally be was indispensable in preparing and 
having adopted resolutions favoring or denouncing the 
various movements with which the paper was in sympathy 
or at outs. 

"The indignant property owner" was the foundation of 
his stories. Scattered through every edition of the paper 
were articles in which the "indignant property owner " 
belched his wrath against the condition of the streets, 
sewers, and what not of his neighborhood. 

In the course of time, while making himself indispen- 
sable, Mr. Rose one day reported a balloon accident. An 
aeronaut dropped with a parachute, breaking his limbs 
in a frightful manner. Mr. Rose began his story, "An 
indignant property owner, while riding in a balloon yes- 
terday, fell," etc. The yarn concluded with "Had the 
streets been in better condition, as advocated by the Park 
Improvement Club, the chances are the indignant aero- 
naut would not have been so severely hurt." 

One day there was an agitation against a corporation 
which Mr. Rose's paper fought under all circumstances 
and conditions. The row was over a franchise. The "in- 
dignant property owners" of the neighborhood through 
which the right of way was desired, worked up a denun- 
ciatory agitation via the Rose route. The matter was 
finally taken up by the Board of Supervisors, and it was 
said by Mr. Rose that boodle had won the day, and that 
the franchise would be granted. The improvement club 
of which Mr. Rose was secretary passed burning resolu- 
tions advocating the lynching of the Supervisors in case 
they granted the franchise. These resolutions were 
printed exclusively in Mr. Rose's paper in feature type. 
While the matter was before the Supervisors, the Presi- 
dent of the lynching improvement club asked the secretary 
how they would hang the boodling City Fathers in case an 
opportunity presented itself. 

"Watch me," replied Mr. Rose, hoisting his vest and 
displaying a clothes line coiled about his waist. 

Another night Mr. Rose returned from the Park with 
the story of a man who had been battered beyond recog- 
nition in a runaway. Addressing the city editor, he said : 

"Both of his legs are broken; the right in two places, 
and the left in five. One arm is twisted out of joint and 
his skull is fractured. His spinal column has been put 
out of business, and the doctors say he will croak before 
morning." 

The city editor drew a watch from his pocket. It was 
after midnight. 

"Mr. Rose, you can catch the last car," he said. 

"Yes, I can just make it; but if the Park Improvement 
Club had its way, there would be an owl car " 

"Mr. Rose, you are detailed to get an ax and kill this 
man before we go to press. See that we have bis death 
gxc1u.si.vg1v 

"I'll do it," replied Mr. Rose, "if the paper will stand 
by me." 

One day five cents was cut out of Mr. Rose s expense 
bill. He resigned and went to work on a rival sheet, 
which for the following week was filled with the sayings 
and doings of indignant property owners and the lament- 



able condition of the sewers of the outlying districts. In- 
cidentally the paper from which he resigned was bom- 
barded with letters from the various improvement clubs, 
demanding to know why it no longer printed their doings. 
Each of these epistles bore the signature of Mr. Rose as 
general secretary. 

It so happened that the paper to which Mr. Rose had 
transferred his affections favored ail the corporations and 
monopolies that the other organ opposed and denounced. 
With the idea of making himself indispensable ever before 
him, Mr. Rose drafted up yards of resolutions advocating 
these corporations and denouncing the policy of the paper 
with which he had been connected. 

So a meeting of the editors of that paper was called, 
and it was decided to re-engage Mr. Rose at an increased 
salary. It was unanimously agreed that he was indis- 
pensable. 

From the moment he began to earn wages Mr. Rose 
purchased property in the outlying districts. With the 
aid of his newspaper connections and the resolutions he 
managed to have this property improved and made of 
some value. Wherever he bought a lot he organized an 
improvement club for the betterment of the street on 
which the property was located. In time he absolutely 
gained control of the various improvement organizations 
and was indispensable to them. He finally got to be the 
champion all around resolution writer of the town and 
started an agency for the preparation of resolutions for 
the praise or denunciation of corporations, trusts, mono- 
polies, boards of Supervisors and all sorts of public move- 
ments and projects. 

On the side he loaned money to the members of the 
newspaper staff at interest, and thus in time became 
financially indispensable to the humble reporter. He 
switched the improvement club vote and drafted resolu- 
tions for a candidate for office and received an appoint- 
ment. In his new job he soon became indispensable by 
terrorizing the head of the office with threats of denuncia- 
tion by the indignant property owners. As the man was 
an aspirant for re-election he prostrated himself before 
Mr. Rose and had himself indorsed until he was black in 
the face. 

Rose is the happiest man I know and holds a position 
unique in the newspaper world. The corporation which 
he has denounced and eulogized by turns has offered him a 
fortune to lose himself in a foreign land. But he has an 
assured position for life on the newspaper that fights the 
corporation. Some day he will own that newspaper. 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch_Whisky 

Importers - MACONDHAY A CO. 



I. Deutch, Proprietor. 



Telephone Main 5541 



Crystal Palace 

6 Kearny street, 12 Geary street, S. F., Cat. 
Choice Wines and Liquors. 

J. B. PON. I Pieebe Caebeeb, Pounder of Maison Tortoni. I C. Lalahne 

Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Franoisco 
Lunch, BO els. Dinner. 76 cts. Also, a la carte. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THBAWAK c^oiao.i89 3 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1809. These pens are " the 
best In the world." Sole agent for the United States, 
Mr. Henry Hoe, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1900. 




eaaurej' 



Wand 



CJe ohey no wand but Pitas ure '■$£ 

— Tom Jfoorwi *^^^B 




THE new Frawley Company at the Grand seems to 
have struck a fortunate pace in presenting in gor- 
geous style a torrid English melodramajby the name of The 
Great Ruby. The piece is built for scenery, and the actors 
come secoud in consideration. That is usually the case in 
English melodrama. The Grand Opera House stage was 
made for big scenic displays, and it gets one this time to 
satisfy the heart of the most exacting. There is a jewelry 
shop to beat Shreves', a balloon bigger than the one Prank 
Daniels used to float in, a couple of gaudy interiors to 
make the internal decoration of a $100 Easter egg look 
dull colored and cheap, and a cricket grounds in which a 
thousand or more people are painted in the scenery. 
Everything is rich and new, and the acting is in most 
parts all that the scenery could desire. 

The adventures of this almost priceless stone are con- 
stantly amusing and sometimes exciting. The situation 
in the balloon, where the good villain throws the bad vil- 
lain to his death is extremely effective. It lives up to the 
posters. On the plot I prefer not to dilate. Every situa- 
tion is gloriously independent of its predecessor and suc- 
cessor. You get the picture and the stress, and they are 
all one expects in a work of this kind. 

Corona Riccardo is the personification of strenuousness 
as the ruby-stealing adventuress. She has a hissing 
Spanishy temperament and no end of endurance. Every 
move an insinuation, every kiss a scar. She would play 
Carmen to blister the scenery. As the Indian Prince and 
reluctant accomplice Mr. Lackaye falls into the spirit of 
the play and contributes a large, vigorous melodramatic 
character; exaggerated of course, but exaggerated con- 
sistently and with a wide measure of art. Mary Van 
Buren, as the lady of the ruby, is enthusiastically good. 
There are dash and humor in her performance. And 
humor is almost as rare in woman as it is in melodrama. 
Mr. Northrup makes his first appearance with the new 
organization in the part of the young officer who has 
charge of the balloon. He has an easy bearing and gets 
all there is in the role. Mr. Duffield does a good bit of 
semi-comic character and Mr. Reynolds plays the main 
villain with the coolness and arrogance that win. 

To say that Morosco's has never staged a melodrama as 
this is staged is not all the praise that is due Mr. Frawley's 
production, which has the real metropolitan flavor. 
* * * 

The Liars, by Henry Arthur Jones, is one of the most 
delightful of the modern plays. It is a keen, brilliant, 
satirical picture of modern life. There is very little action 
in the physical sense of the word, but there is a great deal 
in the mental. The suspense is acute and the interest 
unflagging, and the characters drawn in sharp, keen 
lines. This is not the first time that Mr. Miller and his 
company have presented the piece to us, and it is not the 
first time that we have chronicled its success, and we are 
now fortunate in having several of the original actors in 
their original parts. It would be hard to imagine any- 
body playing Edward Palkner better than Morgan daes. 
In this role his peculiar intensity and repressed strength 
are given the best of vent. It is a remarkable study, sin- 
cere to the last note, and it gives us the superlative of 
Morgan. As Sir Christopher Deering, the genial cynic, a 
squire of Dames, Henry Miller, too, finds a part that fits 
him in every detail. Miller is a man of many graces, and 
as long as absolute enthusiasm and passion are not de- 
manded of him, he is a satisfying artist. Prank Lamb 
again gives us a unique creation of the waiter, as fine a 
bit of work as this man of many triumphs has ever ac- 
complished. In a below-stairs character Lamb occuDies 
a place by himself. Miss Anglin's Lady Jessica is as ever 
one of the most fragile and delicate creations in modern 
mummery. Its irony is fine, its wit is polished, its per- 
sonal spell is incontestable. Sadie Martinot came to the 
front for the second time this season as Lady Rosamond, 



a part that I can now say was hardly played for its full 
value in the former productions. Miss Martinot can play 
a woman of the world so as to make her seem that and 
only that. The cast is a remarkable one in that not a 
single part is badly played. The same scrupulous stage 
management and stage settings that have marked other 
Miller productions mark this one. The Liars is a play for 
the fastidious, and it is acted as well as the most fastidious 

could desire. 

* * * 

The revival of At Gay Coney Island at the California 
Theatre by Dunne and Ryley's comedians is hardly as suc- 
cessful as the original production given at the Columbia 
at different times by that incorrigible brace, Matthews and 
Bulger. Matthews and Bulger are in the cast and their 
work is well up to the mark, but the production as a whole 
has not the spring that it ought to have. There are too 
many actors who are embarrassed in the memory of their 
lines, and the stage management does not glide as it ought 
to glide; but despite an imperfect whole there are in- 
dividual bits that deserve the heartiest commendation. 
Bessie Tanhehill and Mary Marble are copiously good, and 
Tony Hart and Phil Riley are rich in comic enterprise, 
and" Miss Estee, who undertook Miss Courtney's part 
(Miss Courtney being ill) at a minutes notice plays with a 
deal of good fun. Miss Whalley, apart from the shortness of 
her memory, is an actress who makes fun a very serious 
thing. She is beautiful and she knows it and she knows 
that you know it. Beauty is her specialty and she plays 
it up to the last limit. That is all one has to say about 
her, and I am fatigued of saying that. 

* * * 

The Tivoli is entertaining well packed houses with a re- 
vival of Wang, with Edwin Stevens in the part he played 
in the original Tivoli production. There is perhaps only 
one man in the United States who will deny that Stevens 
is not better in the part than De Wolf Hopper, and that 
man's name is Hopper. Tbk piece marks the most poig- 
nant personal success that Stevens has scored in San 
Francisco in comic opera. Its fun is genuine and incessant. 
Ferris Hartman has not very much of a part as the 
keeper of the elephant, but all that there is in it and all 
that he interpolates are given with his usual hearty comi- 
cality. A particular hit is made by Grace Orr in the role 
of the Crown Prince. She is the neatest, nattiest yet 
since Edna Wallace. Annie Meyers, always to be de- 
pended upon, invests the widow with a lot of fun, and 
William Shuster is the fire-eating colonel — minus the fire. 
Georgie Cooper was taken ill shortly before the opening 
performance and Grace Field, who is known in private life 
as Gracie Shain, undertook her part, making a most 
creditable showing. Helen Merrill, Tom Greene, Harry 
Cashman and the others go to make up one of the best 
casts the Tivoli has had during a comic opera season. 

* # * 

A pretty, sympathetic performance, and graceful in 
the extreme, is that of Florence Roberts as the Greek 
girl in Ingomar. Her Parthenia is full of delicacy and 
poetry, and marks the honest, natural endeavor that was 
absent in Miss Roberts' Nethersole impersonations. Mr. 
Whittlesey presents a rugged, manly character in the 
title part. It is one of the best things that he has done. 
The play is old, and perhaps old-fashioned, but there is a 
lot of good stuff in it yet, and the Alcazar actors have 
gone about their work enthusiastically, and the audiences 
have been large and appreciative. New or old, it is the 
clean drama that wins with the regular clientele. 

* * * 

The principal novelty at the Orpheum is Captain Su- 
zanne, a pretty little picture play, half melodrama and 
half comic opera, written by Brandon Hurst, and acted 
with capital spirit by Lillian Burkhart and her little com- 
pany. This is Miss Burkhart's first appearance in tights 
and as a swordswoman. She handles the tights and foils 
with unexpected skill. The picture rather than the plot 
is what counts, and the fencing bout makes a strong ap- 
peal to everybody. 

* * * 

For the fifth week of the Miller season at the Columbia 
Theatre, beginning with next Monday night, a production 
of the farcical romance, His Excellency the Governor, will 
hold the boards. The play was originally produced in 



July 21, 1900. 



SAN FIU 1 KWS LETTER. 



this country at tbe Lyceum Theatre, New York, and It 
met with instant favor, resulting in two extended ei 
ments in that city. The New York Sun, in s) . 
the production, said: "It'sas fre9h and dainty as the (1 iw 
era that bloom in tbe spring. It scored an uneqi; 
bit. Pinero himself has never succeeded in writing more 
delightfully funny lines, and the play ranks as the 'smart- 
est' of the season.'' E .1. Morgan. Frank Worthing, 
William Courtenay, Frank E. Lamb, Charles Wi 
Earle Browne, E. Y. Backus, George Christie. Fred 
Estie, Harry Spear, Sadie Martinot, Mrs. Thomas 
Wbiffen and Grace Elliston are in the cast. Brother Ojli- 
crrt is to follow. 



Of the late Sir William Priestly, tbe Queen's phy- 
sician, "M. A. P." tells a new anecdote which places both 
himself and his Royal mistress in a delightful light. At 
an interesting occasion which, alas, ended fatally for the 
little royal new-comer, Sir William turned round to the 
rug where they were trying to keep life In the new-born 
grandchild of Her Majesty. He suddenly exclaimed: 
"Now, then ! You have not tried that bath yet. Look 
sharp with the hot water I " The attendant immediately 
poured out the hot water. Sir William was surprised at 
the blaze of diamonds on such little Sogers, and looking up 
at his "bath attendant," discovered it was the tender- 
hearted mother Queen herself he had rebuked. 



Comet do Orient. 

Cigarette de Luxe — 8nest Turkish tobacco. At M. Bi.askowkr 4 

Co.. 223 Montgomery St. and 1 Kearny St. , cor. Geary, San Francisco. 



The new bill at tbe Orpheum will include some of the 
best acts in the country. The Meeker-Baker trii of acro- 
batic comedians have been brought to the Coast by the 
Orpbeum Circuit Company at considerable expense. 
Kitty Mitchell is said to be one of the daintiest comedi- 
ennes ! .n the business. Jessie Padgham, a Los Angeles . 

girl, pretty and talented, and a recent debutante in California Theatre, 
vaudeville, should be popular in San Francisco. Joe J. 
Sullivan and Carrie Webber will present Blanche Mars- 
den's farcette, The Janitor. Etti Butler has been en- 
gaged for one week, and will present a number of new 
imitations of famous actresses. Miss Lillian Burkhart 
enters upon her last week. She will, by special request, 
present a number of her most successful pieces, including: 
A Pasting Fancy, A Garret Salvation, Fifty Years Ago, 
and A Deal on 'Change. 



Matthews and Bulger will exploit for the first time in 
this city at the California Theatre to-morrow night Rush 
City, the farce-comedy in which they first starred. The 
piece is said to be full of slap, dash and intelligent excite- 
ment from beginning to end. The first act takes place in 
the office of the Rush City Land Improvement Company in 
New York, where John J. Rush, played by Sherrie Mat- 
thews, is busily engaged in disposing of town lots in a town 
that does not exist, in Oklahoma. Every one of his pur- 
chasers, including Walsingbam Cholmondelly, leave with 
him on the 5 o'clock train, when the curtain falls. In 
the second act Professor Leyden Jars shows a cyclone, 
which blows the town to pieces. 

* * # 

The merry comic opera, Wang, will continue all next 
week at the Tivoli. On Monday, July 30th, the Tivoli's 
annual grand opera season will begin, and it is a foregone 
conclusion that it will be the most brilliant in the history 
of the theatre. With such great favorites as Signors 
Avedano and Salassa and Miss Anna Lichter, and with 
the many distinguished singers who make their first ap- 
pearance at the Tivoli, the management has secured a 
record company. Signora Italia Repetto, the "Italian 
Melba," comes direct from a tour of Europe. Signor 
Guiseppi Ferrari is the barytone who was heard with the 
Lambardi Company, and Tivoli audiences will hear one of 
the finest barytones when they hear this singer. Signor 
Dominico Russo is a lyric tenor of remarkable range, and 
is sure to become a great favorite. A real basso profundo 
is a rarity, but the Tivoli will present one in Signor Ales- 
sandro Nicolini. Miss Effie Stewart will be remembered 
as the dramatic soprano who sang at the Tivoli a few 
years ago. Tbe contraltos are Miss Frances Graham and 
Signorina Lia Politini. For the opening week the bill will 

be Aida and Lucia. 

* * * 

At the Alcazar next week Florence Roberts, supported 
by White Whittlesey and the Alcazar Company, will 
usher in the seventh week of Miss Roberts' engagement 
with a presentation of The Country Girl, a comedy in 
three acts by William Wycherley. This play was written 
in 1673 and produced at the Theatre Royal, in Drury 
Lane, in 1675, exactly 227 years ago. The piece was then 
known as The Country Wife. Garrick altered the piece 
considerably and changed the name to The Country Girl. 

* * * 

At Fischer's Concert House Mae Tunison, soprano, 
Daisy Bishop, a soubrette, James E. Nichols, tenor, 
Westin, "the man with a hundred faces," Violet Jobnson, 
violinist, and Deets and Don, singers and dancers, will fill 
a portion of a long and varied programme. 



For more than 6fty years the famous Jesse Moore whiskey has 
been the standard brand of tbe world. 

THE POPTJLAR HOUSE. 
Reservations by 'Phone. Main 1731 

Commenelne Sunday nitrht, July 22*1. AH week: matlneo Satur- 
day only. Matthews & Buleer, supported by Dunne & Ryley's 
all-star cast. In their original success, 

RUSH GITY 

A whirligig of fun. By Gus. Heege. author of "Ole Olson" and 

"Yon Yonson." 

July 29th: By the Sad Sea Waves. 



Grand Opera House. 



Until further notice. Every evening: at 8 o'clock sharp. 

The New FRAWLEY Gompaay 

in the tremendous spectacular sensation, 

THE GREAT RUBY 

The biggest and most successful production ever seen In San 
Francisco. Prices: 15c, 25o., 50c.,75c. MatineeB: 10c., 15c., 25c., 50o 

OlUmDia I heatre. Lessees and Managers. 

Beginning next Monday, July 23d. Six nights: matinees Wed- 
nesday and Saturday. Fifth week of the HENRY MILLER 
season. First time in this city of R. Marshall's new and original 
farcical romance, 

MIS EXCELLENCY, THE GOVERNOR 

Originally produced at the Lyceum Theatre, New York. 

July 30th: Bbother Officers. 

Thursday afternoons and Sunday nights: Bubton Holmes Lec- 

tobeb. 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mas. Ernestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Orph 



The enormous comic opera success, 

WANG 

will be played all next week. 
Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Special.— Monday, July 30th, opening of the GRAND OPERA 
SEASON. Sale of seats commences next Monday morning. 
First week— "Aida" and "Lucia." 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 centB. Telephone Bush 9. . 

San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, 
e U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Joe T. Sullivan & Carrie Webber 
Etta Butler 



Kitty Mitchell 
Jessie Padgham 

MEEKER-BAKER TRIO 

Miss Lillian Burkhart & Co. Williamson &. Stone 
Donahue and Nichols The Blograph 

Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10c; opera chairs and box setts 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 



Alcazar Theatre. 



Belasco & Th all. Managers. 

Phone, Main 254. 

Week of July 23d. Seventh week of Florence Roberts and White 
Whittlesey, in 

THE COUNTRY GIRL 



a comedy born into the world in 1673. 
Alcazar Prices— 15c, 25o., 35c, 50c. 



Only Matinee Saturday, 



Fischer's New Concert House o-Farren at. 

Beginning Monday, July 23d, E. A. Fischer, Proprietor. 

Great programme. Including Mae Tunison, Daisy Bishop, James 
E. Nlcholls, Deets & Don, and other eminent artists. 
Admission, 10 cents; reserved seats, 25 oents: matinee Sunday. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band 

wines, beers and supper. ..,.., 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show la 

over. 



and enjoy the finest 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, iqoo. 





L ibrary&abh 

China : The Long-Lived Iq view of the present awful 
Empire. events which are occurring in 

China, and the fact that for the 
time being the eyes of all the civilized peoples of the earth 
are turned to that tenth of the globe which extends from 
the edge of Siberia to the end of Cochin China, no more 
timely publication could see the light than Miss Eliza 
Ruhamah Scidmore's "China: The Long-Lived Empire.' 
It is a fact worthy of note that the book was already in 
type when the doings of the "Boxers" became the sub- 
ject of general interest, and it differs vastly from a hastily 
compiled work only prepared to meet the exigencies of 
the hour. Miss Scidmore's knowledge of an almost incom- 
prehensible country has been mainly acquired through 
seven different visits to China in twice as many years, and 
through an exhaustive and careful study of its bibliogra- 
phy. With its history, topography, literature, customs, 
philosophy, religion, and arts, she has made herself famil- 
iar, and its places and people she describes in the same 
picturesque and graphic manner which made so popular 
her former books, "Jinriksha Days in Japan" and "Java: 
The Garden of the East." Several of the eight and twenty 
chapters of the book are devoted to the capital, Peking, 
with its peculiar people. Its street scenes, its temples, 
its primitive archaic vehicles, its Manchu women in their 
gorgeous coiffures, its palaces with their great glistening 
yellow-tiled palace roofs, its walls dating from the thir- 
teenth century, its quaint military customs still the same 
as in the middle ages, are all described in a manner that 
is exceedingly entertaining. Of especial interest are those 
pages devoted to that quarter of the Tatar City where 
the different foreign legations are grouped closely to- 
gether. "Across a once splendid bridge," writes Miss 
Scidmore, "the \merican and Russian Legations face, 
and the British legation, adjoining, stretches along an in- 
fragrant canal, or open sewer, that drains away from 
lakes in the palace grounds. The British is the largest 
establishment, the five-acre compound always sheltering 
from forty to fifty British souls, or 'mouths,' in the sor- 
did Chinese expression. * * * All the official European 
residences are maintained on a scale of considerable 
splendor, and the sudden transfers from the noisome 
streets to the beautiful parks and garden compounds, 
the drawing-rooms and ball-rooms, with their brilliant 
companies living and amusing themselves exactly as in 
Europe, are among the greatest contrasts and surprises 
of Peking. * * During recent years Peking has been 
such a hot-bed of intrigue, secret conventions, and conces- 
sion-seeking, of high-handed and underhanded proceedings, 
that a diplomat's life has not been a happy one nor his 
position a sinecure. With coup d'dtals before breakfast, 
executions overnight, rioting soldiers at the railwav-sta- 
tion, mobs stoning legation carts and chairs at willj and 
telegraphic communications broken when the soldiers 
could reach the wires, the legations called for guards of 
their own marines in the autumn of 1898. Thirty or forty 
guards were sent to different European legations, but the 
Russian legation required seventy men-at-arms and Cos- 
sacks to protect it. Last to arrive were nine marines to 
defend the modest premises rented to the great Republic 
of the United States of North America, the want of ac- 
tual roof-area to shelter more guards obliging the Ameri- 
can Minister to ask that the other marines should remain 
at Tientsin, eighty miles away. By renting a Chinese 
house eighteen marines were finally quartered near the 
legation. This would have been farcical and laughable, 
humiliating to American pride only, if there had not been 
real danger and need for guards for the little community 
of foreign diplomats, shut like rats in a trap in a double- 
walled city of an estimated million three hundred thousand 
fanatic, foreign-hating Chinese, with a more hostile and 
lawless army of sixty thousand vicious Chinese soldiers 
without the walls and scattered over the country toward 
Tientsin." 



There is a chapter devoted to the Christian missions in 
Peking, the closing paragraph of which reads: "From the 
sixth to the twentieth century, Christian missionaries have 
been actively at work in China with varying fortunes, and 
any summing up of visible results give one many problems 
to consider." Another chapter deals with the Dowager 
Empress, Tsze Hsi An, "the most remarkable woman 
sovereign and the most unbridled female despot the world 
has ever known." This shrewd Manchu woman, "the 
only man in China," as she has been called, is described as 
"a tall, erect, fine-looking woman of distinguished and im- 
perious bearing, with pronounced Tartar features, the 
eye of an eagle, and the voice of determined authority and 
absolute command." Rising from the harem's ranks, un- 
educated, ignorant of public affairs, by sheer ability, by 
her own wit, will and shrewdness, she has attained su- 
preme power. She has not only made herself the abso- 
lute ruler of the Empire, but is probably responsible for 
the present uprising. 

Miss Scidmore frankly confesses that the Chinese are a 
people she cannot understand, and it is with a trenchant 
pen that she writes of their selfish conservatism, blind 
worship of precedent and antiquity, their prejudices, 
superstitions, and customs, the "ignoble queue and sense- 
less cotton shoe." "Everywhere," she says, "this fifth 
of the human race is sunk in dirt and disorder, decadent, 
degenerate, consumed with conceit, selfish, vain, cowardly 
and superstitious, without imagination, sentiment, chiv- 
alry, or sense of humor, combating with most zeal any- 
thing that would alter conditions even for the better, in- 
different as to who rules or usurps the throne." Even 
after years of residence in the ancestor kingdom of all 
the world — the long-lived, undying empire, as Miss Scid- 
more puts it — a foreigner fails to really understand them, 
for "no Occidental ever saw within or understood the 
working of the yellow brain, which starts from and arrives 
at a different point by reverse and inverse processes we 
can neither follow nor comprehend. No one knows or ever 
will really know the Chinese — the heart and soul and 
springs of thought of the most incomprehensible, unfath- 
omable, inscrutable, contradictory, logical, and illogical 
people on earth. Of all Orientals no race is so alien." 

At the Twelfth Oriental Congress held at Rome last 
year, Miss Scidmore served as one of the secretaries, and 
her position as sinologue has enabled her to throw many 
side-lights on the causes of the situation in China to-day. 
Her present work is illustrated from photographs and 
drawings, the frontispiece being a youthful portrait of the 
Dowager Empress from a painting on silk. The book will 
prove a valuable one to those who desire a closer acquain- 
tance with existing conditions at Peking, and a broader 
knowledge of the decadence of the Manchus and the 
machinery of Chinese politics. 

China: The Lone-Lived Empire: by Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore. The Cen- 
tury Co., Publishers. New York. Price, 82.50. 

A practical and convenient handbook on the subject of 
fishing and camping is on the point of publication by D. 
Appleton & Co. It is called "Familiar Fish, their Habits 
and Capture," and has an introduction by Dr. David 
Starr Jordan, President of Leland Stanford Jr. Univer- 
sity. 

The present serious disturbances in China impart a 
special interest to "China : Travels and Investigations in 
the Middle Kingdom," by General J. H. Wilson, who has 
taken so conspicuous a part of late in the administration 
of Cuban affairs. The publishers, D. Appleton & Co., have 
enhanced the value of the book by an excellent map. 

In the June number of the new periodical, "The Review 
of the Republic," Governor Roosevelt has an able article 
on "The Personal Equation in Politics." In the light of 
recent events it will be read with more than usual interest. 

A. S. Barnes & Co., New York, announce the publica- 
tion at an earlv date of a Biography of Joel Dorman 
Steele, a nineteenth century teacher and the author of 
many valuable text books. Dr. Steele was well known to 
the teaching fraternity throughout the United States, 
and not only to them will this biography be especially ac- 
ceptable, but it will doubtless find a place in professional 
and school libraries as well. m. e. n. 



July 21, 1900. 



BAN Mt.\N( ISCO imW8 M'.TTKU. 



"KcdymioD." by John Keats. "The Complete Art 
by Iua'k Walton; Piutarchs "Lives of Alexander the 
Great and Julius Ctrsar"; "The Wisdom of the An. icnts" 
and "New Atlantis," by Francis Bacon; "The School- 
master," by R^Rer Ascham; "Voyages and Travels," bj 
Sir John Maundeville, and Shakespeare's "Pericles," are 
the latest additions to the new series of Cassel '<- N.itional 
Library. Professor Henry Morley, L. L. D , is the edi- 
tor of this series so extensively used in schrols and col- 
leges for supplementary reading. These little volumes 
each contain about two hundred pages of clear, readable 
print, on good paper, at the low price of ten cents each. 
Cassell A Co., Limited, Publishers, New York. Subscrip- 
tion price per year, $5.00. Issued weekly. 

Houghton, Mifflin A Co., the Boston publishers, have, 
upon the appearance of the 200th thousand of "To Have 
and to Hold," issued a circular which is of interest, and is 
for general distribution by booksellers. It treats of the 
two historical novels written by Miss Mary Johnston, 
which proved such instant successes — " Prisoners of 
Hope," the author's first novel, published in the Fall of 
1898, and "To Have and to Hold,'' which appeared in 
February last. A brief sketch of Miss Johnstone's liter- 
ary career, her portrait, cullings from the reviews anent 
these two novels that have been in such great demand, 
an appreciative paragraph from the pen of Mr. Joel Chand- 
ler Harris, and various notes of interest make up the con- 
tents of the circular. 

Mr. H. Sutherland Edwards's "Personal Recollections," 
bearing the imprint of Messrs. Casse'l & Company, New 
York, is a notable addition to the literature of reminis- 
cence. Mr. Edwards is the dean of English musical 
critics, and has been an editor, playwright, "war special," 
and foreign correspondent. His various vocations have 
brought him into contact with many notable and interest- 
ing people. Lovers of books and music will appreciate 
Mr. Edwards's clever pen pictures to which the personal 
note gives an added charm. 

The Popular Science Monthly, which was established in 
1872 by the Appletons, and which has at present the 
largest circulation of any scientific journal in the world, 
is now being edited by Professor James McKeen Cattell 
of Columbia University, who is well known as a psycholo- 
gist and as the editor of "Science." Among other arti- 
cles contained in the July number is a timely paper by 
Dr. Haffkine, the discoverer of the preventive against the 
plague, on "Preventive Inoculation." 

Mr. Henry Kitchell Webster, whose spirited story of a 
fight for the control of a railroad, "The Short Line War," 
found many readers among those who seek the unusual in 
fiction, has written a new romance, "The Banker and the 
Bear," which deals with the thrilling changes of the stock 
market. The sub-title of the book is: "A Story of a 
Corner in Lard," and the Chicago Chamber of Commerce 
is presumably the point around which the action centers. 

In "Everybody's Magazine" for July, Mr. Stuart Rob- 
son, one of the very oldest actors in point of service be- 
fore the public, his stage career extending as it does, over 
nearly half a century, has the first of a series of articles, 
in the nature of an autobiography, entitled "The Memor- 
ies of Fifty Years." 

The handsome edition in colors of Mr. Frank W. Chap- 
man's invaluable "Bird- Life," is illustrated by Mr. Ernest 
Seton-Thompson. 

Books Received. 

Lothrop Publishing Co. : "With Lawton and Roberta," by El- 
bridge S. Brooks, price $1.25; "The Noank's Log," by W. O. Stod- 
dard, price 11.25; "Concerning Cats," by Helen M. Winslow, 
price $1.50. 

Harper & Bros. : "Lady Blanche's Salon," by Lloyd Bryce, price 
$1.25; "Overland to China," by Archibald R. Colquhoun, price $3.00. 

Macmillan Company : "The Banker and the Bear," by Henry K. 
Webster, price $1.50. M. E. B. 

" Tsis beats Paris I" exclaimed a globe-trotter the other night 
when for the first time he was entertained at the Cafe Zinkand.' 
After the play is over everybody goes to Zinkand's to get the best of 
wines, beers and sappers and to listen to the inimitable music. 



New Map of 

California 

FREE 

A new map of the State of California, 
right up to date, will be given free to any 
applicant either by mail or in person. 
Address 

SANTA FE OFFICE, 

628 Market Street, S. F. 



educational. 



College San Rafael 



For Voung Ladies 



Term begins August 6th. 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Doinlnlo, 
Pull colleeic course of studies. A boarding school of hlcliest 
grade. Superb modern building:. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal. 



Irving Institute. 



Boarding and day school for young ladies, 
2126 California street, will reopen AUGUST 
6, 1900. Accredited to the Universities ; pri- 
mary department for children ; carriage will 

call. 

Rev. Edward B. Church, A. M., Principal 



mm 



Business College 

24 Post street, San Francisco. 



Bookkeeping, business practice, 
shorthand, typing, languages, telegraphy, English 
branches, electrical, civil and mining engineering, assaying, blow pipe, geol- 
ogy, mineraloey, surveying, mechanical drawing, etc.; 25 teachers; individ- 
ual instruction ; 200 graduates annually in positions ; students can enter any 
time. New eighty-page catalogue free. 



Mills College and Seminary. 

Grants diplomas and Confers degrees; seminary course ac- 
credited to the Universities; rare opportunities offered in 
music, art and elocution. Thirty - fifth year ; fall term 
opens AUGUST 8, 1900. Write for catalogue to 
Mrs. C. T. Mills, President, Mills Oolleee P. O., Cal. 



10 



BAN FKANC1SCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 21, 1900. 




OLAA WATER HEAD No. 2. Flow, 4.250.0C0 Gallons Per 24 Hours. Elevation Above Sea, 2,000 Feet. 




OLAA WATER HEAD No. 3. Flow, 2,800,000 Gallons Per 24 Hours. Elevation Above Sea, 1 650 Feet. 



July it, 1900 BANFF » NEWS LETTER. ,, 

NEW SUGAR. INVESTMENTS IN E6e SANDWICH ISLANDS. 



AN investment that is appealicg tremendously to the 
investors of California is that of the Olaa Sugar Com- 
pany, Limited, of the Sandwich Islands. The first an- 
nouncements have already made a sensation in financial 
circles. Fortunes galore have been made in Hawaiian 
sugar, and now that the Islands are a territory of the 
United States and no complications can arise to question 
the safety of capital invested there, the knowing ones are 
rushine in with their surplus wealth. 

On the island of Hawaii the climate knows no extremes, 
as on the cultivable lands a meteorological record kept 
for twelve years shows the highest temperature to have 
been 89 degrees and the lowest 54 degrees, or a mean 
temperature for the year of 71.5 degrees, so that the cli- 
mate is all that could be desired for the cultivation of the 
cane. There are thousands of acres lying idle, but with 
the introduction of additional capital, which is the main 
thing needed there, investors who go into a bona fiile ven- 
ture in the early stages of the country as United States 
territory should reap a good return. There are about 
thirty sugar plantations on the island of Hawaii, and it is 
proposed to augment the number with a portion of the 
capital from San Francisco, or from investors in the 
United States, so that about 35,000 acres of the best soil 
may be cultivated for the production of sugar cane. No 
irrigation is required to insure crops, as the annual pre- 
cipitation is over 100 ioches. The promoters of the Hilo 
Railroad Company, which include responsible men such as 
L. A. Thurston, A. W. Carter, M. P. Robinson, B. F. 
Dillingham, and others well known in the commercial 
world for integrity and ability, acquired the control by 
purchase and long leases of about 35,000 acres of the 
richest sugar lands on the island of Hawaii. These lands 
are situated in the districts of Olaa and Puna, in a south- 
easterly direction from Hilo, the port of entry for the 
island, and which promises to be a lively rival of Honolulu. 
Two sugar plantations have been organized and incor- 
porated under the laws of the Republic of Hawaii, taking 
over those valuable lands under the names of Olaa Sugar 
Company, Limited, and Puna Sugar Company, Limited. 
A standard gauge road (four feet eight and a half inches), 
with sixty-pound steel rails, has been constructed and 
equipped with Baldwin locomotives and cars manufactured 
at the shops of the Hilo Railroad Company. The Olaa 
Sugar Company, capitalized at $5,000,000, divided into 
250,000 shares of a par value of $20 each, was the first 
sugar plantation started on the line of the Hilo railroad. 
The property of this Company is situated in the Dis- 
trict of Olaa, Island of Hawaii. The land is an oblong 
strip about four miles wide and fifteen miles long. Its 
northeastern extremity, where the mill is in course of 
construction, is about nine miles from Hilo, the principal 
seaport, and lies at an elevation of about 200 feet above 
sea level, rising gently to an elevation of 2,000 feet in 
fifteen miles. 

The Company was organized and incorporated under 
the laws of the Republic of Hawaii in 1899. 

Manager F. B. McStocker assumed the duties of 
Manager, and commenced work at the plantation July 1st 
1899. It is doubtful if any plantation ever started in that 
country could at the end of twelve months show better or 
even as good results for the time employed and money ex- 
pended. A careful perusal of the Manager's report for 
the first six months ending December 31, 1899, shows the 
enormous amount of work performed to that date, and a 
detailed account of the money expended. The work dur- 
ing the following six months to July 1, 1900 gives assur- 
ance that the management may reasonably expect the 
maiden crop of this Company to fully equal the most 
sanguine expectations, (4,500 acres of well matured cane.) 
At that date the Company had cleared of grass, brush. 
trees, surface stone ready for 

Plowing 5.500 acres 

Plowed arid harrowed once 4,500 

Plowed and harrowed twice 3,000 

Planted in. cahe i. 500 ' 

The work of clearing and preparing the land for a crop 



of 5.000 to 6,000 acres to be planted for the second crop 
for 1903 is also progressing. 

Buildings to accommodate twelve hundred laborers, 
and stables for four hundred mules have been erected. 
Blacksmith, carpenter and repair shops have been com- 
pleted and fully equipped; fences built enclosing nine 
thousand acres for the production of the first two crops; 
reservoirs constructed with capacity for 9,600,000 gallons 
of water; flowing water developed supplying 16,000,000 to 
20,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. The total available flow 
of water now in sight at water beads is about 16,000,000 
gallons per twenty-four hours. More than one-half of this 
has been developed by tunneling into underground streams 
yet to be developed, which from surface indications will 
give an additional flow of several million gallons. 

FINANCIAL. 

This company has purchased for land in fee.. 14. 372 acres 

Land under lease 40 years 4,600 " 

Land controlled under 5,000 " 



40 years option, say 23,872 " 



$2,500,000 



Total Issue of Stock , $5,000,000 

Received from sale fully paid-up stock as per 

page4 Annual Report , . $2,146,580 

To be received on delivery in exchange for 

deeds of land 353,420 

Received 65 per cent on 1,250,000 assessable 

stock 812,500 

Balance assessments to be called 35 per cent 

on $1,250,000 437.500 

Stockin Treasury 1,250.000 

$5,000,000 

The company now proposes to issue $1,250,000 first mort- 
gage 6 per cent 5-20 year gold coupon bonds to be secured by 
a trust deed to cover all present and prospective property, 
giving all investors the privilege of exchanging bonds for 
stock in treasury at par any time on or before January 
1, 1902. During that year it is expected a dividend of 10 
per cent to 15 oer cent will be declared upon the capital 
stock of the company. 

assets and liabilities july 1, 1900. 
Assets— 

Real Estate.— Sugar Land in fee. lease hold and option — $2,500,000 
All improvements to July 1st, including $208,000 on ac- . 

count mill 1,311.912 



Liabilities — 
125,000 shares 



$3,811,912 



Fully paid op stock $2,146,580 . 

Fully paid up stock due for 
> land held under option. . 353.420 

$2,500,000 

62,500 shares assessable stock, $1,250,000, 65 per cent paid. . 812,500 

Cash advances 395.412 

Payments due July 1st 104,000 499,412 

$3,811,912 

estimated capital, receipts and expenditure, july 1, 1900. 
Receipts— 

From sale 125,000 shares paid up stock. $2,600,000 

" " assessable stock 812.500 

Amount to be collected on assessable stock 487. BOO 

Proposed amount to be collected from sale of bonds 1,250,000 

$5,000,000 
Expenditure (For Capital Account) — 

For land $2,500,000 

For improvements to July 1, 1900 1,311,912 

For other improvements and growing crops. 
clearing land, etc., to Jan. 1, 1902, estimated : 

July 1 to Jan. 1, 1901 395.500 

Jan. 1 to July 1. 1901 355.500 

July 1 to Jan. 1, 1902 385,500 

1,136,500 

Estimated balance cash on hand Jan. 1, 1902. . . 61,588 

$5,000,000 

The crop for 1902 is estimated to be not less than 4,500 
acres. To yield not less than 25.000 tons. To sell for not 
less than $70 per ton, which is $20 below present price. 
Upon this basis the crot> will bring to the company $1,750,- 
000. Deduct from this cost of production, bagging, and 
marketing, say $40 per ton ($1,000,000), leaves a net profit 
of 15 per cent on $5,000,000, or $750,000. 



I 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1900. 



. ■ 



££$!£ 



LiOokorOh 




THE Bamboos have taken to water. Let me tell you 
how it happened. Gelett Burgess occasioned their 
downfall. This little social and outing crowd, whose busi- 
ness is entirely pleasure, is, as you know, composed of some 
twenty-five Bohemian Clubmen. They give formal dinners 
at the club, but they are frequently entertained at the 
country residences of such Bamboos as are fortunate 
enough to possess them. Dr. Russell Cool, who has a 
beautiful place a few miles out of Los Gatos, gave the 
Bamboos a Saturday-to-Monday last week, and those who 
were not in Paris or otherwise engaged were on hand. 
Two new members were to be finally initiated : Mr. 
Burgess, of the "purple cow," who is at present elevating 
journalism in San Francisco, and Harry Melvin, the bari- 
tone lawyer of Oakland. Among the many attractions of 
Dr. Cool's country place is a swimming tank made of brick 
and cement, eighty-five feet in length and half as long, 
and usually filled with water to the depth of sixteen feet. 
The dinner on Saturday night lasted until after eleven; 
and just at the hour of twelve Mr. Burgess and Mr. Mel- 
vin were led to the tank by their new-found brothers. 
Mr. Tharp was Master of Ceremonies, the Bamboos lining 
up along the brink. Tharp stood between Burgess and 
Melvin. 

"New Bamboos," said he, "Do you follow the leader?" 

"We do," they responded. 

"Here goes," said Tharp, and with that he plunged 
into the pool; and Burgess and then Melvin followed. 
They had everything on, including their hats. 

"I would like to get out of this," said Burgess, after 
splashing around a while, and he lifted up a wet arm to 
Ned Beck. 

"I'll give you a lift," said Beck; and Burgess pulled 
Beck in; and that was the signal for a general dip, every- 
body plunjed everybody else. About twenty of the 
wettest-looking figures that ever watered a garden 
crawled back to the house to get pajamas or blankets, or 
any kind of covering, while their clothes were hung out to 
dry. There were a few hot Scotches, too, on the pro- 
gramme. 

"It isn't funny now," said Burgess, shivering over bis 
Scotch, "but fifteen years from now we will laugh like the 
devil." 

The only dry man in the company was Joullin — a 
specialty of his. He cannot swim, and that fact and his 
size conspired to keep the boys from sharing him in the 

general duck. 

* * * 

Donnybrook fair never was a marker as a place of ex- 
citement to the Oakland Club. This organization is one 
of the most exclusive female organizations on the coast. 
In it are the leaders of all the factions that go to make up 
the social hash that marks the swell set of the city of 
schools, churches, scandals and perfect men. Mrs. Watt 
is one of the leading lights of the club. Mrs. Bunnell is 
the president. There is a breach between these two ad- 
vocates of the elevation of woman. The gossips say that 
personal jealousy is at the root of the row. 

Mrs. Watt is at the head of the Domestic Science De- 
partment of the club. This annex is for the teaching of 
how to be happy though married. The women are taught 
to reach their husbands' hearts and pocket books via the 
stomach route. "Peed a man well and you've got him" is 
the motto which hangs over their mantelpiece. In order 
to more widely disseminate these views and methods, the 
club published a magazine under the editorship of Mrs. 
Watt. This excursion into the deadly fields of journalism 
was the reef on which the ambitions of Mrs. Watt were 
wrecked. 

Not being a woman of business she failed to keep a de- 
tailed account of the returns and expenditures of her job. 
In consequence there was a series of remarks by the 



other ladies which hurt the feelings of Mrs. Watt. This 
phase of the row came to a climax when Miss Jackson, 
who was hired to teach the ladies sewing said that Mrs. 
Watt was holding out $35 of the money coming to her. 
Mrs. Watt was sure there was some mistake. Miss Jack- 
son was sure she was right. After an oratorical battle 
Mrs. Watt made good the $35 and seven ladies of the club 
sent her a round robin asking her to get out of the 
editorial chair of the magazine. She got out. With her 
went the advertising she had solicited. And now the club 
is rent with factions which promise to wreck it. Mrs. 
Bunnell is charged with having started the Oakland Club 
to break up the Ebel'. and advance herself socially. This 
she indignantly denies as she points to the fact that she is 
still an Ebellite. Incidentally Miss Jackson has started an 
opposition sewing class to the one fostered by Mrs. Watt 
and is rapidly taking away the pupils gathered by the 
ex-editor. 

And there you are. Mrs. Olney is now coming forward 
as the most prominent woman in the club and the conser- 
vative members are wondering why they joined the organ- 
ization. The Oakland Club was organized for the purpose 
of elevating. Thus far it has simply acted as a leveller 
and a josh topic of news for the sensational dailies. 

* * * 

Epicures who are looking for something new will be 
pleased to learn that a caterer of this city has discovered 
it, and that it has been approved by that Kytkaof gastro- 
nomical experts, Col. Sam Beaver. Accepting the Boni 
face's invitation, the Colonel arrived at the restaurant with 
an appetite sharpened by about seven hours' fasting and as 
many vermouth cocktails, and the company of a true and 
tried friend whom he is teaching "how to live." The 
piece de resistance proved to have the shape and character- 
istics of a wild goose, excepting that the. meat was a 
creamy white in color. The host offered a premium to 
any one who would give a name to the bird or animal that 
had furnished the feast, but the epicure, whose experience 
in diet ranges from reed birds to whale blubber, had finally 
to give it up. "Nevermind, Colonel," said the caterer, 
" the woods are full of them or soon will be. Sir, you have 
been eating the production of a Belgian hare crossed upon 
a domestic duck." 

Then Sam awoke. 

* * # 

"Who sold Jake Rauer a gold brick?" That is the ques- 
tion the boy on the street is asking. There was a time 
when if Jake Rauer's well-known buggy drew up in front 
of a house the whole population of the neighborhood 
watched the proceedings with interest and sympathy. It 
was the same sort of interest which inspires the urban 
dog to bark at the pound wagon. But the bill collector is 
no longer a thing of terror, but rather for derision, and 
the other day when he came out of doors after one of his 
visits he found that the boys on the block had filled his 
buggy full of bricks — not the brick of commerce, but the 
brick of industry. In the meantime Mr. Rauer is so be- 
wildered that he does not know whether to put his hat on 

his head or his hod. 

* * # 

Captain Freese, ex-Public Administrator, is seventy- 
three years of age, and recently his wife presented him 
with a fine bouncing boy baby. At the table the other 
day, some women friends of the family were discussing the 
incident, and all agreed that it was a fine baby. "It 
ought to be," interjected Mr. Grow, who had been listen- 
ing; "it's the work of an old master." 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 

Camping locations, hotels, mineral springs, and resorts for all peo- 
ple at all prices, may be found along the line of tbe California North- 
western railway. The season is just right for a cool rest and recu- 
peration. 

The human skin is sensitive; bad cosmetics scar it. Camelline 
not only beautifies but soothes. It is used by Adelina Patti, Ellen 
Terry and Mrs. Kendall and thousands of others. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 
746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Yode sideboard at home is incomplete if it is not stocked with 
Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey. 



July ii, 1900. SAN FRAN \RW9 LETTER 

What Happened to Myself 

at the Chutes French Ball 



«3 



Br REGINALD 8CMUYLER. 

WELL. I did the reckless thing a week ago to-night of 
going out to the Chutes to the French ball. Thoy 
called it a celebration of the Kail of the Bastile and all 
sorts of high sounding names, but it was a French ball just 
the same, and there were lively things doing. 

I arrived in company with a lot of fellows from the club 
a little after the hour of 12. The speech making and the 
fireworks were all over and everybody was giving himself 
and herself up to a reckless good time. The first female 
acquaintance I saw was a young woman whose name fre- 
quently appears in the "among those present" lists of the 
society columns of the News Letter. She is a valiant 
equestrienne, and I caught her in the act of striding a 
wooden charger in the merry-go-round. She rode with 
rare daredevilment, showing a brace of stockings that made 
my waistcoat look Hue a funeral badge. She wore a golf 
skirt, reasonably short, and a black veil that had perhaps 
sheltered her countenance earlier in the night was lifted 
to the full and puckered about her brow. A lemon-headed 
youth, something the worse for good wine or bad whiskey, 
sat the steed next to her. They yelled at me, at every- 
body in the crowd, to come and join the whirl, but we 
skulked away to the big auditorium, where the central 
chairs had been removed and a fairly decent dancing pa- 
vilion improvised. 

In a minute I found myself in the waltzful arms of a wide 
blonde, who told me her real name and address while we 
danced. I released myself at the price of a glass of beer 
at a neighboring bar just in time to get out into the open 
and witness a fight between two young gentlemen of the 
tropical side of Market street who had had the misfortune 
to central their affections on one girl. They had little 
science but much strength, and made several seconds of 
good sport. Then one went down to stay until the police 
officer lifted him. And as they carried him out to the 
patrol wagon the girl went with him. It is not always 
the victorious that wins the girl at a French ball. 

Then the Chutes. What's the use of going to the 
Chutes unless you shoot them? Up to the top we went in 
a gaily electric lighted car; and I, with my usual fortune, 
found a seat in the sliding vehicle of torture beside a lady 
of many pasts. Her chemical hair had lost its pins and 
fluttered in the wind like a yellow scarf; her eyes were as 
red as her rouge. She had been going the pace that fills. 
Down the slide we shot, and as we struck the hard water 
her hat, a huge feathery affair, went overboard. Again 
my luck; I had to fish it out, and nearly lost life and 
health in doing so. But strong hands reached to pull me 
back, and like a hero I presented my seatmate with her 
hat. 

"It's soaked," said she. 

'•So am I," said I. 

"Me too," said she. "Let's get out of this and have 
something." 

"Not for me," said I. "Nothing but water, and I've 
got an overdose." 

"You're a fly actor," said the lady, as I helped her out 
and to the shore. She was looking at my Tuxedo. 

"And you're an actress," said I, with equal wit and 
wisdom; "I know I've seen that hair somewhere before." 

"At the Olympia," she said. "Come around some night 
when your show's out, and we'll crack a bottle. Got a 
card?" 

I lied and escaped. 

Alone in a crowd to crush a Sandow I found myself. 
Drunks all around me and not a drop to drink. It was as 
much as one's life was worth to trek to the bar, and 
worse than that if one drank what they sold. My arms 
were wet to the elbows; my shirt front was a study in 
black and while. Buttoning up my Raglan, I ducked and 
dodged for the exit, passed the carriage and walked a 
block for the electric car, which was running all night. 
My man, a fairly faithful fellow, was waiting. 

"Thompkins," I said, "I've been to the Chutes ball. Help 
me off with these things and dig up a suit of pajamas, and 
arrange a hot Scotch." 



"Will you rise early, sir?" 
"Not on your life." 

"Then, sir, if vou don't mind, I shall go out and take a 
look myself," said Thomokins. 



A NOTABLE death of last week, and a distinct loss to 
the bar of California, was that of Ernest Graves, 
who died at his home in San Luis Obispo. A man of re- 
markable power as an attorney, and of unbounded gener- 
osity and kindliness, he leaves, as his father did before 
him, a memory that will not be soon forgot. 

Under the new management of John F. Heinkelthe Maison Riche 
19 prospering handsomely and the good livers know where to go (or 
a finely cooked and perfectly served meal, such as one gets in the 
best restaurants of Paris. The wines are the best brands in the 
world's market and the excellent viands and service together with 
the moderate prices conspire to make this restaurant one of the 
best in America. 




The summer is not over; it has only commenced, in fact; and 
now is the time to get to the cool fresh country. There are hun- 
dreds of places on the line of the California Northwestern Kailway. 



_ . Modern^ >2> 

NOB HILL FLAT 

1011 CALIFORNIA ST., Near Mason, 

Opposite Flood Mansion. 

11 rooms, 2 bath rooms, large laundry, coal 
bunkers, inlaid floors in drawing room, un- 
surpassed view north and south. Four min- 
utes' ride from Kearny street, six minutes 
from Market street. Rent, $100. Will lease 
to responsible parties. Apply to 

G. A. BERTON, 323 Montgomery St. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 

The Continental Building: and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the nix months ending Juno 30, 1900, a dividend of 12 per cent, per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, 6 per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Cait. Oliver Eldridge, President. William Corbin, Secretary. 

Oflicc : 222 Sansome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending: June 30, 1900, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, July 2. 1900. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office: 33Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society. 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending; June 
30, 1000, at the rate of three and one-quarter (3%) per cent per annum on all 
Deposits, free of taxes, and payable on and after July 2,1900. Dividends 
not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after July 1, 1900. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 

Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Franoisco. Cal 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

At a regular meeting: of the Board of Directors, held on July 3, 1900, the 
regular quarterly dividend of 81.50 per share, being No. 66. was declared, 
payable on and after July 16, 1900. E. E, SHOTWEIX, Secretary. 



Bethesda 



to swim in. 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 

— Da. Shbady, 27-t Lexington avenue, New York 

L CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquet- Dealers, 

Send tor Pamphlet, 41 8 Saoramento Street. 



Blake. Moffit & Towne 



Blake, Moffit & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Or. 



Telephone Main 199 

Dealers in PAPER 

65-57-59-61 First street, S. P. 



Worthington Ames 

nember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Buildine. 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 



M 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, igoo. 



Financial jtn 




The war in China, deplorable in many res- 

The Local pects, will be of enormous commercial and 

Stock Market, financial benefit to the Pacific Coast. The 

army that will be required to make the 
campaign in China will be fed chiefly by Pacific Coast 
ports. Our own Government is buying largely the supplies 
in this market. In the matter of ships, many vessels will 
be chartered on this Coast, and these charters to the 
Government, being more or less of the emergency char- 
acter, are exceedingly profitable. Companies like the 
Pacific Mail and probably the Oceanic, with headquarters 
at this port, will be greatly benefited by this trade. This 
unexpected demand for much of our products will un- 
doubtedly advance prices and inure to the benefit of the 
producers of this State. The war in the Philippines 
helped trade in this port immensely. The best contracts 
ever placed in this market were given for supplies for our 
soldiers engaged in operations in that quarter. It is 
difficult to estimate the amount of benefit, from a com- 
mercial standpoint, which this war will bring to our mer- 
chants, but we know enough from past experience to 
justify the opinion that it will be very great. In the local 
financial market there is nothing to report except that 
there is a firmer feeling in all shares and bonds. The 
water stock is held with greater confidence. The lighting 
stocks have also improved in price. The Independent 
Lighting Company will soon be in the market, furnishing 
light and power, but as this company does not provide 
gas it will not come into competition with this important 
branch of the business of the San Francisco Gas & Electric 
Company. The advancing price of raw sugar improves 
the prospects of the Hawaiian plantations where stocks 
are listed on this market. Consequently, there is a better 
feeling in regard to this line of investments. There is a 
strong demand for approved bonds. At the present time 
the supply of this class of securities is scarce and offerings 
are eagerly taken up. 

T. J. Clavering, the well-known mining 
Bullion from man, has just returned from a visit to the 
Lincoln Mine. Lincoln mine at Sutter Creek, Amador 
County, in which he is largely interested. 
The first clean-up was made when he was there of a crush- 
ing of 1100 tons of ore at the South Spring Hill mine in 
Amador City. The ore yielded in free gold 182.69 ounces, 
valued at $17 an ounce, which makes $3105.73. There 
were 39 tons of sulphurets, the assay value of which was 
$77.51 per ton, or a total of $3023.89. Then there was 
the average loss in the tailings of 58 cents per ton for the 
1100 tons, or a total of $583. This brings the total value 
of the rock milled up to $6711.62, or an average value per 
ton of $6.10. This, a mining contemporary says, may be 
considered good rock, since the Lincoln carries a big 
ledge and is eligibly located for working. The number of 
tons milled was sufficient to make the test a thorough one. 
The rock was taken from one drift on the 500-foot level, 
and Mr. E. C. Voorhies, Superintendent of the mine, is 
now cross-cutting on the 1200 level, and cutting a station 
preparatory to cross-cutting at the 650 level to strike the 
same body of ore lower down. 

The Magalia and Golden Gate direc- 
River Bonanzas on tors have had another reconstruction 
the Carpet Again, scheme on hand which, according to 

latest accounts, has not turned out ex- 
actly satisfactory for them. Richard Lonsdale, a share- 
holder who seems to have had some common sense knocked 
into him by his past experience with these companies, has 
been "talking back," a rare instance of independence 
upon the part of the lambkins on that side of the water, 
who are generally supposed to walk quietly up to be 
fleeced, and his protest seems to be based on strong enough 
grounds to upset any scheme for reconstruction dealing 
with the present proposition alone without holding a post- 



mortem which would necessitate the recapitulation of un- 
savory ancient history. In a letter to the press on the 
subject of the Magalia Mr. Lonsdale complains that "this 
company and the Golden Gate have been reconstructed 
more than once, the liquidator in each case being the sec- 
retary of the companies, and therefore not an independent 
man. At the subsequent meeting of the Golden Gate a 
director, upon being pressed as to the standing of the 
Tarnagulla Company, with whom they propose to amalga- 
mate, admitted that unless the scheme were carried 
through the latter would have to reconstruct. The direc- 
tors of the Golden Gate and Magalia are practically the 
same, and draw fees from each. No work appears by the 
report to have been done on the Golden Gate, but there is 
an amount of £2,879 9s. 8d. set down as expenditure in 
London for office expenses, directors' fees, traveling and 
other charges." It may be added that at a meeting held 
on the 28th ult. in London a resolution for reconstruction 
of the Magalia Company was lost on a show of hands. 

Bar silver has sold higher recently than it 

Silver is has for a number of years past. So far 62 

Looming Up. cents has been the highest point reached in 

this country, but it is apt to advance before 
the present difficulty with China is settled. If troops are 
to be mobilized in that country on an extensive scale, which 
is likely from the way matters are developing, silver will 
be in demand, as it is the chief medium of exchange over 
there, and already both Germany and Russia are in the 
market buying large amounts of the metal. This de- 
mand will go a long way in reducing the reserves in this 
country and help the Western silver miners out of the hole 
in which they have been cornered for years. While the 
price of silver is fixed in London, the market supply in 
this country is controlled by the American Smelting and Re- 
fining Company, the United Metals Selling Company con- 
trolling the sale of silver for export and home supply. 
Politics will have little effect on the silver market so long 
as a state of war reigns in the Celestial Empire. 

One of the attractive investment propo- 
The Bachelor's sitions for oil investors just now is the 
Oil Company, stock of the Bachelor's Oil Company, 
which owns some valuable property in 
three of the recognized oil producing regions of the State 
on Poso Creek, Kern River and Sunset Districts. The 
capital of this company is $200,000 in 200,000 shares of $1 
each, and under its by-laws no indebtedness can be con- 
tracted in excess of 5 per cent, of its capital stock, with 
no salaries to pay its officers, the secretary and superin- 
tendent being stockholders, who give their services free 
until the business is on a paying basis. The holding on 
Poso Creek consists of 640 acres in section 8, township 
27 S. range 28 E., M. D. B. & M., the deed to which is held 
by the company. On this tract, where sinking is com- 
paratively inexpensive and the cost of prospecting so 
small that it is known as the "poor man's district," there 
is room to sink from 100 to 200 wells without one well 
drawing from another. In the Sunset District, the latest 
valuable acquisition of territory by the Bachelor's Com- 
pany, a prospect well sunk to determine the value of the 
ground struck a stream of oil sand at a depth of 57 feet. 
Located close to this ground is well No. 17 of Jewett & 
Blodgett, which is considered one of their best, is now 
flowing, although only drilled as yet into the first sands. 
Besides these valuable and promising lands, the company 
has since acquired additional territory, total aggregating 
1,460 acres in four different localities. The officers and 
directors are: S. P. Barstow, President; W. L. Pixley, 
First Vice-President; Tyree A. Bell, Second Vice-Presi- 
dent; Ambrose Harris, Secretary; H. L. Gear, Attorney; 
C. A. Harmon, Dr. E. C. Zimerman, J. E. Bliss, C. W. 
Elfving and C. J. Tallon, Directors. The Germania Trust 
Company is Treasurer. The work underway at present 
includes two wells on land in Poso District and one in Sun- 
set. The large acreage of land itself guarantees an im- 
mense profit for shareholders, if simply held for an ad- 
vance in price. 

If yod have never tasted Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey, try it and 
be convinced that it is the best whiskey in the world. 

July and August are favorite vacation month9. Along the line of 
the California Northwestern Railway you will find ever no many 
lovely spots to rest and enjoy idleness and pleasure. 



July 2i, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBWS LETTT-R 



FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stork and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning July l.lih and 
ending July l'.Hb. 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS 
OntnCnutV uxm 9 im OcMiti<- H 

Lo* AntU Hr 9S._ LOJ) ^ 10S Pari. A 

Market .*». 1st Con» 8 P '. - 

Hot RtoIOUSV 1000 9 117'-, 117 , sv » u 
a 1.000^11.1 svm 

Oakland Om ■ - MM SHIS 

VVOUU 



Watkh. Sh»rrv 


HVl 


Contra Co*ta Wikr.. 690 
Serine Vallcr Water. IK) 


sM 


«*p asd Kumrrmn'. 
Equiuthin Oaa- 

Mutual Electric 20 

Pacific Oh Inip'r'nt- 210 


4 

10>i 

ft 

90 


PowDiat. 

OlanL. -... l>«i 

Vltorll. loo 


MM 

3 


Ba*k.. 

Bank of California-... 20 

California Safe Depst 10 


410 

101H 



L>t Scoar Stock*. Snares. 

67 liana I' Co 1"' 

9t?i Honakaa 

Hutchinson 90 

3 V Kllauca 15 

■SgMakawcli «ft 

J, * Paauhau 9 PI Co 



M 



STKCKT RaILBOADS. 

MarkctiStrcot tr» 

Mist F.M.AXEOUS. 

Alaska Packers 15 

Oil Fmlt Cnnners-... 5 

OceanioSSCo 70 

Pmilie Coast Borax... to 



ICt 

;;•> 

31'! 

us 

99 

93H 
190 

223 



I -.t 



MM 

.11 



'.'2', 
225 



l"l v 2 Firemans Fund. 

The transactions for the week amount to 4,848 shares and xO.000 
bonds, against .vW-t shares and 63,500 bonds for the week previous. 

Of the sngar stocks. Paauhau, Makaweli, and Honokaa were quite 
freely traded id. aod when the consolidation of several of these com- 
panies takes place in the fall, prices may show some improvement. 

Spring Valley remains firm at 95; Contra Costa is strong at 673.. 
The company's suit will come up in September. Powder stocks are 
quiet, with little trading, this being the dull season. Trading in 
bonds has been heavier than during last week. 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 



Golden Gate Beet Sugar 


Bid. 
500 


Askec 

100 m 

25 0< 
22 5( 
OIL S 
1 00 
50 
65 

IlNtNG 

4 00 

1 25 

23 

35 

12M 

40 

kbove s 

Topli 

ico. Re 

.HOE 


> Sanitary Reduction 

Nev. Co. Narrow Gaug< 


Bid. 

14 50 

1 00 


Asked 
1 25 














B 
1 05 

linir 

PH B. 
dccha 

-. 17 


TOCKS. 




09% 




95 














Stocks. 




23 








2 50 








10 


15 




me)... 
icoi... 
r or se 

Jose 

' Oil E 

LAKE 




50 








30 






80 
1) pro 

eet. 




Orders for buyint 
attended to by 

Member Producers 


toeks (listed and unliste 

TZ, Stock Broker, 

oms 9 and 10, 330 Pine str 

EXCURSIONS. 


luptly 



First of the Season Saturday for Ten Dollars. 

LAKE TAHOE excursion travel is receiving unusual 
impetus this season in the way of reduced rates. In 
addition to the regular season ticket of $16.50, the South- 
ern Pacific has just fixed upon a ten-daj rate from San 
Francisco, Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley of $13.30, 
which affords the usual rail transportation to the lake, 
steamer trip around the lake, and certain stop-over 
privileges at the resorts. 

A Saturday-Monday excursion has also been arranged 
for this Saturday, on the train leaving San Francisco at 
6 p. m., the cost of ticket to be only $10, sleeping-car 
berth included. The return trip, however, must be on 
the train reaching this city about noon on the following 
Monday. All day Sunday may be spend on and around 
the lake. 

Lake Tahoe is regarded as a world attraction quite in- 
dependent of the circumstance of rates, but with the cost 
of transportation cut down to such amazingly low figures 
it would seem that everybody might go and enjoy its 
grandeurs. 

The Highest Standard 
Of excellence is demanded from the beginning to the end of the 
production of the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk— a sys- 
lem maintained for forty years. Never buy unknown brands. 

Artistic Hardwood Grilles 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams Build- 
ing, N .E. corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 

The California Northwestern Railway, the picturesque route of 
California, will run an excursion to TJkiah, Sunday, July 22d. Each 
ticket sold insures a seat, as the company will not sell any more 
tickets than the number of seats provided. 

The whiskey that touches the right spot every time is Jesse 
Moore ; to be had from all first-class dealers. 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 

The Organizers of the 

OPHIR OIL CO., 

Have arranged with the CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST COMPANY to hold sufficient securities in trust for the 
purchasers of Ophir Oil Stock to INSURE HOLDERS OF THIS 
STOCK AGAINST LOSS. 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Company shall fail to produce oil 
in paying quantities sufficient to bring its stock to par value (one 
dollar per share), purchasers will receive back, with accrued interest 
THE ENTIRE AMOUNT PAID IN BY THEM FOR STOCK. 

The securities thus held in trust are adequate, and an investment 
in Ophir Oil Stock is as secure as a United States Government bond, 
and vastly superior to deposits in Banks of Savings, for the reason 
that it combines 

Absolute Security with 
immense possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "reading between the lines" in this 
proposition. Whatever happens to the Ophir Oil Company your 
investment is safe. You cannot lose. Only a limited amount of 
this SECURED STOCK is offered for sale. While it lasts it can be 



had for 



75c. per Share 

Fully paid and non-assessable. Sold only in blocks of $600 and tip- 
ward. Common stock, unsecured, can be had at FIFTY CENTS 
per share in certificates of twenty shares and over. 

OPHIR OUTCOMPANY. 

Room 14, Fifth Floor, Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 
Represenled in San Francisco by J. P. MASSIE. 

Automobiles to the front 

The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 

The lightest, strongest cheapest and most durable. It climbs the Bteepes 
{Trades and is practicable on all kinds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants 

There la an active demand for the company's stock. 
There is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining 
A limited amount of stock Is offered at One Dollar per share. Par value $10 
Full Information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 



826 Parrott Buildlntr, San Francisco, Cal. 



S. GU0DEN0UGH, Secretary. 



Western Mutual Investment Go. ™-™«"™* 

$2 Per Month 
415-416 Safe Depoelt Building. Montgomery and California streets. San 
Francisco. Aeentn \VanteH 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Cbookkr Buildtho, San Francisco. Cal 



i6 



15he 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. July 21, 1900. 

OLD CHINA: ITS STORY. 



It has been well said that no great nation in the world is so nearly a terra incognita as China. Its history, its literature, its art 
(except the scraps of it we pick up in so-called Chinese stories tlial keep a special tine of goods for the white man's trade) are almost 
unknown to the Western world, fhe war between China and Japan is fresh in our minds, and the modern newspaper correspondent 
made us understand its external side at least. The following brief history of the older China is compiled from authentic documents, 
and will, we hope, be of interest in this stressful hour when the eyes of all civilization are cast toward the Orient. 



The history of China dates back nearly 
The First of the 5,000 years, but up to the year 2207 
Chinese Empire. B. C. it bears a mythical character. 

The Chinese myths begin with the 
reign of the Tien-hwang, Ti-hwang, and Yio-hwang (the 
celestial, the terrestial and the human rulers). After 
them, Puh-hi, who in the old legend appears also as a 
demi-god, became the founder of the Chinese empire 
(2852). 

He is said to have taught the people 

The First of the cattle raising and writing; to have in- 

Industries. troduced the divisions of the year, the 

institution of marriage, etc.; and to 
have died at the age of 200 years, after a reign of 115, or, 
as some accounts say, 164 years. His successor, Shin- 
nung, during a reign of 140 years, introduced agriculture 
and medical science. The next emperor, Hwang-ti, is be- 
lieved to cave invented weapons, wagons, ships, clocks 
and musical instruments, and to have introduced coins, 
weights and measures. His third successor, Ti-ku, es- 
tablished schools, and was the first to practice polygamy. 
In 2357 his son Yau ascended the throne, and it is from 
his reign that the regular historical records (Shu-king) 
begin. A great flood which occurred in his reign has been 
considered synchronous and identical with the Noachic 
deluge, and to Yau is ascribed the merit of having suc- 
cessfully battled against the waters. His reign lasted 
from 2357 to 2258, during which time he organized the 
political system of the country on a firm basis, fostered 
agriculture, industry and commerce, built canals, roads, 
etc. His son and successor, Shun (2255-2207), ruled in 
the same spirit. So far, if the old traditions are to be 
relied upon, China enjoyed a golden age of national felicity. 
The beginning of the later history of China inaugurates a 
series of internal broils, revolutions, wars and changes of 
dynasty. The immobility which is generally supposed to 
be the prominent characteristic of China does not appear 
in the history of her dynasties. 

The dynasty of Hia (2207-1767) was 

.The Dynasty founded by Yu the Great, who was the 

of Hia. first to unite supreme ecclesiastical 

power to the temporal authority. His 
grandson was dethroned by a popular revolution in favor 
of his brother Chung-kang, who held the reigns of govern- 
ment with a vigorous hand. Shan-kang succeeded to the 
throne after a period of war, and by him and his son Ti- 
chu the country is said to have been well governed. 
Thereafter the dynasty degenerated until it was expelled 
by a popular movement, and replaced by the dynasty of 
Shang or Yin, which gave twenty-eight rulers to the 
country (1766-1122), most of them vicious and cruel. The 
last one, Chowsin, terminated his miserable career in the 
same way as Sardanapalus. Wu-wang, the general who 
had succeeded in overthrowing him, became the founder of 
the dynasty of Chow and the regenerator of the empire. 
His dynasty ruled for a period of 873 years, the history of 
which is an almost uninterrupted catalogue of feuds, revo- 
lutions, wars with the Tartars, usurpations of princes 
and provincial governors. 

During the reign of Li-wang (671-544), 

The Great Wall the principal disciple and expounder of 

of China. Confucius, Meng-tse (Mencius) was 

born. The dynasty of Tsin (249-202) 
restored the unity of the empire by resubjecting the vas- 
sal states which had obtained independence under the pre- 
ceding weak rulers. Ching-wang (246-210) erected the 
great wall for the protection of the empire against the in- 
cursions of the Tartars, and assumed the title of hwang or 
emperor. Under the name of Tsin-chi hwang-ti, he is 
celebrated as the national hero of China. In order to de- 
stroy all traditions of the former political institutions, he 
decreed that all books treating of them should be burned. 
The writings of Confucius and Mencius were among them, 
a few fragments of which only could be found afterward. 



The dynasty of the Han (206 B. C. to A.D. 
Buddhism and 220) gave to the country the Emperors 
Literature Wen-ti (180 B. C), the restorer of the 
ancient literature; Wu-ti (141), a great 
patron of science and art; Siuen-ti (73), who subjected the 
Tartar country as far as the Caspian Sea; Ming-ti (A. D. 
58-76), under whose reign the Buddhist priest Ho-shung, 
from India, introduced the Buddhist creed, while the 
apostle Thomas is believed by the Armenian Christians to 
have been in China; and Ho-ti (89-106), who introduced 
the culture of the grape. About A. D. 200 a Roman em- 
bassy is said to have come to China. From 220 to 260 the 
empire was divided into three kingdoms, which were 
reunited by Wu-ti, the founder of the second dynasty of 
the Tsin (260-420). The Tartars, who had been kept in 
check by the former dynasty, now obtained a firm foot- 
hold in the northern portion of the empire, where they es- 
tablished an independent kingdom (386). Four dynasties 
(Sung, Tse, Liang and Chin) ruled the southern empire 
till 590, a period replete with domestic wars, religious dis- 
sensions, and palace revolutions. In 590 the prince of Sui, 
having subjected the Tartar kingdom, conquered also the 
southern empire and reunited them. He was a wise ruler, 
a promoter of science, education, industry and commerce. 
During the dynasty of the Tang (619-907) Christianity was 
preached by the Nestorian, Olopen (636.). The Emperor 
Kow-tsung extended his conquests to the boundaries of 
Persia. His son Tai-tsung was the Charlemagne or 
Haroun al-Raschid of China. His successors became ab- 
ject tools of their eunuch courtiers (9th century), who was 
destroyed by Chow-tsung (890), but too late to save the 
dynasty. 

Once more the empire was torn by the 
The Tartar and feuds of contending dynasties, and the 
the Dynasty. Tartars, whose relation to the Chinese 
empire was strikingly similar to that 
of the German tribes to the declining Roman empire, in- 
creased in power and importance. Tai-tsu, the founder 
of the dynasty of the Sung, and his successors (960-1279), 
under whose reign the arts and sciences flourished, were 
unable to keep the Tartars down. They were compelled 
to seek the aid of one tribe against another, but were in 
turn assailed by their allies, until the Mongolians overran 
the empire. Genghis Khan advanced on Peking in 1215. 
Kublai Khan (Chinese, She-tsu) established the first Mon- 
gol dynasty in China, having Peking as the capital city 
(1279-1368). The last emperor of the Sung dynasty 
drowned himself and family near Canton. The conquerors 
did not attempt to change the national customs and insti- 
tutions, but favored Buddhism. Kublai conquered Cochin 
China and Tonquin. In his reign the European traveler 
Marco Polo came to China. 

In 1294 the first Roman Catholic mis- 
First Coming of sionaries appeared at Peking. In 1342 
the Catholics. & famine having destroyed 13,000,000 
people, a general revolution broke out. 
In 1358 a Buddhist monk of low birth, Chu Yuen-chang, 
assumed the lead of the revolution, overthrew the Mon- 
golian dynasty, and ascended the throne under the name 
of Hung-wu. His dynasty (Ming) lasted 276 years (1368- 
1644), and gave to the country sixteen rulers, most of 
them efficient. About the middle of the 15th century the 
Tartars again invaded the empire, but were repelled. 
The invasions of the Mantchoos commenced under the 
reign of Shi-tsung (1522-1567). About the same time the 
Portuguese began to trade with the neighboring islands. 
In 1583 the Italian Jesuit Ricci was allowed to preach 
Christianity in China, and by conforming it in many 
respects with the traditions of Confucius he made many 
converts, even among the mandarins. In 1604 the Dutch 
sent three vessels to China, but were not admitted. 
When, in 1622, they tried to enter the empire by force, 
they were defeated; still they succeeded in establishing 
themselves on one of the Pescadore islands, which they 
afterwards exchanged for Formosa. 



July 21, 1900. 



BAN FT! \ 1 NEWS LETTER. 



«7 



In ir>15 the Mantohoos, exasperated in 
War Again In the consequence of the assas- 

Empire. order of the Chinese emperor, of 

king, had commenced hostilities, and 
when in lii'C> '4-1 the empire became again the theatre 
of internecine wars, they took sides with the defeated im- 
perial party against the insurgent usurper Litse ching, 
defeated him, entered Peking, and proclaimed Sbun-ohl, 
the youthful son of their own king, emperor of China lie 
was the founder of the present Mantchoo dynasty, which 
has succeeded well in overcoming the strong national 
antipathies of the Chinese. In 1653 the Dutch were once 
more refused admission, while the Russians were allowed 
to trade with the northern portion of the empire. Shun- 
chi was educated by the German Jesuit, Adam Scball, 
who, as president of the board of mathematicians, became 
in fact the prime minister. In 1661 Eang-hi succeeded to 
the throne. He conquered Formosa and Thibet, improved 
the financial condition of the government, promoted 
science and literature, established schools and colleges, 
had the different provinces of the empire surveyed and 
mapped by Europeans, and restored the Christian 
churches to the missionaries (1671). Two Frenchmen, 
Gerbillon and Bouvet, were bis favorite advisers. During 
bis reign the city of Peking was destroyed by an earth- 
quake, when, according to native accounts, 400,000 per- 
ished among the ruins. Yung-ching (1722-1736) expelled 
the missionaries from the schools, in consequence of his 
suspicions of their designs and dislike of their overbearing 
conduct. His son Kien-lung (1736-1796) extended his do- 
minion over the largest portion of Central Asia. 

Although in general just and well 

A Voluptuous meaning toward his subjects, he for a 

Monarch. ti me persecuted the Christians, and 

turned a deaf ear to the requests of 
European powers (Russia excepted) to be admitted to 
commercial intercourse with China. His successor Kia- 
king (1796-1820), a voluptuous and cruel monarch, was 
unable to check the anarchy created by insurrectionary 
movements against his tyrannical rule. In 1807 Mr. 
Morrison, the first Protestant missionary, came to Can- 
ton, translated the Bible into Chinese, and in conjunction 
with Mr. Milne established the Anglo-Chinese college at 
Malacca. In 1820 Tau-kwang ascended the throne (died 
Feb. 24, 185C). 

The most important event of his reign 

The Opium wa3 the first war with Great Britain, 

War. known as the opium war. The British, 

having sent an unsuccessful commer- 
cial expedition against China as early as 1596, did not ob- 
tain a foothold in that country until the end of the 17th 
century. An embassy which they sent to Peking in 1793 
under Lord McCartney was kindly received. The em- 
bassy under Lord Amherst in 1816 was not admitted into 
the presence of the emperor. The refusal was probably 
occasioned by Lord Amherst's unwillingness to perform 
the kotow, and did not result in any interference with the 
course of trade. Until 1834 commercial intercourse was 
conducted by the East India Company. In that year 
their charter ended, and Lord Napier was sent out by 
the British government to superintend the trade. He 
endeavored to communicate with the viceroy at Canton 
by letter and on terms of equality. This was refused, and 
led to the bringing up as far as Whampoa (12 miles below 
Canton) of two frigates, which received and answered the 
fire of the forts at the Bogue (Sept. 11, 1834). On Sept. 
21 Lord Napier retired to Macao, where he died three 
weeks later. After this trade was carried on without 
the immediate superintendence of the British officials till 
1837 (April 12), when Capt. Elliot, the British Commis- 
sioner, went to Canton under an agreement with the 
viceroy, which was a virtual adandonment of the position 
taken by Lord Napier, and acknowledgment of Chinese 
superiority. Capt. Elliot justified his action by a state- 
ment that the relations between the Chinese authorities 
and the merchants were in a precarious condition. This 
condition arose out of a discussion as to whether the trade 
in opium, which had been carried on in an illicit manner, 
should be legalized, and there was danger that the gov- 
ernment would not only decide the question unfavorably, 
but take some active measures to put down the traffic. 



Such a decision was subsequently 
Bui Opium Trade reached, and in the autumn of 
Continues. Capt. Elliot was directed by the vice- 
roy to drive awav the opium ve^ 
and to notify his government that they must not come 
again. The trade went on, however, under greater or 
less restrictions and difficulties, until the early part of the 
year 1839, when a special commissioner named Lin ap- 
peared with strenuous orders to thoroughly suppress it. 
One of his first steps was to demand the surrender of all 
opium. This order was complied with, and Lin was di- 
rected bv bis government to destroy it. Tbe whole 
quantity, 20,291 chests, valued at about $10,000,000, was 
placed in trenches, mixed with lime, and sea water ad- 
mitted, a procedure by which the desired result was most 
perfectly accomplished. This measure did not, however, 
suppress the trade. More opium arrived and was sold 
clandestinely. In consequence of the continued irritation 
and the persistent efforts of the commissioner to suppress 
the traffic, the British residents were withdrawn from 
Canton, and afterward from the Portuguese colony of 
Macao, and on Dec. 6 trade with the English was declared 
at an end. These circumstances led to the war of 1840- 
'42, known as the opium war. The British forces appeared 
off Macao June 22, 1840. On July 4 the island of Chusan, 
off the mouth of the Yang-tse river, was occupied. Simul- 
taneously the ports of Amoy and Ningpo, and the mouths 
of the Mm and 5Tang-tse rivers were blockaded. The 
British plenipotentiaries proceeded toward Peking, and 
on Aug. 11 anchored off the mouth of the Pei-ho river. 
The Chinese officer Ki-shen met them there, and it was 
arranged that the discussion of matters at issue should be 
referred to Canton. Negotiations were continued at Can- 
ton as arranged for, and a treaty was effected. 

It was not ratified by the Chinese em- 
Treaty and peror, and on Feb. 19 hostilities were 
Ransom. resumed, and the British fleet moved 

up to the city of Canton. On the 26th 
the Chinese paid a ransom of $6,000,000, and the British 
prepared to leave their investing lines. The evacuation 
was very soon completed, and trade was re-opened and 
continued throughout the war, which was prosecuted in 
the north. Amoy was captured on Aug. 27, Chusan was 
occupied a second time on Sept. 29, and Ningpo on Oct. 
13. Desultory operations continued throughout the win- 
ter. In May, 1842, Chapoo was captured, and on June 16 
and 19 Woosung and Shanghai, respectively, were occu- 
pied. In the latter part of July Chinkiang was invested 
and captured, and the forces moved to Nanking, 40 miles 
beyond Chinkiang. The native authorities, anticipating 
the loss of their ancient capital, and thoroughly humbled 
by the events of the war, sued for peace, and a treaty 
was effected. 

If you have suits, gowns, gloves, laces, tapestries, ribbons, or any- 
thing else that requires renovation, send them to the Spaulding 
Gleaning and Dyeing establishment, 127 Stockton street. Here things 
are cleaned in the most approved fashion. The best of workmen and 
apparatus are employed, and the prices are reasonable. Spaulding 
will make your husband's old suit of clothes look like new. 



There are whiskies and whiskies, and much depends on the kind 
yon drink. Bad whiskey means bad health, bad temper and a bad 
habit. The J. F. Cutter brand is smooth as satin, delicate of flavor, 
and nourishing. It tickles the palate of the fastidious drinker. E. 
Martin & Co., 54 First street, are sole agents for the United 
States . 

Miss Louise Thiele deslreB a few more piano pupils. Experienced teacher: 
latest, method: terms 50c. an hour: home eveniners. 355 San Carlos ave., S. P. 




LONDON ASSURANCE. 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,760 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,376 

Assets 10.19S.14S 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets , 2,502,060 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2i, 1900. 






&own Crier 



"Mear the Crier?' Mat the devil art lhou.V 
'One that will play the devil ,jir,withyou ' 




IN European capital, 
"When dames for court are dressed, 
'Tis said they 're wearing bodices 

Much lower in the chest. 
And at our own domestic hearth, 

Dame Fashion's late decree 
Declares our wives must wear their skirts 
Not much above the knee. 

Tut, tut ! What are we coming to 1 

Will fashions soon resemble 
The natural attractions of 

Parisian tout ensemble t 

THERE has always been a feud between newspapermen 
and lawyers. The reason for it is that there are a 
few so-called newspaper men who are despised of their fel- 
lows, who hang about the fringe of their eraft, living by 
their wits; and by these some lawyers judge the profes- 
sion. On the other hand there are many lawyers who 
thrive as shysters and blacklegs, men who are without 
honor, education, or standing. Occasionally they have 
the education, but no other quality of excellence. The two 
sets of crooks drift together as naturally as water seeks 
a level, and the respectable element of both callings con- 
clude that the other is morally rotten. This is all wrong. 
The Crieb, as a newspaper man of long experience, is as- 
sured that here and there is a lawyer who does not de- 
serve to be in jail, and who would not even lie without a 
retainer. 

WHEN a man is found senseless on the pavement it is 
nothing more than right that he should be treated for 
a broken skull if such be his trouble. There is manifest 
injustice in regarding him as drunk and permitting him 
to die in the demonstration of his own innocence. Steward 
McKenzie of the Receiving Hospital may take these re- 
marks to himself, as they are devised for his benefit. If 
he can't tell a dying man from a drunk he is unfit to fill 
the station he does, and if he is able to make the distinc- 
tion and finds the making of it too much trouble he is unfit 
to fill any station, save po?sibly a portion of the police 
station. A Coroner's jury censured McKenzie for his 
brutal and stupid neglect in the case of Curley, deceased, 
but this neither revives Curley nor stops the pay of Mc- 
Kenzie. 

IT would not be much to ask of the dailies that thev omit 
from their pages the horrible, hideous pictures of real 
or fancied atrocities in China. People are anxious to read 
the news; they cannot avoid seeing the illustrations, and that 
these cause needless distress, and sometimes actual illness 
is perfectly natural. No person of ordinary feeling desires 
to see a row of dissevered heads grinning during break- 
fast, nor does the spectacle of a crucified figure writhing 
in agony tend to promote the appetite. Even the repre- 
sentation of a gentleman with his thumb stuck into a split 
post and a Mongol lessening the width of the split is 
neither instructive, edifying, nor an expression of sweet 
regard for the reader. 

THERE is over in Marin a far famed deer known as 
"Toe," a wild and knowing creature who has thus far 
declined to be shot. Many ambitious hunters are anxious 
to kill "Toe." Why ? Because he is alive, free and beauti- 
ful; because there lingers in the human breast still the 
instinct of the savage. The Crier hopes that "Toe" will 
escape, and that as he capers into the redwoods the per- 
forated hide of some hunter will be flapping triumphantly 
from his horns. 

DOCUMENTS have been discovered at Pretoria show- 
ing that certain visiting foreigners received substan- 
tial inducement from President Kruger in order that they 
might uphold the Boer cause abroad. Webster Davis 
must have passed a very bad quarter of an hour when he 
heard the news. 



0' 



WHILE the Crier does not go in for politics, he con- 
fesses to a sense of amusement whenever he observes 
John P. Irish abusing Bryan. Irish is a gold Democrat of 
so radical a sort that he is entitled to all the emoluments 
of office goine to a faithful Republican. When he jumped 
one way and Bryan the opposite, each was certain that 
the other did the jumping. Irish takes the trouble to say 
so frequently, but Bryan, having forgotten the existence 
of Irish, doubtless regards the incident as closed. It's all 
right, even commendable, to be a gold Democrat; much 
better than being the copper-headed type that Irish used 
to be, and yet his multitude of defenses seems much like 
an aroused conscience trying to smother its qualms. 

DETECTIVES Gibson and Egan sought to have the 
Police Commission revoke the saloon license of Leo 
Franks. They showed that Franks kept a disreputable 
place, and that upon a recent attempted murder there, 
Franks bad concealed the weapons employed, and given 
the officers misleading information. In other words, 
Franks had become accessory after the fact. But the 
Commission did not revoke the license. Information was 
conveyed to the gentleman that his conduct was not en- 
dorsed, and to refrain from duplicating it would be es- 
teemed a favor. There is nothing like gentleness in tam- 
ing the rampant dive-keeper. 

ONE Thomas Harkins a few months ago broke his arm 
by a fall, and while he was laid up his wife bravely 
earned the family living. When Thomas had recovered 
he had so thoroughly acquired the habit of being fed that 
he resented the idea of going to work, and threatened to 
kill his wife if his supply of beer money waned. She had 
to have the brute arrested, and he ought to be sentenced 
to life, and put under bonds to reach a ripe age. If this 
cannot be done, Thomas is counseled to fall once more in 
the hope of next time breaking his neck. 
yNLY to hear you warble, 
Only to hear your voice, 
Only the faintest whisper 

Would make my heart rejoice. 

Only the faintest whisper, 

Spoken to cheer me, dear; 
Speak but a word of comfort. 

Into my straining ear. 

List to my pleading, central- 
Say, is my calling vain? 

Speak, though you only murmur, 
"Line busy, call again!" 

ftTTENTION of those whom it may concern is called to 
the fact that an old man who had been too stingy to 
be decent and too mean to have an heir, has just died, 
leaving $31,000 in different city banks. Had this hap- 
pened a few weeks ago, there would have been a wild 
legal scramble for the pile, and the devil take the hind- 
most; but now the danger exists that an awakened police 
might take the foremost. However, the prize is worth 
striving for, and attorneys without reputation to lose will 
find a way of getting their arms into it up to the elbows. 

« WOMAN, whose name is not worth mentioning, re- 
cently tried to throw a corrosive acid in the face of a 
man of similar title. He turned the tables, or rather the 
bottle, on her, and it was her beauty that got scarred. Here 
was an instance of stern justice. The difference between 
throwing acid and attempting murder is all in favor of 
the latter diversion. It is possible to offend so as to de- 
serve killing, but not so as to have the eye burned out. 
The lady tried to revenge herself like a Boxer. 

THE lady who writes to a daily paper protesting that 
the missionaries could never have called for vengeance 
may be a person of much moral excellence, but her bonnet 
does not cover any brains. Possibly the missionaries were 
not wise in going abroad, but they showed some nerve, 
and at a time of great emergency' there is no likelihood 
that they would suddenly degenerate from intelligent men 
and women into a lot of spineless, bloodless and contempt- 
ible its. 

" rrsHERE'S not a sensation," the editor said, 
^ "Not a sickening fact that is new." 

So he ordered the telegraph-room overhead 
To kill a legation or two. 



July Hi 1900. 



SAN FKV 1 NEWS LETTER. 



»9 




- 



'■'^ ' " 



Terscnalif 



— — . 



Sandow's Magazine contains some striking hints as 

to the manner in which some of the most popular men of 
the dav reveal the secret of their strength. Colonel 
Baden Powell has a wide, massive chin, which projects in 
front; bis under-lip also projects. From the massiveness 
we deduce determination; from the projection, force of 
character; while the width shows strength of purpose, 
faithfulness, and power; the projecting lip shows love of 
popularity. Sir Redvers Buller's chin is somewhat similar, 
but it is even wider and more massive; it is also doubled. 
The extra width shows the determination and even ob- 
stinacy with which he carries out his plans, the doubling 
showing an appreciation of good living which would resent 
a straitened commissariat. Lord Kitchener, too, has the 
prominent and broad chin, which seems a necessary fea- 
ture of all great military leaders. The indentation below 
the under-lip gives him an unusual power of attracting 
the loving and unquestioned fidelity of his followers; the 
somewhat indrawn lower lip shows him to be singularly re- 
gardless of public favor, and more likely to shirk than en- 
joy the worship of the multitude. Kipling's chin looks 
like that of a military chief, for it is broad, massive, and 
projecting; but it is short, and there is a clift at the 
point. The shortness shows a want of physical force, and 
the dent shows his literary power, so the resultant of the 
whole chin is that of one who can most successfully mar- 
shal his soldiers upon paper. 

Some of the papers have a naive way of communi- 
cating their guesses at truth when they wish their readers 
to believe that they deal in sober facts. Thus the Cincin- 
nati Enquirer observes with a charming air of innocence: 
"It is not generally known in this country that the term 
of office of Lord Wolseley as Commander-in-Chief of the 
British Army comes to a close this fall. While there may 
be valid reasons for retaining Wolseley in office, in case he 
should consent to accept continued responsibility, there is 
one reason why he might not be inclined to do so. Accord- 
ing to the present arrangements Lord Kitchener of Khar- 
toum is to become permanent Minister of War, and this 
would render Wolseley subordinate to Kitchener, a condi- 
tion that would be very repugnant to the former, as he 
would be compelled to receive orders from the man who 
avenged Chinese Gordon." It would be pleasant to know 
what Lord Lansdowne would say to an absurd canard like 
this I 

A correspondent sends the Cape Argus the follow- 
ing fully authenticated instance of a gracious act on the 
part of Lord Methu'en : A little boy of six and a half years 
in England, when he heard that Lord Methuen was short 
of cavalry, with childish simplicity wrote and offered to 
lend him his box of toy soldiers (Hussars and Lancers). 
The great General, amidst all the anxiety and turmoil of 
the smoking battlefields of the Modder river, found time 
graciously to reply, thanking him for his offer, and advis- 
ing him to ke6p his soldiers, as they might get killed or 
wounded if he sent them there. 

Mr. Crokerhas set himself down atLetcombe Regis, 

in Berkshire, and very close to Wantage. Now, Wantage 
is the birthplace of the greatest and most heroic and 
patriotic of English kings, Alfred the Great, whose 
Millenary Anniversary we are to celebrate next year. 
Alfred, the hero-king, and Mr. Croker, of Tammany— it is 
a weird contrast 1 

THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) offers 
Eastern passengers three elegantly appointed vestibuled express 
trains daily between Chicago and New York and Chicago and Boston. 
For sleeping car reservations and full information address Jay W. 
Adams, Pac. Coast Pass. Agt., 37 Crocker Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Allen's Pbess Clipping Br/BEAU, 610 Montgomery street. San Franoleco 
deals In all kinds ol newspaper Information, business, personal, politioal. 
from press of State, coast and countryTel. Main 1042. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 3AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER ENGLAND 

80LID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON. Manager, 439 California street. S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Founded A. D. 1792 



Insurance 



Oompany of / lorth A 



menca 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 15 022,016 

JAMES D. BALLET. General Agent, 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, S3.446.100 Assets. (24,034.110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. (9.612.455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

601-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Oompany 

of New Zealand 
Capital. $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hookeb & Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN. Generar Agents 



413 California street. S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital 81,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,R69,451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2.068.839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San FTanclsco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 
Capital J6.700.000 



BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 



316 California street, S. F. 



Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital. 83,000.000 Gross Assets. 812,808,395 

Surplus to Policy-holders. 87,631.926 
H, L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast Statea, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment op Losses 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N." BCHLESTNGER. City Agent 804 Montgomery street San Franolsoo 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1900. 




THE following conditions, which are of interest to in- 
surance companies doing or contemplating doing 
business in Alaska, are part of Chapter 36 entitled "An 
Act Making Further Provision for a Civil Government for 
Alaska." The same having been approved June 6, 1900: — 

" Sec. 360. No company, corporation, or association, or firm, or 
individual shall be permitted to transact a life, tire, or marine insur- 
ance business in the district until he or it has filed in the office of 
the secretary of the district a certificate by the secretary of state or 
other proper officer of some State of the United States, setting forth 
that the said company, corporation, association, firm, or individual 
has been qualified to carry on the business of insurance in such 
State in accordance with the laws thereof. 

" Sec. 361. No insurance company, corporation, association, firm 
or individual shall be permitted to transact a life, fire or marine in- 
surance business in the district until it shall have tiled with the clerk 
of each division of the district court a power of attorney, which shall 
set forth that such company is a corporation or duly organized in- 
surer (naming the principal place of business of the company and 
principal place of business for the Pacific Coast), which power of 
attorney shall authorize a citizen and resident of the district to 
receive and accept service in any proceeding in a court of justice of 
the district. If any attorney of any insurance company appointed 
under the provisions of this section shall remove from the district 
or become disqualified in any manner from accepting service, and 
if any citizen or resident of the district shall have any claim by 
virtue of any insurance policy issued by any such company not re- 
presented by attorney in the district, valid service may be made on 
such company by service on the clerk of the district court or any 
division thereof : PROVIDED, in such case the clerk of the dis- 
trict conrt shall immediately notify such company and the prin- 
cipal agent for the Pacific Coast, inclosing a copy of the service by 
mail, postpaid: AND PROVIDED FURTHER, In such case no 
proceedings shall be had within sixty days after such service on the 

clerk." 

» » » 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
California Insurance Company the directors were reduced 
from nine to five, consisting of L. L. Bromwell, M. A. 
Newell, A. Hermann, F. W. Van Sicklen and E. B. Pond. 
Mr. M. A. Newell was elected to succeed Daniel Meyer as 
treasurer. The office was removed to 317 California street. 
This is indicative of the reorganization of the California. 
It may confidently be expected that it will be doing busi- 
ness in the early fall. 

Insurance Commissioner Cutting of Massachusetts, in 
his Life Report does not waste any encomiums on the 
Provident Savings Life Assurance Society of New York 
and also pays his respects to another company. He says: 

" There is perhaps no business transaction among men, defined 
by written terms, that is so one-sided and absolutely blind to one of 
the parties as the modern life insurance policy. In all cases the 
contract is drawn up by the shrewdest technical skill. It is filled 
with terms, stipulations, and conditions, that are and from the 
nature of the case must be a wholly unknown and mysterious 
tongue to the average applicant. He asks for an ordinary life policy, 
for instance, and what purports to be such is given him. He doesn't 
read it, for he knows that would be a waste of time, and no use; he 
could know no better then than before. He relies wholly upon the 
representations of the agent and the reputation of the company, and 
thonsands and thousands of times he has been deceived by the sharp 
solicitor." 

That this is true there can be no doubt, and until com- 
panies shall draw their contracts in such a manner that 
the public can understand them and employ to sell their 
contracts only men who will sell them honestly, this under- 
standing will always continue to be a source of trouble to 
companies and to policy-holders. 
» * * 

C. E. Mabie is now negotiating to re insure the Ameri- 
can Union Life Insurance Company of New York. This 
company was organized by P. B. Armstrong in 1894. 

# # # 

The dinner of the San Francisco Life Underwriters 
Association has been postponed until some time in August. 



In this city last week Judge Sewell sustained the de- 
murrer to the complaint in the suitof CharlesG. Gebhardt, 
executor of the estate of the late Jonathan Lloyd White, 
to recover $53,883 from the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany of New York. In August 1898, White paid $53,883 
to the Mutual for an annuity of $3,600 a year. Four 
months later he lost his life in the Baldwin Hotel fire. 
His executor sued to recover the original sum paid. The 
court finds for the Company. 

* # it- 
Coast fire underwriting has been very profitable during 

the first six months of 1900. The average loss ratio is be- 
low 40 per cent. 

# * # 

Commissioner Clunie is making an effort to compel the 
various bond and depenture companies doing business in 
this State to report to the insurance department. 

A new Life Insurance Company known as the Conser- 
vative Life has been organized in Los Angeles. 

Clarence Smith of the Northwestern Mutual is in Mil- 
waukee attending the annual meeting of the agents of the 
company. He will return about August 1. 

Fred Stolp, Manager of the National Life, is visiting in 
Vermont. 

There is a strong probability that the headquarters of 
the Board of Fire Underwriters will be moved from 303 
California street to the new building now being erected on 
the corner of Montgomery and California streets. 



The improved machinery and the expert workmen employed by 
the Spanlding Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, have 
done away with the horrors of carpet cleaning. Many persons put 
up with dirty carpets just because they dread the process of renova- 
tion and cleaning. At the Spaulding establishment the work is done 
with dispatch and thoroughness, and old soiled and dusty carpets 
are made to look like new. 

8hobthand, typewriting; individual instruction; attention to 
orthography, etc., $5 per month. Typewriting done on short notice. 
214 McAllister street, Room 18, Telephone 276. 




The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 

(Oreanlzed 1868.) Paid Policyholders, (11,000,000 

Kilgabif & Beaver, General Aeents Life Department 
F. W. Vooot, General A«ent Accident Department. 

Pacific Mutual Building, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital. J2.250.000 Assets (10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manaee 
Pact tic Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street. S. F. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief 
of suffering humanity, all forms Watee Tbeatment, the finest 
Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electbical apparatus, A 
Corps of well trained nurses of both sexes, skilled in all forms of 
treatments and manipulations, Rest Cure scientifically carried out. 
The Purest and best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * A 

?[uiet, home-like place, beautiful scenery, Mount Hamilton and the 
amous Lick Observatory in plain view; one block from electric 
cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city. Terms $10 to 
$20 per week, including medical attention and regular treatment. 
Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 



July 21, 1900. 



SAN ri:\ \r\VS LETTER. 



5unnER Resorts , 

TV. Vrw. I rrrrR h*.« calftMUhcd ml (U> oftt '.■ «m; *tr*«4, » 

trlUMe Rurt*u "I Information where anyone Keeking Information. rmit«* 
• >f ir*i ri. Atlr*etlortA, prtcw «f entertainment, and nil other fuel* that *rr 
Wf to * choice of • Summer Boaort ra*y be obtained FREE. 



RUBICON SODA SPRINGS, 

The waters of these springs possess marvelous 
curative properties, especially effective in the cure 
of stomach, liver and kidney disorders, and are 
an absolute specific for rheumatic gout, nervous 
dyspepsia, and catarrh. 

Situated in the romantic Rubicon Valley, ten 
miles west of Lake Tahoe. 

Stage daily, connecting with steamer at Mc* 
Kinney's. Kates, $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week. 
Table second to none. Altitude. 6000 feet. 



Now Open 



D. ABBOTT, Proprietor. 



THE TALLAC 



Lake Tahoe, Cal. 



Open for the season from May 15th. Give 
your family an entire change of climate. No 
more staging; railroad from Truckee to 
Tahoe. Dr. Pottenger, resident physician. 
For information, inquire of Traveler Bureau, 
20 Montgomery street, or address 

M. LAWRENCE Z> GO. - - - - 



Tallac. 



Lake county 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natnral Mineral 
Steam Baths in . . 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address. 

J. Anderson. Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return 
reduced to $8. Send for circular. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Letter, 5^ Kearny St., 8. F. 



HOTEL BENVENUE and COTTAGES 

Lakeport, Gal, 

Lakepokt's Sommee Resort. Situated overlooking the shore on 
Clear Lake. New Pavilion, boatbouse, and bowling alley. Open all 
the year. Special facilities for accommodating families with child- 
ren; borne cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing. 
Lovely drives and walks. Bates, ?7 per week. 

PRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

SKAGGS" HOT SPRINGS, 

SONOMA COUNTY, only 4% hours from San Fran- 
cisco and but 9 miles' staffing; waters noted for medicinal virtues: best 
natural bath in the State; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at 
door; photosraphers' room, telephone, telegraph, dally mail: first-class 
hotel and stage service ; morning and afternoon stages. Round trip from 
San Francisco only $5.50. Take Tiburon ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3:30 p.m. 
Terms, $2 per day or 812 per week. References: Any guest of the past five 
years. Patronage constantly increasing.' _ 

J. F. MTJLGREW. Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS VILLA 

Kervt Station, Ross Ualley, Marin Go. 

A popular summer resort, 45 minutes from the city: salt water 
bathing, boating, fishing, etc. Terms reasonable; reduction to fam- 
ilies. For particulars, address . , 

Mas. E. Patterson, Proprietress. 
Take Sausalito Ferry. 



LAUREL DELL LAKE 



Lake County 



The mo9t attractive place in Lake County 
to spend your vacation. Boating, bathing, 
bowling, tennis, livery, new walks, etc. 
Write for circular. 



H, WAMBOLD, 



Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



HOBERG'S RESORT 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand five 
hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, lowest prire. 
First-class family table and pleasant rooms, seven to 
eight dollars per week ; surrounding scenery unsurpassed 
by any springs in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. 
Buy ticket direct for Hoberg's, Lake county, Cal. 
George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 



It is just lovely now at 



No fogs; warm and bright 
Soda water baths. 



NAPA SODA SPRINGS 

Swimming pool. 



HOTEL VENDOME, San Jose. 

One of California's most attractive resoits. The 
starting point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for c> cling and diiv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly- 
kept and up-to-date hotel in Central California. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., or address 



GEO. P. SNELL, Manager. 



HOTEL del CORONADO 

Motto: " Best of everything." Costs no more than plainer resorts. 

BEST: Beach, Table, Water, Climate. 
Boating, Bathing, Fishing. 

GOLF, TENNIS, and all games. Most delightful summer 
climate. Best Mineral Water on the Coast. Address 
E. 9. BABCOCK, M'G'R.. Coronado. Cal. 

THE CELEBRATED SISSON TAVERN 

Now open. Situated at the foot of Mt. Shasta, half a mile from 
the station. Free buss meets trains. Altitude 3500 feet. . Fresh 
cream and dairy produce. Climate unsurpassed ; average beat, 80 
degrees. Any one wishing to spend an outing in the mountains 
will find this a most desirable place. No poison oak. For further 
information, address Mas. L. M. Sisson. 

THE THOUSAND ISLAND HOUSE 

Thousand Islands, Alexan- 
dria Bay, NEW YORK 

The Thousand 'tiflittid 
House is without doubt the 
mostdesirableand delight- 
ful summer lesort in the 
country. A thoroughly 
modern and up-to-date 
house equipped , with a 
large number of public and 
private baths, and lighted 
throughout with electric- 
ity. The region in which 
this hotel stands is one of 
those places nature seems 
to have created for the sole 
pleasure of man. The 
beautiful St. Lawrence River, with its current ever flowing to the sea, its 
more than "1000 islands," some large, some small. Nowhere in the country 
can fishing and boating be so thoroughly enjoyed. For fuller information 
send two 2-cent stamps for illustrated booklet and rates, to O. G. Staples, 
Biggs House, Washington, D. C, or Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 




22 



SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1900. 




IN the present dearth of social events the coming of Sur- 
geon-General Sternberg, U. S. A., may be regarded as 
a veritable god-send, he and Mrs. Sternberg being the 
motif tor one of the most enjoyable receptions given for 
some time. Dr. and Mrs. Forwood were the host and 
hostess, and the reception was held on Tuesday evening in 
Maple Hall at the Palace Hotel. The decorations of palms 
and ferns, with a lavish display of roses, made a pretty 
setting for the daintily gowned ladies, who nearly all be- 
longed to army circles, though there was more than a 
sprinkling of civilian belles present, and many of the offi- 
cers appeared in uniform. A stringed military orchestra 
provided the music and elaborate refreshments were 
served. Among the guests were General Shafter, Colonel 
Rawles, commanding officer at the Presidio, Mr. and Mrs. 
Rawles, Colonel and Mrs. J. V. D. Middleton, Mrs. and 
Miss Freeman, the Misses Marshall, Colonel and Mrs. 
Pope, Colonel and Mrs. Girard, Major and Mrs. Arthur, 
Major and Mrs. Rucker, Captain and Mrs. Danes, Captain 
and Mrs. Rumbaugh, Colonel, Mrs., and Miss Mordecai, 
Major, Mrs. and Miss Loring, Dr. and Mrs. Cutter, Mrs. 
W. L. Kneedler, Captain and Mrs. Ord, Captain Dyer, 
Captain and Mrs. Shaw. 

Among the prettiest of Oakland's weddings was the 
ceremonial at the First Presbyterian church last Tuesday, 
when Miss Eva Heimbold and Frank A. Jackson were 
united in marriage by the Reverend Dr. Coyle. Pink Bow- 
ers were used in profusion, and combined with palms, pep- 
per leaves, and ferns, made the interior of the chapel a 
very attractive scene. The bride, who was gowned in 
white chiffon over white silk, was attended by Miss Anita 
Heimbold as maid-of-honor, who wore white organdie over 
green silk, and the Misses Margaret and Henrietta Heim- 
bold as bridesmaids, who were attired in cream white or- 
gandie over pink silk. The Reverend George Roach sup- 
ported the groom as best man. A small reception followed 
the ceremony, and the young couple are spending their 
honeymoon in Portland, Oregon. 

Last Wednesday was the wedding day of Miss Maie 
Louise Harrison, daughter of Wm. Greer Harrison, whose 
marriage to George H. Walkington was solemnized at 
Christ Church, Bondsbury, London, that afternoon, and 
was followed by a reception at the residence of the bride's 
mother in Christ Church avenue. 

Dinners still rule the roost at San Rafael and one of the 
most frequent hosts of this pleasant form of entertainment 
is Ed Greenway, whose parties occupy the private room 
of the Hotel Rafael several evenings every week. Golf has 
again taken the lead there in out of door sports and the 
tournament which began last Saturday has been watched 
with interest. The paper-chase has so far this season 
failed to materialize, but no doubt it will be seen and 
heard later on. Miss Grace Hecht is one of the most re- 
cent additions to the San Rifael belles as the guest of her 
sisters, the Mesdames Gerstle and Mrs. Edie, who re- 
turned by the Hancock from Manila last week. Colonel 
and Mrs. Maus have returned for another week's visit to 
the Hotel Rafael; Mrs. Maus expects to go East on a 
visit to her mother about the first of August but will be 
back again in San Francisco early in September. 

Alaska has been gradually dropping out of favor as a 
point for the summer tourist. Perhaps it is that during 
the first flush of its novelty nearly all those who could 
stand the long sea voyage made the trip and do not care 
to repeat it, and tourists coming to us from afar are con- 
tent with the beauties of our Golden State. Be that as it 
may there has been few Alaskan pilgrims this year; the 
most recent to depart was Mrs. Robert Fry, who was 
accompanied by Mrs. Jean Bowers of Los Angeles. 

Mrs. C. L. Bent has returned from her visit to Camp 
Wallace, Idaho, and is again the guest of her mother Mrs. 
Cohen at Fernside, Alameda. 



The arrival of another Miss Flood has been the cause of 
many congratulations to her father "Jim" and her aunt 
Miss Jenny. The new Flood mansion on Pacific avenue is 
now well under way and pending its completion Mr. and 
Mrs. Jim will occupy the Freeborn house on Jackson street, 
which is now being made ready for them. 

The friends of the Friedlander family have been doiDg 
the civil this week to Carey Friedlander's fair fiancee, 
Miss Jessie Cbeevers of Los Angeles, who is here engaged 
in the pleasing occupation of selecting her trousseau for 
her approaching marriage. A. J. Bowie, the well-known 
mining engineer, will return from the Klondike in time for 
his brother-in-law Carey's wedding. 

Mrs. W. L. Kneedler and her daughters arrived by the 
transport Hancock from Manila, where Dr. Kneedler, 
U. S. A., is at present; Mrs. H. M. Sewall and children 
were among the passengers from Honolulu by the 
Australia and are the guests of Mrs. C. L. Ashe on 
Sacramento street; Charley Eagan also came over by the 
same steamer, from his plantation in Hawaii. 

Our tourists abroad are already commencing to come 
borne and Mr. and Mrs. James Follis, nee Maybelle Gwin, 
who made a honeymoon tour of the world, are among the 
avanl couriers. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carolan and Miss 
Emily are again at home from their trip abroad, Mrs. 
Carolan's serious illness in Paris quite spoiling the antici- 
pated pleasure of their visit to the Exposition; Mrs. Phil 
Wooster and Mrs. Ruby Bond are among those now en 
route. 

The news that Lieutenant Jack Haines, U. S. A., has 
been ordered from San Francisco to San Diego has been 
received by the younger set with much regret. As a 
cotillion leader Lieutenant Haines has proved a great 
success. 

Following is a list of San Francisco people now at Hotel 
Del Monte: Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hirsch and family, Mr. 
and Mrs. John Parrott and family, Mrs. A. M. Parrott, 
Mrs. Edward Rothschild, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Graham, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Rosenbaum, Mr. and Mrs. J. Downey 
Harvey, Miss Harvey, Miss Genevieve Harvey, J. W. 
Byrne, Mrs. Margaret Irvine, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Lewis, Miss Edna Lewis, Mrs. W. H. Crocker and family, 
Princess Poniatowski and family, Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hel- 
ler, Miss Blanche Bachman, Mrs. Henry Scbriiiedell, Mrs. 
E. R. Frank, Raymond Frank, Lady Wolseley and family, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Worden, Mrs. A. N. Towne, Edward 
Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Laton, Miss Alice Hager, Miss 
Ethel Hager, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, Miss 
Jolliffe, Mrs. A. D. Martin, Miss McNutt, Miss Murphy, 
Miss Ruth McNutt, J. E Heaton, L N. Washington, Mrs. 
H. C. Benson, Mrs. T. H. Breeze, Miss Liuisa Breeze, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Knapp, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Viocent, 

A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever: 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Bash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept 110 couuterf eit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you ( ladiee 
will use them. I recommend *Gour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sal© 
by all druggists and Fancy-goods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 

Columbia Theatre- Extra. 

BURTON HOLMES LECTURES 

Direction Henry Miller. Illustrations in colore. Appropriate 
motion pictures. Two courses exactly alike. 

Six Thursday Matinees at 2;30 
S'x Sunday Eveninas at 8*30 
"Manila." July 19th and 22d; "Japan Revisited," July 2fitli ant 
29th; "Round About Paris," August 2d and 5th; "Grand Canon," 
August 9th and 12th; "Moki Land," August 16th and 19th; "Ha- 
waiian Islands," 23d and 26th. 
Reserved seats, 81, 75c., and 50c., ready Monday. 




July ii, 1900. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEW S UTTER. 



»3 



J T. Duod, Mr*. L. Holmes. Mrs. R. Tallroan. Miss Marion 
Earle. Mrs. Aubrey Wilhoit, Mrs. A. H. Hill. Mr. and 
Mrs H. A. Kiojj, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Gentle, 'aplain 
A. H. Paysoo, and Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Scholle and family. 

The Burton Ho'mes lectures seem to have caught the 
popular fancy at the Columbia Theatre, and Henry 
Miller's direction of them will turn out a very profitable 
affair. The first lecture was given on Thursday after- 
noon, and the same subject, "Manila," dwelt upon on that 
occasion, will be the one for the lecture to be given to- 
morrow, Sunday night. The illustrations for this, as well 
as all the lectures of the series, are most effective. The 
coioriogs are beautiful. On next Thursday afternoon and 
Sunday night Mr. Brown, who delivers the lecture, will 
have "Japan Revisited" as his subject. 

Recent arrivals at Hotel del Coronado from San Fran- 
cisco are: Mr. acd Mrs. Martin Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. 
Chas. D. Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Hall and party, Mr. 
and Mrs. G. Hatton, R. B Huie. HL«s Ida B. French, MUs 
Emily A. Hawkins. D. W. J. Hawkins, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
G. Gebhardt, Miss M. E. Healy, and Mr. and Mrs. A. M. 
Shields, Mr. and Mrs. Lendal, M. Gray, Mr. Jav Adams, 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Knight, Mr. and Mis. P. S. Kelly, W. 
H. Stanley, Mrs. H. S. Kingsbury, Mrs. Anderson, Miss 
Anderson, Mrs. A. Harris, and S. C. Pardee. 

Mrs. C. F. Mullens and Miss Mullens of San Francisco 
gave a bowling party at Hotel del Coronado Monday even- 
ing, among the guests being a number of San Francisco 
folks. 

The polo and pony races at the Hotel del Monte begin 
on August 13th. There will be golf every morning, com- 
mencing August 13th, and polo every afternoon the first 
four days— 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th— and baseball Satur- 
day morning, the 18th. This marks the fifth annual meet- 
ing of the Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing Associa- 
tion. All ponies entered in any polo-pony race must have 
been played in the polo tournament held at Del Monte 
during the same week. 

Very quietly last Saturday Rudolph Herold packed up 
his little grip, went out of town and was married. Three 
is the lucky number, and this is the third. 

Over at the Hotel Belvedere there is a jolly crowd en- 
joying the season for all it is worth. Rowing, and launch- 
ing and swimming and fishing parties are the pet diversions 
by day. At night there is music on land and sea. The 
ark residents vie with the hotel guests in hospitable enter- 
prise. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Payne, after an absence of two 
years in New York and the East, have returned and are 
the guests of Dr. and Mrs. Redmond Payne. They have 
taken permanent quarters at Hotel Savoy. 

Sir William MacCormac, writes a correspondent, 

has always been a stickler for fresh air, as is evidenced by 
an incident which occurred at the Mechanics' Institute, 
Belfast, some twenty-five years ago. The occasion was 
the distribution of prizes to the successful students at the 
science and art classes, and the room was so crowded that 
Dr. MacCormac, for once, found some difficulty in breath- 
ing. So he opened one of the windows; but on the instant 
some ultra-officious person closed it. Without a moment's 
hesitation the doctor rammed his stick through the glass, 
and told the person in question to "close it now if he 
could." 

The great rejoicings among the local tenantry of 

the Duke of Beaufort over the birth of a son and heir are 
not, we understand, quite a disinterested expression of 
feeling with the house of Somerset. It appears that the 
tenants feared that should Mr. Henry Somerset, who was 
heir-presumptive until the birth of a son, come into the 
estates he would do away with all the public houses on 
the estate, it being presumed that he shared his mother, 
Lady Henry Somerset's strict views on temperance. 

Most everyone who has whiskey for sale compares its virtues to 
ssse Moore "AA" whiskev. 



luuoi everyuue wuu una vvi 

Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey. 



After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Japan- 
ese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnalow's Soothine Syrup " for you 
children while teething. 




How weak 



tin: soap .mil water seems when 

you begin your washing! Yon 

don't get any strength on! 

of it till the work is about 
done Plenty <>t hard work, and 
rubbing and w<-.ir and tear, even 
then — but more of' it at the begin- 
ning; when the water is weakest. 
Now with Pearline, the water is 
just as strong at the beginning as at 
the end. This is one of the reasons (only one) 
why Pearline acts so much better than soap, in 
all washing and cleaning. Use no soap with it. mo 

M///o/?s^ Pear///?e 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Challenge Consolidated Mining ompany. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works — Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby (riven that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 18th day of July, 1900, an assessment, (No. 29) of five (5c) cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 35, third floor Mills building, corner Bush and Montgomery 
streets, San Francisco, Cal 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 21st DAY OF AUGUST, 1900 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 12th day of Septem- 
ber, 1900, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost's of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

C. L. McCOY. Secretary. 

Office— Room 35, third floor, Mills Building, N. E. corner Bush and Mont- 
gomery streets San Francisco Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Con. Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California; location 
of works — Silver Starr Mining District, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held on 
the 14th day of July, 1900, an assessment (No. 35) of Five Cents (5 cents) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately, in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office of the 
company. Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 17th DAY OF AUGUST. 1900. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 11th day of 
September, 1900, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Direotors, 
ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 

Office— Room 69, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery St., San Francisoo. Cal, 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Caribou OH Mining Company, 
Location of principal place of business — San Franciseo, Car. Location of 
works— Coalinga, Fresno County, California. ■ -,< ■ 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the twelfth (12U. ) day .of July, .1900, an assessment. No. 1, often cents 
(10c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at the 
office of the company, room 40, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
15TH DAY OF AUGUST, 1900, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on Tuesday, the 4th day of September, 
1900, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. . 
Office— Room 40. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, Cal. 
ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosl Mining Company. 

Assessment ■ •' No. 56 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied July 19, 1900 

Delinquent in office August 2:*, 1900 

Day of sale of delinquent stock September 12, 1900 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 
Office : Room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgo mery street, San Francisco, Ca l 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the trans- 
action of such other business as may be brought before the meeting, will 
be held at the office of the company, southeast corner of Beale and Howard 
streets, San Francisco, Cal., on 

MONDAY, THE 6th DAY OF AUGUST, 1900. 

at 11 o'clock a.m. L. R. MEAD, Secretary. 

Office— Southeast corner of Beale and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

Weak Men and Women ^^Tu^T^ll\ 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street- San Francisco. Send for circular. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, 1900. 




NOBLESSE OBLIGE, —charlotte perkins stetson- 

Shall 1 not work? 
I, who stand here, in front of human life, 
And feel the push of all the heavy past 
Straining against my hand? Immortal life, 
Eternal, indestructible, the same 
In flower and beast, and savage— now in me— 
Urges, and urges to expression new I 
Work? Shall I take from these blind, laboring years 
Their painful fruit, and not contribute now 
My share of gifts so easy to our lime? 

Shall I receive so much, support the weight 

Of age-long obligation, and not turn 

In sheerest pride and strive to set my mark 

A little past the record made before? 

Shall it be said : "He took from all the world, 

Of its accumulated, countless wealth, 

As much as he could hold and never gave ! 

Spiritless beggar! pauper! parasite I 

Life is not long enough to let me work 

As I desire ; but all the years will hold 

Shall I pour forth. Perhaps it may be mine 

To do some deed was never done before. 

And clear my obligation to the world. 



SOMEWHERE.— julia c r- dorr, in travelers record. 



How can I cease to pray for thee? Somewhere 

In God's great universe thou art to-day : 
Can He not reach thee with His tender care ? 

Can He not hear me when for thee I pray ? 
What matters it to Him who holds within 

The hollow of His hand all worlds, all space, 
That thou art done with earthly pain and sin? 

Somewhere within His ken thou hast a place. 
Somewhere thou livest and hast need of Him ; 

Somewhere thy soul sees higher heights to climb; 
And somewhere still there may be valleys dim 

That thou must pass to reach the bills sublime. 
Then all the more because thou canst not hear 

Poor human words of blessing, will I pray : 
O true, brave heart, God bless thee, wheresoe'er 

In God's great universe thou art to-day. 



THE SECRET CHAMBER.-iv. h- hayne, in independent- 

There is a secret chamber in the soul, 

The audience-room of Conscience— a pure queen 

Whose subjects are all Good and Evil Deeds. 

She sits enthroned above the shifting throng, 

With sinless lips and clear seraphic eyes. 

The Good Deeds come with worshipful while brows, 

And blessed by her their radiant footsteps reach 

Some Land of Promise veiled from mortal view. 

The 111 Deeds enter with defiant steps, 

Clad in the brazen armor they have wrought— 

The armor of their unregretted sins— 

But ere they pass beyond that virgin throne 

Are stricken down with sudden light that streams 

In sun-bright splendor from their sovereign's crown ! 



FATE'S TABLET— john vance cheney, in harper's bazar. 

You must have known her had you seen her face. 
That moment turned away, as by she passed ; 

It must have told yon. that confiding grace, 
Of one could not but love you to the last. 

And had you heard her voice you must have known 
She little talked and softly all that day ; 

Something, perhaps, was on the June wind blown 
To her could not but love you aye and aye. 

You did not see her, and you did not hear, 

She saw not, beard not, you as by she passed ; 

And it was once more written. Year to year 
Two shall go, seeking, seeking to the last. 



BANKING 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, S2.000.000 Surplus. $1,000,000 

Profit and Loss Account. January 1, 1900. 82,321,212 

WTLLIAM ALVORD .President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vlce-PreB't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier 1 I. F. MOULTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— MesBrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs. 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. PariB — Messrs. de Rothschild Preres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit issued available In all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits July 1, 1900, 826.952,875 Reserve Fund 8218.593 

Paid-up Capital 1.000.000 Contingent Fund 439.608 

E. B. POND. President W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin. Jacob 
Barlh, E. B. Pond. 

LoanB upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco. Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m.. and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only. 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cok. Sansome and Suttee Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE, President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager F. L. LEPMAN, Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER. Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 86,250,000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier; Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly. Cashier. 

DntECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldrldge, 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. EJng, George E. Gray, John J. McCook. 

John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital 8300,000 

.1 ames D. Phelan, President S. G. Mdbpht, Vice-President 

Gbobge A. Stoet, Cashier John A. Hoopee, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

D IRE CTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo A Co.. or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82.238.372.45 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000 000 00 

Deposits Jnne 30. 1900 58,938,395.12 

BOARD OF DERECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A H. Muller: General Attorney. W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart, E. Rohte H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N. 
Walter, 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capltal..8l0,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8210,000 
Paid-in-Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100.000 

Its Pubpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make lonns 
on improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent. Interest on their stock 
and allow them to open dei»>Hlt accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St.. San FranclBco, Cal. 

Wh. Cor fun. Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker- Wool Worth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Cornkr Market. Montoomebt and Post Sts. 

Pald-up-Capltal 81,000,000 

Wm. H. Cbockeb, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W. E. Bbown, Vice-President W. Geeoo, Jr., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E Brown, C E, Green. G. W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker, G. W. Soott. 



July Mi 1900. 



SAN PRANCI^O NI-WS II TT!K 



»5 




STOLE* FROM TR1KTBS. 

— "Partkin me," said the polite highwayman, "but I 
must ask you to stand and deliver." The coach stopped. 
The door opened with surprising alacrity, and a young 
woman with a very large hat stepped out into the middle 
of the moonlight. In her hand she held a small leather- 
covered box. "Here tbey are," she said cheerfully. 
"What?" said the highwayman. "My diamonds," said 

the lady. "I am an actress, you know, and " The 

highwayman leaped upon his horse, "Madame," said he, 
removing his hat gracefully, "you must excuse me. I 
may be a highwayman, but I am not a press agent." 

— "Polite society" is often at its wits' end to devise 
means of getting rid of people who are not wanted as 
callers or visitors, but will not take a bint; for polite 
society cannot say in so many words, "I do not want you 
to come again." A French paper repeats this dialogue 
between two ladies: "And you still receive that dreadful 
Madame Comeagain?" "Impossible to get her to take a 
bintl Do you know, the last time she called I never offered 
her a chair." "And what was the result?" "Result? 
Why, the next time she came she brought a folding camp 
stool." 

— A Brooklyn man has a mania for collecting all sorts 
of queer facts in history, science, and so forth, but his 
wife has no sympathy with him in this direction. The 
other evening he laid down his paper. "That's odd," he 
said to her. "What?" she inquired. "The statement 
that it would take 12,000,000 years to pump the sea dry 
at the rate of 1,000 gallons a second. She thought over 
the statement profoundly for a full minute, and then inno- 
cently asked: "Where would they put all the water?" 

— One of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, invalided home, 
was being made much of the other day in a convivial 
hostelry in the Strand. "Sure, Pat," remarked a civilian, 
"'twas an awful bad time you had at Colenso." "Be- 
gorrah it was not," retorted Pat, " 'twas a moighty foine 
time I had." "How so?" inquired the civilian. "Shure, 
now," was the reply, "wasn't I shooting landlords and 
Protestants all the day long, and divil a soul to stop me?" 

— "Don't you miss your husband terribly?" asked the 
young wife of her neighbor, whose lord and master only 
came down to Wave Crest over Sunday. "No, indeed," 
said the older matron. "At breakfast I just stand a news- 
paper up in front of his. place and I quite forget that he 
isn't there." 

— "Huma^ nature is hard to satisfy," said the offhand 
philosopher. "In what way?" "In every way. Take, 
for example, the man who puts on the first straw hat of 
the season. If people make remarks he thinks they are 
impertinent; and if they don't make remarks he resents 
not being noticed." 

— "Hotel rates won't be high at the Philadelphia Con- 
vention, but you'd better not go near Philadelphia for six 
months afterward." "What do you mean?" "Why, the 
town won't get awake to its commercial opportunities 
until the thing is over." 

— "Men are more valuable than women." "What non- 
sense." "It's a fact. Every man has his price, but brides 
are given away." 

How's This! 

Wo oner One Hundred Dollars Reward for any case of Catarrh that cannot 
be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure. 

P. J. CHENEY & Co., Props.. Toledo, O. 

Wo the undersigned, have known F. J. Cheney for the last 15 yours, and 
believe him perfectly honorable in all business transactions and financially 
able to carry out any obligations made by their firm. 
West & Teuax, Wholesale Druggists. Toledo, O. 
Waldtng. Kinnan & Maevin, Wholesale Druggists, Toledo. O. 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, acting directly upon the blood 
and mucous surfaces of the system. Price, 75c. per bottle. Sold by nil 
Druggists. Testimonials free. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



BANKING 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorised Oftpltel. iMOOuOU < *oUal Sub*cr1bed and P.illr Paid, 10.480,000 
IIKM'i.lTli | I |-milx*nl street. Isitidon 
PORTLANI* BRANCH -fhanitar of Commerce Building. 
TAOOMA BRANCH -130H PmUO Avenue. 

Hankers-Hank of England. London Joint Stook Hunk. 1 fin It cd. 



Agents mid Correspondent*: Nrw York- 
Union National Bank. 



J. 1*. Morgan M Co.; ("tin auo 



This hank Is prepared lo grant letters of credit Available In Any part of the 
world And to transact every description of hanking and exchange bOBtMM 

William Mai -kixtosb. Manager. 

Bank of British Columbia 

S. E. cor. Bush and Sansoiuo Sts. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St.. London. 

Capital Paid Up. t3.000.000. Reserve Fund. 1500.000 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver. New Westminster, Kamloops. Nanl- 
amo. Nelson Rowland, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This hank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened eub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon Its 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank: 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico: Socth 
America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and Nrw Zea- 
land— Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it 1b prepared to isBue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Stb. 

Subscribed Capital 82,500.000 Pald-TJp Capital, t2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, $925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank, 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.: -Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. O. ALTSCHTJL, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHTJL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco 
JA8. K. Wilson, President Ww. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co, 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

12 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 81,000,000 Paid-TJp Capital and Reserve, 8375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. O. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. C. Slebe, Albert G. Wieland. H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A, Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-President; H. 
Brunner. Cashier 

The Anglo-Galifornian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86,000,000 Paid Up 8l,5O0,Oot' 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,00f 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STELNHART. P. N. ULIENTHAL. Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



Interest paid on deposits. 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



S. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S, Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutohen 
R. H. Pease 



26 

HORSE AND HORSE. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 21, igoo. 



MISS BELLE H. CLUNY, an 
American variety "artiste," is 
"At Home" in London. The scene 
resembles an Inferno. Lost Souls (in 
livery) wander about with coffee and 
ices. A Tenor is singing; accompanied 
by conversation. 

Miss Belle H. Cluny (who has in- 
vited anybody to bring everybody, to 
broad-shouldered young man in grey 
suit, with grey Fedora hat in hand) — 
Say! I'm real happy to make your 
acquaintance, Captain Leveston. 
Make yourself quite at home, Captain, 
I beg. 

The Man — You're awfully kind, 
but 

Miss Cluny — Why, I should smile! 
It is you who are kind, Captain! (She 
sees her two hundredth dearest friend 
and hurries away.) 

The Man (to himself)— I'm not 
Captain Leveston, confound him! 
Who can the little woman be? Chicago 
twang, or I've lost my sense of hear- 
ing; and the prettiest lips and eyes in 
the room, or I'm a blind nigger! (He 
begins to edge his way towards Miss 
Cluny, quite unconscious of the fact 
that she is his hostess. 

Youth (to a pretty girl) — Talkin' 
of character, you know — readin' it, 
that sort of thing — a fellow I know, 
awf'ly clever fellow, was asked what 
he meant by a good man — er, you 
know — how he would define it. 
"Well," said the fellow I know, "I 
should say that a good man was a 
bad man gone wrong!" It was awf'ly 
good! 

Pretty Girl (with enthusiasm) — 
Yes, that was awf'ly good! (Con- 
tinues smiling — she has white teeth.) 

Lady (to an intimate friend, dis- 
cussing another friend) — Not pretty! 
Oh, she is pretty! 

Friend (softly)— My dear, what you 
can see is paint, and what you can't. 
see is padding. 

Lady — But she is so sweet! 

Friend— Yes 1 — to men! 

Lady — I was at her birthday 
dinner, and she looked so quaintPBut 
she seemed so depressed! 

Friend— Naturally, dear, consider- 
ing the occasion! (In the meantime, 
the broad-shouldered young man has 
followed Miss Belle H. Cluny into the 
shade of a great plant of azaleas.) 

He — At last, after weary pursuit! 

She — You again, Captain! Now, 
hush, Mr. Lorenza is goin' to sing the 
sweetest little song of his own com- 
position. 

He — Have you any idea where Miss 
Belle Cluny is to be found? 

She — Gracious, Captain! (She 
opens her eyes and smiles up at him. 
He murmurs, "Thanks!" Miss Cluny 
sees she is unknown.) 



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BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 



THE ORIGINAL AND GENUINE WORCESTERSHIRE. 

All dishes, such as soups, fish, meats, 
gravy, game, salads etc. are doubly 
appetising and digestible when fla- 
vored with — Lea & Perrins* sauce (j 

Signature _^»^, ,>CJy£.^' a JohnDuncarraSons 
on Every eome. OCJ&&- V ^S&r r ^^uJ Agents-NawYoric. 



He— I have not met her. I have no 
wish to meet her now! But I am not 
Captain Leveston. 

She — Who in creation are you? 

He — My name, sweet saint — Why 
does our hostess allow that man to 
howl? 

She — Say! but his song is cunnin'! 
(Lorenza is murmuriDg an indistinct 
refrain in this style: "Ours, ours! 
The" — mumble — "and showers. The" 
— soft pedal — "bliss! The" — loud 
pedal — "kiss! Ours, ours!") 

He — Pardon me, perhaps you know 
Mr. Lorenza ? A countryman of 
yours? From ? 

She— Shecawgo. 

He — So I thought. 

She — How? 

He — I heard you speak. 

She— Such a terr'ble twang? 

He — Such a sweet voice! But I 
scarcely heard you at all at first. 

She — How was that? 

He — Ah, that brings us to a 
peculiarity of mine. 

She— Wal? 

He — When a musician plays the 
violin I look at his instrument. When 

you spoke to me I looked (She 

pouts). Exactly! 

She— Say, we ought to listen to the 
song. 

He— I never do what I ought. 

She — Then you ought not to talk to 
me? 

He— N— no! 

She— My! Why not? 

He — I ought to hunt for my hostess, 
but somehow Miss Belle H. Cluny 
doesn't draw me. 

She — How's that? 

He — I have heard several of her 
songs. Southern ditties, manufactured 
in Chicago. Darkie dialogue, from 
the pens of gentlemen who have never 
been nearer to Dixie than Union 
Square. 

She — I guess you're acquainted 
with the United States? 

He — Enough to know the difference 
between an Oregon peach and a New 
England pumpkin. 

She — Which am I, from Shecawgo, 
in between? 

He — A flower of Illinois! 

She— My! Isn't that pretty! 

He — Decidedly. (He bows.) 

She— Do you like the States? Or 
are you one of the folks who judge 
Americans by hearsay? 

He — Well, no, I Have you read 

this book? Just out, and fairly well 
reviewed. (He passes her the book 
he has been carrying, entitled "Far 
from Manhattan.") 



She — Say! it has an elegant cover. 

He — You are flattering — to the 
binder! (She turns the leaves care- 
lessly, while he makes a study of 
downcast eyelashes.) 

She— I know I shouldn't like the 
author. 

He (quickly) — May I ask why? 

She — Wal, "Far from Manhattan" 
— I guess he means Noo York City; 
why not say it? "By Harley Dur- 
rant" — I bet that's assoomed. 

He — Why should you think it as- 
sumed? 

She — My friend, I know the kind 
o' man. He has spent one week tear- 
in' through the middle States, and he 
writes a book on the West! He has 
been for a day's excursion to Boston, 
or met a potato-grower from Aroos- 
tock County, and he delivers a stump 
oration on the East! 

He (laughing) — Come, come, you 
are too - severe. 

She — Gracious ! you don't know 
Belle Cluny! 

He — Nor wish to — a note of excla- 
mation from a third-rate variety 
theatre in New York I 

She — Say I you do interest me. 

He — Ah, then when shall I see you 
again? (Drawing nearer). 

She — Are you acquainted with Mrs. 
Lushington? 




HEAD. (Water Colors). Companion Pictures. 
(Slzo 15x20%). 
Copy of one of the premiums given for the return 
of 25 QUEEN LILY SOAP wrappers. 



July tt, 1900. 

Hr— Yes, I am going to her house 
to-morrow uight. Will m be there? 

Shf— Wai, I'm asked. 

He— Then I shall see you? 

She— If you're not too late. 

He— Trust me! 

Sue — Come early and avoid the 
rush. (She smiles. He sees the ap- 
proach of a lady toady. He holds her 
hand for a minute). 

He — A last word. "What's in a 
name?" But s'.ill— one would like to 
know, you know. 

She— Do I play? Then here's a 
trump, and I guess you're euchred. 
(She gives bim her card. He reads 
quickly, "Miss Belle H. Cluny, 
Chicago." She is already seized by 
the toady. He takes out a pencil, 
opens "Far from Manhattan," and 
writes a few words on the fly-leaf). 

He (sotto voce) — When may I plead 
my case in sackcloth and ashes? 

She — To-morrow evening I shall be 
at Mrs. Lushington's — earlyl 

He — How awfully sweet of youl 

She — In the meantime, good-bye. 

He — In the meantime, / play the 
Joker t (He gives her the book, bows 
over her hand, and retires. She reads 
on the fly-leaf, "With the humble ad- 
miration of the Author.") 

She (so'.us) — For — the — land's — 
sake! — Vanity Fair. 



SAX FRANCISCO NI'WS LETTER. 

NEWSPAPERS 

AS HISTORY. 




PRESIDENT Suspender 

That's why they're so comfortable. No suspender I 
Hke them. No suspender that gives any where 
near the ease, comfort and convenience. 
Trimmings will not rust. 

$1500.00 for Estimate8 on Presidential 
vote to wearers of President Suspender. Sold 
everywhere 50 cts., or direct from us. Send for 
handsome booklet "President Pointers." Free, 

C. A. ED6ART0S HFC. CO., Box 241 Shirley, fflass. 



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is interested and should know 
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If your druggist cannot 
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particulars and directions invalu- 
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MARVEL CO. 
Room 21, Times Building, - New York 





« CONTROVERSY is said to have 
arisen between John Fiske and 
Thomas Wentworth Higginson as to 
whether newspaper reports of events 
are of 1 igh value as materials for 
history, Fiske taking the affirmative 
side and Higginson the negative. Of 
course Fiske is correct. He is not 
only a much greater historian than 
his antagonist in this dispute, but is 
a far better authority on a question 
of this kind. Even in these days, when 
the public printing offices of the lead- 
ing European governments and of the 
United States, especially of the 
United States, turnout blue, red and 
yellow books and execute documents 
with a profusion altogether unknown 
in previous ages, the average person 
would have but a vague idea of what 
was going on in his country or in the 
outside world if he were forced to 
rely on these sources for his informa- 
tion. Even the professional historian 
would be hampered if he were res- 
tricted to this particular field for his 
data. 

If, during the excavations by Schlie- 
man on the sites of Troy, Mycenae 
and other Greek cities, he had dug up 
a few newspapers, providing there 
had been any in the old days when 
these towns were in their prime, what 
floods of light they would have thrown 
upon the doings and life of the people 
of their locality in their time. They 
would have told a more vivid tale of 
the customs, passions and ambitions 
of the denizens of those old towns of 
thirty or forty centuries ago than 
was ever imparted by the urns and 
obelisks which have been brought to 
the light. Xenophon has many of the 
qualities of a good reporter. His 
style is direct, gossipy and pictur- 
esque. He makes that 800 or 1000 
miles of the retreat of the Ten Thou- 
sand up the valley of the Tigris to the 
Black Sea familiar ground to modern 
readers. Caesar's simple, pointed 
and concentrated narrative has made 
the campaign in Gaul enact itself over 
again to sixty generations of men. 
Yet if a modern newspaper reporter 
or two had been present with those 
old Greeks and Romans they would 
have thrown side lights on the events 
and conditions which would have re- 
constructed the whole scheme of 
society of those far off days. 

One of the drawbacks to the investi- 
gator into the early history of the 
United States is that there were very 
few newspapers printed in those days, 
and the files of only a small portion of 
them have been preserved. Niles' 
Register, a weekly paper printed in 
Baltimore, which was started in 1811 
and was continued until 1849, the 
younger Niles conducting it after his 
father's death, is the chief reliance 
for the political history of the early 
part of the period which it covered. 
Any one of half a dozen papers printed 
in Baltimore to-day, however, has 
more news in a single issue than Niles 
printed in five or six editions. The 



»7 

newspapers of the present time give 
every event and Issue in all aspects. 
They give it earlier, fuller and in bet- 
ter shape than was done in the past, 
or than can be done by any govern- 
ment publica'ion. They provide the 
"abstract and brief chronicles of the 
time" with an enterprise and a fidelity 
which make them of the highest value 
as a reflex of the life of the period. 
John Fiske speaks for the guild of 
professional historians when be places 
his high estimate upon the worth of 
newspaper narratives as material for 
the history of a nation or an age. 



IT has often been observed that the 
Queen had a great tenderness for 
the memory of Charles I., King and 
Martyr, and all that pertained to him. 
This is. evidenced, says the "Lady," 
by a quaint sheet in black-letter 
that hangs in the great servants' hall 
at Windsor Castle, and is beaded: — 
"Twelve good rules found in the 
study of Charles. I. of blessed 
memory." 

" Profane no divine ordinances." 

" Touch no State matters." 

" Urge no healths." 

" Pick no quarrels." 

" Maintain no ill-opinions." 

'■ Encourage no vice." 

" Repeat no grievances." 

" Reveal no secrets." 

" Make no comparisons." 

" Keep no bad company." 

" Make "no long meals." 

" Lay no wagers." 

" These rules observed will maintain 
Thy peace and everlasting gain." 

— Mistress— Your master has been 
making complaints about you to-day. 
Sail. Housemaid — Very 1 i k e ly, 
ma'am I But I'm more considerate, 
and don't run to you always and tell 
you the complaints he makes to me 
about youl 

— He— And did you see Monte Carlo 
while you were at Nice? She— No ; 
papa called on him, I believe, but from 
his disappointed appearance when he 
returned to the hotel, I think Mr. 
Carlo must have been out. 




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William Wolff 8, co. 

San Francisco, distributors. 

Beware of /mitefions or refitted Botf/es 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 2i, 1900. 



Southern Pacific Co.— Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market Street] 



leave] 



Feom May 13. 1900 



[AEE1VE 



*7 :00 a Benicia.Sulsun, Elm Ira, Vacaville, RumBey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 p 
•7:00 A Shasta Express— Davis, Williams (for Bartlott Sprints). Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff, Portland *7:45 P 

*7:30a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa "6:15 P 

*8:00a Davis, Woodland. Knights Landing. Marysville, Oroville *7:45 p 

•8:00 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East *I1:45 A 

•8:30 A San Jose. LI vermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville, 

Marysville, Chico, Red Bluff. *4:15 P 

•8:30 A Oakdale, Chinese (for Yosemite), Sonora. Carters *4:15 p 

•9:00 a Hay wards. Niles, and way stations *11:45 A 

°9."00a Los Angeles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced and Fresno *6:45 p 

• 9:30 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way Btations *6:45 P 

*10:00 A The Overland Limited— Ogden, Denver, Omaha. Chicago *5:15 p 

*11:0Oa Niles, Livermore, Stockton, Sacramento. Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalla.Porterville °4:15 p 

*12:0Om Haywards, Niles, and way stations *2:45 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers t5 : °0 A 

*3.-00p Haywards, Niles and way stations *5:45 p 

*4:0Op Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga. Santa RoBa *9:15 A 

*4:00p BenJcla, Winters, Sacramento .'Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysville, Oroville *10:45 a 

•4:30p Niles, San Jose, and Stockton *7:15 p 

*5:00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno. Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles *9:45 A 

*5:00p Fresno Passenger — Martinez, Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, 

Berenda (Raymond for Yosemite), Fresno *12:15 p 

•5:30 p New Orleans Express — Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara, Los An- 

geles, Demlng, El Paso, New Orleans, and East *8:45 A 

•530P Santa Fe Route— Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East °6:45 p 

*6:00p Haywards, Niles. and San Jose *7:45 a 

f6:00p Vallejo *12:15 P 

*6:00p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne. Omaha. Chicago *11:45 a 

•6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden. Denver. Omaha. Chicago *4:15 p 

17:00 p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations J9:55 p 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express. Sacramento. Marysville. Red- 
dine, Portland Puget Sound and East *8:15 A 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

t7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa Cruz & Principal Way Stations t8."05p 
°8:15a Newark, CenterviUe. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations *6:20 p 

t2:15p Newark, CenterviUe. San Jose, New Almaden, Felton. Boul- 
der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way Btations tl0:50 a 

*4:15p Newark, San Jose. Los Gatos _ *8:50 A 

Q1:15p Glenwood. Felton. Santa Cruz C8:50a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
a. m., Jl:00,*2:00, J3:00.*4:00, 15:00 and *6 :00 p.m. 

From Oaklabd- Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00. 10:00 A. M.: tl2:00, *1:00 
12:00. *3:00. J4:00. •5:00 P.M. 

Coast DrvisioN (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets ). 

t6:10A Ocean View. South San Francisco t6:30 p 

+7:00a San Joseand way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

17:30 a Sunday Excursion for San Jose, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove 

and Principal Way Stations $8:35 p 

*9:00a San Jose. TresPlnos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove. Paso Robles. 

San Luis Obispo. Surf. Lompoc, and principal waystations *4:10 p 

•10:40 A San Jose and way stations •6:35 a 

•11:30 a San Jose, Los Gatos and way stations *5:30 p 

t2:45p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 

Jose.Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:36 a 

3:30 P San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 

1:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations _ ^9:45 a 

.3;00 p San JoBe, Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations t9.-00 A 

"5:30 p San Joseand Principal Way Stations +835 a 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations Tfi:00 A 

Ml:45p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 



A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

tSundaysonly. 
Q Saturday and Sunday. 



•Daily. t Sundays excepted. 
& Saturdays only. 
<* Sunday and Monday 



The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enqidreof Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m.. for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, July 26, 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. August 21, 1900 

Doeic (via Honolulu) Saturday, September 15. 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, October 10, 1900 

Round Teip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office. No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 




SS " Australia." Wednesday. July 25, 1900. 2 pm. 
S3 "Alameda," Wednesday, Aug. 8, at 8 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Cape town,Soutb 
Airica. 

J. D. SPRECKELS &. BROS CO 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS. 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N. E. corner Eddy and Mason streets, 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco <fc B. Brdn. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DDNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314-316-318 Main St. 
Iron work of every description desiened and constructed. 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners. 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tailers, etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 



Brush Manufacturers. 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco. Tel. 5610 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00.11:00 a.m; 12:35, 3:30. 5:10, 6:30 P. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 P. m . 
SUNDAYS— 8 .-00. 9:30. 11 :00 A. M.; 1:30. 3:30. 5:00. 6:20 p. m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50,9:20,11:10 a. m.: 12:45, 3:40, 5:15 P. M. Saturdays- 
Extra tripB at 1 :55 and 6:.>ip,m, 

SUNDAYS— 8 :10, 9 :40, 11 :10 a . M. ; 1 :40. 3 :40. 5 :05. 6 :25 P. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 



Week days | Sundays 



In Effect April 15, 1900 



Destinations 



Arrive in San Francisco 
Sundays I Week days 



7:30 AH 
3:30 PH 

5:10 PH 



8. -00 AM 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 



Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 



10:40 am 
6:05 pm 
7:35 pm 



8:40 am 

10:25 AM 

6:20 pm 



7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 



Fulton, Windsor. 

Healdsburg. Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 



10 .-25 AM 
620 pm 



7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 1 


Honland. TTfclab 


1 735 PM 


1025 AM 
620 PM 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 


8:00 AM j 
t 


Guerneville 


7:35 pm 


10:25 AM 
6:20 PM 


7:30 AM 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 1 
5:00 PM 1 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


| 9:15 am 
1 6:05 PM 


8:40 am 
620 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 am 1 
5:00 PM 1 


Sebastopol 


1 10:40 AM 
1 735 PM 


1025 AM 
620 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
SpTinjt8;at Fulton for Altruria: at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skates' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay. Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs. 
Blue Lakes. Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake. Pomo. Potter 
Valley, John Day's. Riverside. Lierley's. Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville, Boone vi lie, Philo, Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whltes- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, 
Westport, Usal Wllllts, Laytonville, Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris. Ol- 
sen's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf. San Francisco. 

^^^ For Alaskan porta. 11 a. m.: July 5, 10. 15, 20. 25, 30. 

^B^P^__ August 1, change to company's steamers atSeattle. 

i^^Ar^fct ForB.C.andPugetSoundPorta. ll A. M., July 5.10, 15- 

JnJBjjM L *"" 25 ' 3 °* AuB:u8t 4 ' and every fifth day thereafter. 

0|C)g|| For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. M.,July 2. 7, 12, 17,22. 

r^^^^^K 27, August 1, and every fifth day thereafter. 

^^^^ For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports. 9 A. M„ 
July 2. 6. 10, 11, 18, 22. 2(1, 30, August 3. and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford (San Luis Obispo). Santa 
Barbara, Port Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles] 11 A. M., Julv i. 9, 
12. 16. 20. 2-1. 28. August 1. and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Mexican ports, 10 a M., 7th of each month. 

Forfurtherinformation obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers. Bailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

GO0OALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts.. 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

Only railway owning Its own tracks between San Pnuudaa 
and Chicago, 2550 miles. Personally conducted excur- 
sions in Pullman Tourist Sleeping Curs, three limes every 
week to Kansas City, Chicago, and all points Kant. Qel 
handsome folders, rates and full information at 628 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. 




/Vw» jm mpf 10 mil. 




eSTABLISMED JULY 80. toS« 

tM l FRANCIS 











Ko/. ZJ/ 



SXtf FRANCISCO, JULY 28, 1900. 



Number 5. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
6H Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Fost- 
ofllcc as Second-class Matter. 

The office of the S. F. NEWS LETTER In London. Eng.. Is at 10 Leaden- 
hall Bide. No. 1 I^cadenhall street, ■ Fre<l. A. Marriott. Representative) 
where information may be obtained rctrardine subscriptions and 
advertising rates. Paris. France. Office. No. 37 Avenue de L'Opcra. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising, or other matte r. Intended for 
publication In the current number of the NEWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 



'HE man out of a job bas no need of going to Alaska. 
He can remain out right here. 



TO see the Bar Association in a state of activity would 
afford the public a pleasant spectacle. 

CHINESE Minister Wu talks much, but never so far 
forgets himself as to say what he thinks. 

BOGUS telegrams figure extensively in yellow journal- 
ism, but in diplomacy they lack effectiveness. 

THERE is every indication that China's censor per- 
forms the duties of his office with an axe. 

ITH all his faults, the average actor shows to better 
advantage on the stage than in the police court. 



W 



WHILE the Supervisors have been inspecting Tahoe, 
the fact remains that as judges of water they are 
not regarded as at their best. 

THERE seems no doubt but the man who cabled that 
Seymour killed the wounded is a liar. Other facts 
concerning the Chinese situation are scarce. 

SOME Republicans show a tendency to kick against 
their "saloon bosses," but they will be around later 
with a declaration that they never said it. 



SUPERVISORS of Lake County will exclude the Bel- 
gian hare. It is just as well to abate a nuisance 
while this can be done without offering a bounty. 

REV. John Hemphill announces that the trouble in China 
is due, not to the missionaries, but to diplomats; 
which for a man in the pulpit is a comfortable belief. 

ft CERTAIN preacher has pronounced a certain actress 
one of the world's greatest beauties and greatest dan- 
gers. Neither allegation is true, but each will please the 
actress. 

LADY Churchill's determination to marry seems so en- 
tirely her own affair, and that of the gentleman se- 
lected, that the fuss about it must be ascribed to scandal- 
mongers. 

IT is peculiar that the sympathy of Colma should be with 
the prowling assassins, who recently committed a 
double murder there. Apparently the conscience of Colma 
is on a drunk. 

THE gentleman rescued last Sunday from Mussel rock 
cannot glance at the newspaper pictures of the epi- 
sode "without at least a shade of regret that the gr.eat 
deep was not permitted to keep its grip on him. 

DURING the latest week of Filipino peace, officially 
reported, two hundred Tagals were killed and twelve 
Americans. The future historian may decide upon the 
fairness of this ratio, but at present the country is too 
busy thinking about more serious things. 



THE Reverend John Hemphill, who sees God in the 
Chinese uprising, may claim rank as an imaginative 
genius of the highest order. This is the way he proposes 
to fix things: "We want to see carnage stopped and 
China regenerated. How this is to be done I do not know. 
God knows, and I see God in the Chinese uprising." 

THIS Chinese business seems to have deprived the Sun- 
day editors of this city of their last remaining frag- 
ment of decency. Why is it necessary to illustrate, in the 
minutest detail, every possible or impossible form of tor- 
ture which the fiendish ingenuity of the Chinese can de- 
vise? We don't want nightmares served up for breakfast 
every morning. 

THE suggestion that ill-feeling existed between the 
American and British soldiers now fighting side by 
side in China, was one of the most despicable ever made by 
a lying press. The accounts of the battle of Tien-Tsin do 
not bear it out in the least, and when so many valuable 
lives are at stake, the voice of slander should be silenced, 
by force if needs be. 

THE present is not an auspicious time for the local Chi- 
nese to make formal protest against the police for 
having disturbed their fan-tan games. The Chinese have 
no more right than white people to maintain gambling 
places. Long immunity has given them a false notion, 
and their indignation at being forced to comply with the 
law is in bad taste. 

POLICEMAN Calnan, guardian of the public peace and 
morals, turns out to be a horse-thief. Evidently Mr. 
Calnan was so busy watching his neighbors that he over- 
looked the necessities of his own case, a clear instance of 
self-abnegation. Calnan has vanished, and is probably 
outside the city, which destroys his jurisdiction and will 
prevent him from arresting himself should he chance to 
awaken to a sense of duty. 

NOW comes Creelman, the champion prevaricator, and 
warns us against allowing Japan to subjugate the re- 
bellious Chinese hordes. He argues that the Jap is very 
little better than the Chinaman, and quotes the battle of 
Port Arthur as an example of the little brown man's sav- 
agery. All this may be perfectly true, but what we want 
just now is not argument, but action, and plenty of it. If 
the Jap is the most convenient tool at hand, let us use him 
and talk about his merits afterwards. 

THE Al British ship Afghanistan commenced loading 
canned fruit for England on Wednesday of this week. 
This is the first ship to take California products of the sea- 
son of 1900, and as usual the largest shipments are being 
made by the Californian Canneries Company, Limited, who 
were the heaviest exporters of canned fruit last year. In 
this regard we note by the Grocer and Country Merchant 
that when prices were opened for the season of 1900 by the 
California Fruit Canners' Association, which controls 
nearly eighty-five per cent, of the business of this State, 
the Californian Canneries Company, Limited, met their 
figures, and in three days practically disposed of their en- 
tire prospective output, which is said to be the most 
phenomenal sale of canned fruits ever made by one can- 
nery in the history of the industry in a like period of time. 
The sale approximated over five million cans, and forced 
the Californian Canneries Company, Limited, to withdraw 
their prices from the market. The principal brand 
purchased was the Bear brand, which now stands the 
highest in the various markets of the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1900. 



SHALL WE HAVE TO RECONSIDER OUR PARK PLANS? 

VERY little is heard nowadays about the Park Pan- 
handle, or of the four million loan which was authorized 
for its construction. A year ago the necessity of the 
scheme was on every tongue; San Francisco was held to 
be over-crowded by reason of the lack of breathiDg places, 
and until it obtained a grand boulevard and more adorn- 
ments, was utterly unworthy of its boast of beiDg "the 
Queen City of the Pacific." It would never do to forfeit 
that proud claim, and the people forthwith voted four 
millions to make good our title to it. But, alasl a change 
seems to come over the spirit of that dream. Nothing 
more is heard about it, or of the much needed new hospital, 
and even the money to pay for St. Mary's Park has gone 
into that sink hole known as the "general fund." Why is 
all this? Is there a suspicion lurking in the minds of ex- 
perts that we were about to start before we were ready, 
and that a better plan of improvements yet remains to be 
pointed out? Our Merchants Association seems to think 
so, for it prints in the current number of its Monthly Re- 
view an able article by George Hansen entitled "A Park 
System for San Francisco." It is worthy of all considera- 
tion, because it is no half-way makeshift, but marks out 
a comprehensive scheme along which improvements may 
be conducted from time to time, as funds ar6 available, 
and in the end reaches a degree of perfection worthy of 
the great future of our city. As a first point of import- 
ance in planning new parks and boulevards, Mr. Hansen 
directs attention to the lack of direct and convenient 
communication between different sections of the municipal- 
ity. He says: Market street should have turned into 
Mission at Eighth, thence into San Jose avenue and should 
have widened into a grand boulevard southward through 
San Mateo County. Instead of that, the latter avenue 
narrows at one place into a thoroughfare of only sixty 
feet in width. Montgomery avenue should have ended at 
the Ferry building. The now proposed widening of 
Washington street will be as much of a make-shift as the 
unfortunate cut through Second street. For the purpose 
of serving the double benefits of parks and broad avenues, 
it is suggested that a Park area should be provided for 
the district South of Mission street on lines similar to the 
proposed pan-handle. For the rest, Mr. Hansen would 
have the city save as parks all the commanding and 
picturesque sites within its borders. Every knoll of pro- 
mise, every piece of ground expensive to build upon, 
should be set aside as a reservation. A grand boulevard 
should follow the contours of Islais Creek, with its grand 
succession of noble outlines, and give the city a good 
drive-way into San Mateo County. , Mr. Hansen makes 
many more recommendations for which we have not space. 
His article should be read by everybody. 

THE DIPLOMACY OF CHINA IS BEATING THE WORLD. 

IT is just six weeks since the first news came of the 
slaughter of the foreign ministers in Peking. Ever 
since then the civilized world has been in that worst of all 
agonies — the torture of doubt. It has been a time of chills 
and fever alternating with hope and dread, such as is 
without precedent in history. We cannot conceive why 
the agony is so long drawn out. Peking is but seventy- 
five miles from the sea coast, and has river and rail com- 
munication from Tien Tsin. Yet in all that time the allied 
forces of the great powers have not advanced one yard 
towards the relief of their ministers in Peking. All the 
envoys of Christendom have been in peril, and have prob- 
ably been murdered, and yet we know not their fate to 
this hour. 

Alarm began to be felt for the legations on June 13, 
when the rumor came of the murder of the German 
minister and menaces toward the legations. On the 16th 
it was reported that a mob was in the city, and that the 
foreigners were imprisoned in the legations. On the 17th 
came a report from Hong Kong that the legations had 
been destroyed, but this was promptly denied on the 18th. 
It was hoped that Seymour's force was by this time in 
Peking, but on the 19 th came the disappointing news that 
he was in retreat. But on the 20th it was confidently 
said that the Russians were in Peking, andthatonly three 
ministers had been killed. On the 21st assurance was given 
that Seymour was at Peking, and that the legations were 
safe. On the 22nd it was at once hoped that the worst 



was over and that the worst had happened — two very 
different things. From that date to this a see-saw of 
rumors has been kept up all originating from Chinese 
sources, and apparently without any basis of fact. 

On July 7th Shanghai sent word: "Prepare for the 
worst," and the world gave up hope. On the 8th Shanghai 
reported that all the foreigners had been massacred. On 
the 9th, Sheng, director of telegraphs and railroads, and 
therefore possessing superior facilities for getting the 
news, came cheerily to the front, as the dispenser of 
official and trustworthy despatches. All the legations he 
said were safe on the 4th of July. Hope went up at 
Washington, which all through this business has been un- 
duly optimistic and ready to catch at straws. On the 12th 
the situation was declared to be "most ominous." Then 
the Chinese gave out a complicated document by way of 
justification, which "gave great satisfaction at Washing- 
ton," but which to others seemed but a thin veil to tem- 
porarily hide the shocking events at Peking. 

More recently the very cunning Chinese Minister at 
Washington offered to produce our Minister, Mr. Conger, 
at Tien-Tsin. Nothing was said about the delivery of his 
family, or whether he and they were to be held as hos- 
tages. Washington was only too delighted to know that 
its Minister could be "produced," although it only had that 
on the word of a tricky Chinese. But now comes that wily 
old rascal Li Hung Chang who begins to show his hand. 
When he was at Hongkong and liable to arrest his sole 
purpose in going to Peking was to restore order and 
rescue the foreigners. Now that he is on Chinese soil he 
repudiates Minister Wu's offer to produce Mr. Conger, 
and declares that the foreign Ministers can only be de- 
livered up on certain terms. 

The Western powers must abandon all their concessions 
in China, bind themselves to protect the empire from dis- 
memberment, pay for the damage done in this war and 
withdraw all missionaries. These things might, or might 
not, have been discussed in ordinary times, but they are 
not to be so much as, listened to whilst our Ministers re- 
main unaccounted for. No self-respecting nation yields 
to menace of that kind. We do not believe that any for- 
eigners are left alive in Peking, and if there are they will 
suffer none the worse because of the on-coming of an army 
strong enough to lay Peking in ashes. The powers made 
a big mistake at the outset in not telling the Chinese what 
would ultimately come to them if so much as a hostile fin- 
ger was laid on the legations. 



AN OBJECT LESSON FOR MILLIONAIRES. 

ONCE in a long time something is done in San Fran- 
cisco to make us all sit up and take notice and realize 
that we are entering a new century of progress and en- 
terprise. Frequently this is done by Claus Spreckels, the 
most public-spirited and solid-minded of all our million- 
aires. The latest instance is the Independent Electric 
Light and Power Company, organized by Claus Spreckels 
and representing an invested capital of $2,500,000. In a 
few days this company will be supplying the electric fluid 
to all in San Francisco who want it. The San Mateo Rail- 
way and the Pacific Rolling Mills will be operated by elec- 
tricity generated at the new plant, and any number of 
shops that require power will be accommodated; for the 
aim of the new organization is not only to light the city, 
but to furnish the life for a great deal of its machinery. 
The new works is located a short walk beyond the Union 
Iron Works. A great brick structure houses the four 
large and two small engines, which are models in modern 
mechanism. Every piece of machinery in the building is 
duplicated, so that there is no possibility of a general 
breakdown at any time. Where, say, two engines are 
in constant use, a third is in position and always ready 
for an emergency. 8,500 horse power is the present 
capacity, but the plans of construction were so ar- 
ranged that the amount of machinery and the size of 
buildings may be increased whenever occasion shall re- 
quire. Three of the engines have a capacity of 2500 horse 
power each, and with a smaller one of 750 horse power 
may be raised to a total of 12,000 without a strain. Eight 
huge boilers of 550 horse power each supply the steam. 
Until the new coal bunkers, with a capacity of 3,000 tons, 
are erected petroleum is being used for fuel. A novel de- 



July 28, 1900 



BAN f KANCISOO NEWS LETTF.H. 



vice will feed the furnaces with coal automatic- 
ally. There are four main cables from the plant 
that usher the fluid into the network of the 
city proper, and the highest underground pressure 
on record is attained. The highest so far has been in 
Brooklyn, N. Y 7,600 volts. The underground pressure 
of the Independent will be 11,000 volts. A novel feature is 

»tbat in case of a break in any of the lines the break is self 
registered at the power house and a small portion, not the 
entire length of that circuit, cut off. The sub-stations are 
so arranged as to keep all the wires in a more or less in- 
dependent state. A. M. Hunt, the manager of the com- 
pany, is responsible for the admirable construction of the 
new system. He already occupies a high position among 
the mechanical engineers of America, but this new 
achievement brings him new honors. The work was com- 
menced only on the first day of December of last year, and 
to-day it is practically completed. The city has been 
wired from end to end. There are a few pole lines, but the 
greater part of the system is underground, the wires laid 
in terra cotta conduits embedded in cement, and built to 
last for generations. On every block is a manhole of 
brick, cement and iron that will do away with tearing up 
the street when new connections are made from time to 
time. And speaking of tearing up the streets, it is a mat- 
ter of note that the Independent Electric Light and Power 
Company is the first corporation that has completed its 
work so as to leave the streets in as good if not better 
condition than they were before. 

In years to come this system will stand as one of the 
monuments to the grit and enterprise of Claus Spreckels. 
He is about the only man in San Francisco who is doing 
something to actually build up the city. A liberal citizen 
of large capital and good judgment, he invests his money 
at home, to the profit of San Francisco as well as of him- 
self and his associates. Every enterprise with which he 
has been connected has been a success; and there is about 
all of them a stability that is impeccable. The Spreckels 
Sugar Refinery, the Spreckels Building, the Spreckels 
residence are in their separate kind the best we have. 
Claus Spreckels is a good object lesson for his brother 
millionaires. If the other capitalists had something of a 
Spreckels confidence in the town, and backed it up as he 
does, there would be a possibility of San Francisco coming 
up some day for a close comparison with New York and 
Chicago. 

REFORM THE PILOT SERVICE. 

THE sensational finish of the pilot boat Bonita, whilst 
cruising in company with a whale off the Farallones, 
suggests that the time is ripe for a much needed reform 
in our pilot service. As conducted at present, the ser- 
vice, like all other affairs managed by the State, is ab- 
surdly wasteful and expensive. Consequently the rate of 
pilotage charged foreign-going vessels is excessively high 
and constitutes an unfair handicap on the trade of the 
port, which is already one of the most expensive in the 
world to visit. No one grudges the pilots a fair remunera- 
tion for their services, especially as their occupation is at 
all times trying and often dangerous; but as they draw 
down something like $3000 a year each, it will be seen 
that they are not much in need of commiseration. How- 
ever, without reducing the pilots' salaries at all, there is 
one obvious way by which the pilotage rates could be ma- 
terially lessened. There are, or rather were, four pilot 
boats in commission, the America, the Gracie S, the Lady 
Mine, and the late lamented Bonita. Each of these ves- 
sels is to all intents and purposes a superb cruising yacht, 
fitted up in the most luxurious style and built at a cost of 
over $20,000. Each requires a well-paid crew of five 
men, and each has to be maintained in first-class sea-going 
order at a heavy expense. There must be no scrimping 
in the outfit of a pilot boat, for heavy weather has often 
to be faced, and many valuable lives are at stake. Con- 
sequently a large proportion of the pilotage rates goes to 
keep these vessels in commission, whilst the work could be 
done equally well by one small, handy, fast steamer. Such 
a vessel would cost little more to build than one of the 
present sailing boats, and she could be run at but little 
more expense. Why not sell the pilot boats— they would 
be eagerly bought up byyachtsmen— and build one steamer 
to do the work of four sailors? In fine weather the steamer 



could He outside, near the lightship, whilst whpn storm* 
came she could seek shelter under the heads, ready to 
sally forth at a moment's notice when signalled for. In 
either vould get her pilots onboard quicker than 

is now done, whilst the saving would be enormous. This 
plan has been adopted at New York. I'nrt lackson, and 
at many other leading harbors of the world, and there is 
no reason why San Francisco should be behind-hand in the 
reorganization of her pilot service. 



LAW FAILURES AND THE USE OF TRUST MONEY. 

IT is not often that we hear of lawyers taking the benefit 
of the Bankruptcy act. Either "creditors think it use- 
less to push them to extremes, or their business is too 
profitable to render legal repudiation necessary. How- 
ever that may be, it is certain that a very extraordinary 
run of bankruptcies has taken place among the legal 
fraternity of London, England. It is not thought to be due, 
however, to losses in legitimate professional work. Stock 
jobbing and company floating are at the bottom of the 
many financial failures of the period. The average law- 
yer can manage such enterprises no better than other 
people, and seldom as well. In view of the fact that they 
often act as trustees for others, and are guardians of 
money not their own, there is a good reason why they 
should not engage in outside speculations. Should a pinch 
come, the temptation is too great, and they are liable to 
find themselves embezzlers and inmates of a felloe's cell. 
Their occupation is gone, and on all this earth there is no 
more hopeless creature than a disbarred lawyer. There 
have been some half dozen legal failures in London within 
a few years for large sums, and in nearly every case 
trust funds have been used. The most notorious of these is 
that of Benjamin Greene Lake, of 10 New Square, Lincoln's 
Inn. His liabilities areset down at $1,500,000, and are likely 
to exceed that sum. Mr. Lake was formerly a mem- 
ber of the council and President of the Incorporated Law 
Society, and was a member of the Discipline Committee 
acting under a Parliamentary statute. In that capacity 
Lake had enormous powers in the direction of dealing out 
punishment to dishonest and misbehaving lawyers — the 
power, indeed, of their professional life and death. And 
all this while acting as the guide of his professional breth- 
ren. This failure was due to the investment of his clients' 
money in the Kent coal fields. Among the noted failures 
were: Parkers, of Bedford-row, who failed some years ago 
for £300,000; Joseph Dodds, M. P. for Stockton-on-Tees, 
for a very large amount; Mr. Wynne, of Lincoln's-inn-fields, 
for a quarter of a million; Messrs. Ingram, Harrison & 
Co., of Lincoln's-inn-fields, for £600,000; and Messrs. Ar- 
nold, Sismey &Co., of Lincoln's-inn-fields, for £360,000. An 
attempt is now being made to have this man Arnold, of 
Arnold, Sismey & Co., extradited from this State. We 
do not believe in using the law to collect debts, but the 
law-makers ought to pass laws protecting clients from at- 
torneys using money to their own benefits. 



THE PREVENTION OF VICE. 

THERE seems to be between Judge Conlan and Frank 
Kane, professional discourager of vice, a warmth of 
disregard. As to the merits of the precise controversy, 
the Crier knows nothing, having no means of learning 
save through the daily press. But if Kane is not rotten 
to the core, if he does not thrive on degradation, if he 
does not fatten his ribs from the tribute of the erring, he 
differs from all his kind. Some good men may launch upon 
this highly moral task, but tbey never stay good. There 
is something about the corruption of their environment 
that soaks into them. They become sneaks, compounders 
of felony, participants in crime, usually they are black- 
mailers. The memory of Secretary Bennet is still green, al- 
though he went, too tardily, to San Quentin. He was a 
thief, procurer, seducer, slanderer, all that was vile. An 
indignant father sought to kill him, and there was no 
regret, save that the father was a poor shot. An agent 
for the prevention of vice generally needs a large dose of 
prevention himself. All this says nothing against Kane. 
He may be an angel of light. But if he is he has now an 
opportunity to ask Judge Conlan for an apology for the 
epithet "Blackmailing scoundrel." He can't be both of 
these things, and his status should be determined. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 



MUCH SMOKE THAT INDICATES SOME FIRE. 

THERE are three probate departments to the present 
Superior Court of this city and county. Up to a re- 
cent period one sufficed to do the whole business with 
economy and despatch. Appeals, of course, were fre- 
quently taken by lawyers anxious for the largest possible 
fees, but they invariably failed. The Probate Judge was 
known to be incorruptible, as true in his guardianship of 
dead men's estates as if they were bis own, and possessed 
of courage enough to stand off a class of lawyers who 
hover around an intestate estate as cormorants do around 
a dead carcass. Iu process of time it was given out that 
this righteous judge was being overworked, although he 
himself had made no complaints on that score. The busi- 
ness was divided up, and of course only the routine work 
was "assigned" to the regular probate department, 
whilst all the "soft snaps" went just where almost any man 
would have guessed they would go. Things sailed along 
smoothly for a time; the cormorant lawvers looted estates 
as in the halcyon days of '56, when the Vigilantes changed 
things, and there seemed nobody to say them nay. Their 
Honors appeared as quiescent and as acquiescent as if they 
did not know of the eternal vigilance of their colleague, or 
of the snap and vim with which he smote every hand that 
endeavored to grab pelf and plunder through his court. 
But their ominous quiet could not, in the nature of things, 
last long. The crowds around them were too eager and 
too hungry to take the good things the gods had sent 
them in peace and contentment. The cormorants began 
to quarrel over the division of the spoils. Things were 
made smoother for some men than others. Chretien, with- 
out a rag of character to hide his moral deformities, is 
appointed administrator in behalf of a bogus heir, know- 
ing him to be so, and they and their pals proceed to divide 
the estate. Chretien has confessed the facts, but has not 
told us how he came by his "pull." Further examination 
shows that all the appraisements under the inheritance 
laws are allotted by the Judge to his former p artner and 
law clerk. Again, it appears that a man's estate has 
been administered to who is not yet dead, but was simply 
out of the way. These are shocking scandals, about which 
more has yet to be learned. Extreme efforts are being 
put forth to hush up matters, with not a little prospect 
of success. 



POST CHECK MONEY. 

SMALL remittances are the life and soul of the trade 
of to-day. They are specially needed by newspapers, 
magazines, book publishers, advertising tradesmen, manu- 
facturers, merchants, farmers, and by private citizens 
who want to make payment for small orders. The present 
Postoffice money order system does not fill the bill. Jt is 
both inconvenient and costly. The present method of be- 
ing compelled to make a journey to the Postoffice, is a 
serious embargo, represented by small sums. The time to 
close a business transaction is when the buyer is in the 
mind. If he has to wait until he can make a troublesome 
visit to the Postoffice and endure probably "a standing in 
line" until his turn comes, often consuming more time than 
the sum he intends to send is worth, he is pretty likely to 
refrain from making his desired purchase. Business 
houses at present receive large sums in the aggregate in 
stamps, silver coin, and .'mall checks on inland banks 
(costing from 10 cents to 25 cents to collect). One large 
Chicago publisher reports the receipts of upwards of 
1350,000 a year in postage stamps alone; about $1,000 a 
day. Two commercial houses report daily receipts of 
$15,000 in small sums, most of which consists of stamps, 
silver, small checks, and paper money, none of which 
yield the government a fee. A strong movement is now on 
foot in the East to remedy all this. It is proposed to re- 
tire $50,000,000 of the currency now afloat, by the issu- 
ance of other paper money in denominations of 5, 10, 15, 
25 and 50 cents. This fractional currency is to pass cur- 
rent from hand, when two blank spaces are left unfilled. 
When, however, it is desired to convey the face amount of 
the note to a distance, the name and address of the payer 
are filled in, a one cent stamp added and the note is forth- 
with ready to be mailed. The Postoffice authorities favor 
the plan. 



MR. BRYAN AND HIS RUNNING MATE. 

MR. ADLAI STEVENSON, the Democratic candidate 
for Vice-President, enters the campaign as badly 
handicapped as bis chief. Bryan went to Washington, 
importuned bis followers to vote for the ratification of the 
Treaty of Paris and thereby rendered the imperialistic 
policy possible. The treaty was only ratified by a majority 
of three, although, through Mr. Bryan's influence seven- 
teen Democrats who were opposed to it, voted in its favor 
in order to keep it alive as an issue in the Presidential 
election. Imperialism could have been killed then but 
candidate Bryan would not have it so. He preferred to 
risk his country's good, rather than not make a point for 
election purposes. If there be one man more responsible 
than another for the taking over of the Philippines, and 
for all that has happened in connection therewith, that 
man is William Jennings Bryan. Yet he now comes up 
smiling and declares anti-imperialism to be the "para- 
mount issue" now before the people, as no doubt it is, but 
only because of his action in infusing life into it when it was 
as good as dead. Such disingenuous politics are unworthy 
the respect of honest men. And now comes Adlai Steven- 
son, and appears in an almost equally despicable plight. 
A candidate on an anti-trust platform, bs is himself a 
stockholder, and was a director in one of the most object- 
ionable trusts in the country. The North American 
Trust Company has had a remarkable career because of 
the many questionable favors vouchsafed to it by the 
government. It is the administration's depository in 
Cuba, among other places and not long ago the Democrats 
tried to make a case against it because it had received 
larger subsidies than it had earned. Mr. Stevenson was 
a Director, and still holds stock enough to qualify him to 
be elected a director again. Clearly the two candidates 
have but a shaky footing on their own chosen ground. 
Perhaps this is the reason why Mr. Stevenson is not go- 
ing to make speeches during the campaign, and that Mr. 
Bryan is not going to talk in parts of the country where 
these things are understood. Both should receive a good 
ear-wigging on the stump before the campaign is over. 

A GIGANTIC CORPORATION. 

IT appears that all the telephones, telegraphs, and cables 
in this country are being organized into a gigantic 
trust or combination, that will exclude the possibility of 
competition, except by the government. The National 
Telephone and Telegraph Company is a $50,000,000 cor- 
poration formed in New Jersey, by the Whitney-Widener- 
Elkins syndicate, with a charter allowing it to do business 
anywhere on the globe. The incorporator's plans include 
an amalgamation with the Western Union, the Postal 
Telegraph, and the Commercial Cable Companies, and they 
expect to cover the whole telephone and telegraph field in 
the United States, Cuba, Porto Rico, and the Philippines. 
No charters are to be granted to foreign companies. An 
inveterate war is to be maintained, it is said, against the 
Bell telephone interest, and they propose to either drive 
that company out of business, or to compel it to consent 
to absorption. It is as yet impossible to obtain exact in- 
formation on this head, but the launchers of the new com- 
bination do not deny that such a consummation is planned. 
New Jersey has been, as is her wont, most complacent in 
this matter. In the first instance, a quiet effort was 
made to obtain a law from the New York Legislature 
permitting the State's jurisdiction to extend over tele- 
phones and telegraphs operated beyond the State's borders, 
but, it is said, that votes were marked up too high, and 
that business was done on more reasonable terms in New 
Jersey, and an amended law was obtained enabling a 
company chartered in that State to carry its telephone 
and telegraph service to any part of the world. The 
main offices of the new combination will be in New York, 
and it is understood that Joseph B. McCall, now secretary 
of the Electric Company of America, will be elected presi- 
dent. That ends telegraphic competition in this country 
and will give rise to a new agitation for government 
ownership and control. What England has done this 
country can do. A postal telegraph service, at greatly 
cheapened rates, is bound to come sooner or later. 

Afteh twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Japan- 
ese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



Jaly a8, 1900 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



PRIVATE HOME OR. HOTEL 
for YOUNG MARRIED FOLK. 



By REGINALD SCHUYLER. 

IN writing to me he says that he Is young and married 
to a handsome young woman. They have been married 
about a year, living in hotels and boarding houses. ''Do 
you, sir, " he asks, "think that a hotel or a boarding bouse 
is the right sort of place in which to bring up a bride. 
My wife's mother died years ago and the child, the only 
child, was cared for by her father, who had the club habit 
and fancied hotel life; hence she has had no experience in 
real home life and domesticity. It was on that account I 
consented to live in a hotel. I would be much happier in a 
small home of my own and I think she could learn to like 
it. But as things are now my wife says she will not spend 
whole days by herself while I am at the office. She says 
that in the big boarding house where we now live there 
are many persons more or less congenial to her. Another 
point is, that it costs much more for a woman's dress in a 
boarding bouse or hotel. My wife is miserable unless she 
is as well gowned as the next woman, and she insists that 
I dress for dinner every night, which is often a nuisance 
when a man is tired and doesn't care a rap how he looks." 
Now this, dear reader, is a ticklish problem to solve, 
especially in San Francisco, which has been not unaptly 
described as a city of boarding houses. The boarding 
bouse or the hotel is the one place where a man may have 
a home that is anybody's castle but his own. If he be an 
easy going, sociable cbap he will get along all right, even 
with a pretty wife to be entertained in his absence. He 
will not have the privacy that would be his in his own 
establishment, but on the other hand he will have plenty 
of fellowship of the casual kind. He will meet with women 
and men who are only too willing to help him out in 
murdering the hours of indolence and rest. So will his 
wife. And there's the rub. 

We Americans give our wives all sorts of liberty, but 
we are a jealous men just the same. It will require sev- 
eral generations more before we permit our women folk 
to entertain and be entertained by their men favorites, as 
is the custom in the older countries. The American is by 
nature and breeding a humorous cuss: he knows enough 
about a joke to fear one on himself. And it is a matter of 
tradition and fact the world over that nothing is quite so 
ridiculous as an "injured" husband. He seems to get no- 
body's sympathy but his own. Directly his predicament 
is discovered, he becomes a farce-comedy character for 
friend and foe alike. Such is life at the tail end of a new- 
movement century. 

After a little study of my correspondent's letter I am 
come to the conclusion that he is a victim of the yellow 
imp of jealousy. He resents the fact that his wife finds 
ways to enjoy herself while he is at work and away from 
home. He would have her stowed away in a suburban 
flat, with an apprentice maid of all work and a gas stove; 
wearing flannel wrappers all day long and lending a hand 
to the ordering and cooking of his dinner. And that's 
where his dear sir makes a mistake. A woman does not 
marry to swear-off all the fun and beauty there are in ex- 
istence. She demands entertainment before as well as 
after marriage, and I think she ought to have it. If you 
are a heavy swell, with a swollen income, and can afford 
to keep up an establishment with all the modern comforts 
and permit your wife to entertain by day as well as 
by night, then by all means avoid boarding-houses and 
hotels, except when you are traveling. But on the 
other hand, if you are a man of limited means and 
still would mingle with the modish world, eat three 
square meals a day, and have some several dollars left for 
clothes— well, then, "board out." Your wife's conduct 
will take care of itself. The day in which you could lock 
her up in a tower has passed. Let her meet men as she 
would meet women, on terms of equal frankness and cor- 
diality. A ttend to your own dignity by not being jealous, 
by wearing your despised evening garments at dinner and 
to the play^ and she, too, will attend to your dignity. 
There is no reason why you should become a sloven and a 
bluebeard and a boor just because the girl has married 



you. Remember that she is not as serious about a great 
many things— your work particularly— as you are; that 
she still has the laughing spirit of girlhood in her, that 
she likes to be admired; and would joy to see you ad 
mired. I think a man of good sense can be quite happy 
with his own wife in a hotel. 

And never use force, except for one thing. Don't per- 
mit your wife to gossip in your presence. Every hotel 
has its raft of scandal-mongers, and every bride with the 
blood of woman in her is susceptible to their taint. Don't 
let her scandalize in your presence; scorn it, ridicule it, 
protest against it— and then, if she be the right girl, she 
will put her natural womanhood above her curiosity and 
spite, and come around to your way of thinking. 

The question is not "Shall we live in a hotel?" but "Can 
we afford not to?" 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 




Thasurelr 
Wand 



CJeoityn 



deolcy no tvand but Pleasure's. 

— TvmStoe 



THE freak play of the year is. Ilis Excellency, the Gov- 
ernor, a more than up-to-date EDglish farce by R. 
Marshal], which Mr. Miller's players have been presenting 
at the Columbia this week. It is a sort of a puzzle piece 
in that no one seems sure whether it is a satire, a howling 
farce, or what. Certainly it is anything but serious, and 
its success is largely due to the good acting that is lav- 
ished on it by the Miller Company. However silly, flimsy 
and ridiculous the piece may be in plot, situation and 
execution, it is at least funny, and fun is not a bad quality 
in a farce. 

I am in doubt as to whether His Excellency reminds me 
of a comic opera minus the music or a joke on a comic 
opera — anyway there is something very comic operaesque 
about it. 

Far away on a fictitious island in the Indian Ocean are a 
British Governor, a young officer and a private secretary, 
all theoretically opposed to matrimony in any shape or 
form; but it so happens that there is a plant of aloe on 
this island that throws into the air a powder once in a hun- 
dred years, and upon whomsoever this powder falls love 
sickness of the worse kind ensues. So when the Governor 
is visited by the Right Honorable Henry Carlton, M. P., 
together with that worthy's aged sister and daughter, 
Ethel, the three men (properly aloe-powdered) fall head 
over heels in love with Ethel. The sister is willing to fall 
in love with anybody, and a variety lady by the name of 
Stella, who has been pals with the Governor in the warm, 
red days of his youth, happens along and wins the M. P. 
just as the aloe blooms. There is more love making to the 
square inch in this piece than in Romeo and Juliet, but 
Mr. Marshall is not as tragic as Mr. Shakespeare. He 
deals in all sorts of grotesque fun. He reminds you now 
and then of the toy scene that was omitted in the Ameri- 
can production of Pinero's Princess and the Butterfly. All 
the people are fools, clever, unique fools, who are forever 
doing the unexpected. While the plot is not weighted down 
with any particular suspense, there is in the lines and in 
the subsituations an element of surprise that is at times 
almost Gilbertian. The clowning is of an epigrammatic kind, 
and the acting could not be better if a master-piece were 
at stake. 

The big bright special success of the production is 
Frank Worthing in the part of the Secretary, a chap who 
before the aloe bloomed believed not in women, nor wit 
nor love; but when the powder strikes him he becomes the 
most ludicrous of Ethel's suitors. We have seen Worth- 
ing in about every kind of a part that the modern actor 
is called on to play; he is a man of remarkable versatility, 
and every one of his characters has an identity that is 
positive and complete. This performance of his, while in 
a different vein from what we usually find him, is one of 
his best achievements. Mr. Morgan is not a humorous 
soul; intensity is his specialty, and he laughs with diffi- 
culty. He plays the Governor as he would play any other 
part, with large earnestness. It would be better in the 
hands of a lighter man, but at the same time the very in- 
congruity scores its comic effect. 
* * * 

The best of the women is Sadie Martinot and some brand 
new blonde hair as the variety girl. She is delightfully, 
deliciously foolish, almost as good as she was in The Pass- 
port; the only difference is that this part does not offer 
quite the opportunities the other one did. The ladies tell 
me Miss Martinot's gown in one act is shamefully low, and 
may be it is; but the scenic effect is enthusiastically plump 
and picturesque. Ethel was in the hands of Grace Ellis- 
ton, and very well played, I think. Miss Anglin would 
perhaps have given the role a finer color, but Miss Ellis- 
ton is easily ingenuous and free — it is the one part of that 
kind in the play. In fact, Miss Elliston and Mr. Morgan 
are in the nature of antidotes against the general epi- 
demic of foolishness; for even Mrs. Whiffin as the aged 



sister becomes foolish after the powder gets in its deadly 
work. A handsome bit of work is contributed by Mr. 
Courtney as the officer. Mr. Courtney cannot help being 
good-looking, but his good acting in this part is entirely 
his own fault. Mr. Walcott is vigorously funny as the M. P., 
and Mr. Lamb presents another of his inimitable butlers. 

* * * 

Miss Florence Roberts' presentation of Peggy in the 
Country Girl at the Alcazar is a good honest success well 
won. By temperament Miss Roberts is slow and formal, 
her elocution runs to Swedish cadence; but in spite of man- 
nerisms and handicaps she brings a lot of good fun and 
hearty sympathy to this famous role. I liked her par- 
ticularly in the park scene. A male impersonation is 
rarely funny, but this one in its timidity, frankness 
and natural spirit is altogether charming. Few women 
are willing to be awkward on the stage even when the 
part and the author demand it, and few women even 
when they are willing can be awkward gracefully; but 
Miss Roberts leaves all false blandishments behind and 
plays Peggy just as she should be played, with the real 
low comedy spirit of the period in which the piece was 
written. Mr. Whittlesey is a graceful figure as Belville, 
and Mr. Emery as Harcourt is not bad, although self-con- 
scious. The part of Moody is played with capital con- 
ventional effect by Theodore Roberts. The Alcazar has 
given the piece a pretty scenic environment and fresh, 
comely costumes, indeed the production has a style about 
it that is not usual in the efforts of our local stock com- 
panies. 

* * # 

Dunne & Ryley's comedians have waked up with a rush 
in Rush City, a farce-comedy written for Matthews and 
Bulger some years ago, but new to us. This is really 
quite the best production they have offered this year. 
The piece might even be suspected of a plot, and the 
stage management and the actors must have been busy 
for a few hours by themselves instead of rehearsing on 
the first night before the audience. 

As the real estate agent with a town to sell, and in- 
numerable offices to hold, and everybody to work, Mr. 
Matthews, in that cool, perky way of his, makes the most 
of the comicality. Bulger follows him closely as a non- 
descriptive personality with a machine for worrying the 
elements into anything from rain to cyclones. Mr. Dunne 
is once again in the cast, this time as a political heeler 
and orator with a silver tube in his throat. Without the 
tube his voice is inaudible, and Mr. Matthews' inspiration 
of peppering Bulger's handkerchief so as to make him 
sneeze and lose his tube and voice in a political crisis, is 
howlingly comic. Mary Marble does another infantile 
part in her usual manner, which is perhaps the best on 
the farce-comic stage for this specialty. And Norma 
Whalley is as audaciously beautiful as ever. Her acting 
is an unconscious impertinence. 

The best of the specialties, and there are many, is the 
coon song by Bessie Tannehill; it lifts the house. We 
have not had enough of Miss Tannehill's songs this season. 
Mr. Bulger startled the natives and wrenched several en- 
cores by playing a solo on a snare drum. He handles the 
sticks like a veteran. I wonder if he was ever in the 
minstrel business and had to join the band in the street 

parade? 

* * * 

The particular new-comer at the Orpheum is Miss 
Jessie Padgham, who sings sentimental ballads of a better 
order than we usually bear in vaudeville in a strong, son- 
orous soprano. As yet she is a bit awkward in her en- 
trances and exits, but the vaudeville manner is easily 
acquired, and I eee no reason why Miss Padgham should 
not be a success on the circuit. The Orpbeum is about as 
hard a house to play against as there is in the country, 
and her victory during the past week has not been ques- 
tioned. 

A farce called The Janitor, of no particular merit, is 
played with rough hilarity by Joe J. Sullivan and Carrie 
Weber. Sullivan is bigger and even noisier, and very 
much like Johnnie Ray. It is the memory of the rafter- 
shaking Ray, I think, that makes the audience applaud 
him as it does. Miss Weber is the usual female accom- 
plice. 

Mazie King, a young woman with toes of steel and an 



Joly 78, 1900. 



SAN i \BWS LETTEll. 



unbreakable smile, tiptoes up and down stairs all over the 
1 from a table to the floor with rare facility. 

Etta Butler has the best of her old caricatures, and 
some new ones that are not quite as good. Next to I 
Loftus she is the cleverest mimic in the business. I hear 
that David Belasco is going to give her a chance for 
originality in his little Japanese tragedy, and I do not 
blame him. Etta Butler is going up hill at the pace that 
wins. 

Lillian Burkhart has been playing four or five different 
pieces during the week, the only new one being .1 tlnrrrt 
>n, a condensed melodrama snatched from "Oliver 
Twist." It Is gloomy, grewsome and stupid in its obvious 
artificiality and unworthy of the actress, who is to-day 
the foremost legitimate hope of vaudeville. 

* * * 

The opening night for the new bill of the Frawley Com- 
pany at the Grand Opera House next week will be Tues- 
day, owing to the fact that the house has been sold on 
Monday to the Woodmen of the World, on which occasion 
The Greit Ruby will be given for the last time. The next 
play is to be The Red Lamp, whose crimson glow so long 
illumined and made rosy the pathway of the distinguished 
English character actor Beerbohm Tree. Tree was the 
first to branch out in England as Svengali, which char- 
acterization he ruthlessly swiped from Mr. Wilton 
Lackaye, and now the latter will wreak poetic justice on 
the British mummer's head by doing his Demetrius in The 
Red Lamp, which is Mr. Tree's favorite role. 

* # * 

The next to the last week of the Dunne and Ryley sea- 
son at the California Theatre will be ushered in to-morrow 
night with Matthews and Bulger's By the Sad Sea Waves. 
It is not a sentimental play, in spite of its name — in fact, 
the extraordinary things the comedians do by the melan- 
choly briny have always been enough to jar the poets 
wherever they have appeared. By the Sad Sea Waves is 
called a rag-time opera, the best title for that kind of 
thing yet given it. For the last week of the Dunne and 
Ryley engagement The Night of the Fourth will be played 
for the first time in this city. 

* * * 

At the Columbia Theatre, during the coming week, 
Henry Miller and the members of his special company will 
appear in a fine production of Lee Trevor's comedy- 
drama, Brother Officers, which was so well taken here last' 
season when it received its initial American production at 
the hands of Henry Miller. The list of players will include, 
besides Henry Miller, E. J. Morgan, Charles Walcot, 
Edwin Stevens, Frank E. Lamb, E. Y. Backus, William 
Courtenay, Harry Spear, Margaret Anglin, Margaret 
Dale, Mrs. Thomas Whiffen and Lillian Thurgate. Fol- 
lowing Brother Officers we are to have an elaborate pro- 
duction of the popular romantic play, Heartsease. 

* * # 

The Tivoli's grand opera season begins next Monday 
evening. Aida and Lucia will be the bills; Aida on Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday nights, and Lucia 
on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday evenings and at the 
Saturday matinee. Aida will introduce Signors Avedano, 
Salassa, Alessandro Nicolini, William Schuster, and, 
Frances Tempest Graham and Miss Anna Lichter; while 
in Lucia the cast will include Signora Italia Repetto, the 
"Italian Melba," Signor Domonico Russo, the tenor, and 
Signor Ferrari, the barytone. The attention of the pub- 
lic is called to the fact that the grand opera performances 
will commence promptly at eight o'clock, by which hour 
patrons are requested to be seated. 
» * * 

Romeo and Julitt will be the bill at the Alcazar next 
week, with Florence Roberts as Juliet and White Whit- 
tlesey as Romeo. The wardrobe is all new and likewise 
the scenery, and the whole promises to distance the former 

presentation at the Alcazar. 

* * * 

The engagement of Mr. and Mrs. John Mason at the 
Orpheum is an important one, and should do much to in- 
sure the success of the new bill. Mrs. Mason is better 
known as Katherine Gray, and is one of New York's most 
successful leading women. This is her first appearance 
in vaudeville and the first time she and her husband have 



ever appeared together professionally. At the conclusion 
of their Orpheum mgagMMat they will complete the va- 
cation for which they came to California and then return 
to the legitimate ranks. 

• » • 

The Burton Holmes lectures on Thursday afternoons 
and Sunday nights at the Columbia Theatre are a pros- 

?ering institution under the direction of Henry Miller, 
he second series are being Riven this week with "Japan 
Revisited" as the subject. This lecture is one of the most 
successful of all the lectures, and it brings out some of the 
finest illustrations of the season. 

• • * 

S. H. Friedlander & Co. announce an elaborate revival 
of "The Brownies in Fairyland" at the California Theatre 
on the afternoons of Thursday, Friday and Sunday, 
August 9, 10 and 12 and on the evenings of the following 
week. 

Among the participants in next week's programme at 
Fisher's Concert House will be Jeanette Lewis, comedienne; 
Agnes Fried, soprano; Little Alma Wittridge, singer and 
dancer, Mae Tunison, soprano, and Deets and Don, 
novelty duo. 

The Lyceum Theatre School of Acting is established at 
310-312 O'Farrell street. A dramatic agency, physical 
culture department and dancing academy are run in con- 
nection. Mr. F. W. Stechan is the manager, and guar- 
antees suitable positions for finished pupils. 

THE double-page picture issued with this week's News 
Letter is a photographic description of the power 
house of the Independent Electric Light and Power Com- 
pany. 

New things in Pictures, Paintings, Statuary, and other Art Goods, 
as well as new patterns in Cut Glass, Crockery, and Glassware, re- 
ceived daily a S. & G Gamp Co., 113 Geary street. 



Above all things don't become a drunkard; use whiskey moder- 
ately and use the best. Jesse Moore "AA" is the purest and best. 



New Map 


Of 


California 




FREE 




A new map of the State of California, 
right up to date, will be given free to any 
applicant either by mail or in person. 
Address Santa Fe Office, 628 Market St., 
San Francisco. 



PEERLESS OIL CO. 

Is prepared to supply 

Fuel Oil by the Carload 

in any quantity, at any railroad station. Address 
Room 47, 8th Floor. Mills Building, San Francisco. 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros. Company 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 
' Oceanic Steamship Company 
Gillingham Cement 

327 Market street, corner Fremont 



General AgentB 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July a8, 1900. 





Library&abk 



Overland Coming at this time, and from the pen of so 
to China, well-known an authority on matters appertain- 
ing to the Far East, Mr. Archibald R. Colqu- 
houn's "Overland to China," — a companion volume to 
" China in Transformation," which appeared about a 
twelve-month since — will undoubtedly attract wide atten- 
tion. The present work is the result of long personal ob- 
servation, the author having made many journeys in China, 
north and south, during the past twenty years. He is 
an Englishman, a gold medalist of the Royal Geographical 
Society, and has occupied the position of Deputy Commis- 
sioner to Burma; also Administrator of Mashonanland. He 
served through the French campaign in Tonking, as cor- 
respondent of the Times; and as recently as 1896-97 made 
a careful study on the spot of the political and financial 
changes in progress in the Chinese capital, visiting also 
Japan. Anxious to see for himself the scene of the great 
enterprise undertaken by the Russian Government, the 
Trans-Siberian Railway, which will connect in one un- 
broken line the Baltic and the China sea, Mr. Colqu- 
houn in 1898-99 made a journey of seven thousand miles 
by means of rail and tarantass, camel, camel-cart, and 
mule litter, native Chinese boat and saddle pony, mule 
and sedan chair, from European Russia to the Gulf of 
Tonking. "The fact," says the author, "that such a 
journey was made, allowing for various sojourns en route, 
within a period of seven months, affords a striking proof 
of the changes which are in progress and of the rate at 
which distances are being annihilated in Asia." 

The first four chapters of the book are devoted to the 
conquest and occupation of Siberia by the Russians, and 
remarkable indeed is the story of the unostentatious sub- 
jugation of this immense area, twenty-five times greater 
than that of Germany, and acquired at a cost ridiculously 
small. Rich in gold, grain and cattle; furs, fish, and tim- 
ber; coal, lead, and mercury; silver, copper, and iron, 
Siberia's commercial future is not difficult to foretell, but 
for Russia it possesses an importance far beyond the in- 
trinsic value of its wealth, so long held in trust for future 
centuries. First, and above all, it opens the way to the 
ocean, and is the first stage on the road which Russia has 
for generations been instinctively pursuing towards the 
warmth and light, the open sea, the Golden South. 

Of the route which is to bring the vast empire of China 
for the first time into intimate touch with Europe — the 
world's highway from West to East — Mr. Colquhoun gives 
many most interesting details. The work has been car- 
ried on with incredible energy ever since it was sanctioned 
by the Tsar, but its scope has been infinitely enlarged, for 
"from being little more than a local enterprise, it now 
promises to develop into one of the greatest arteries of 
traffic the world has yet seen, and into a political instru- 
ment whose far-reaching effects it is difficult to gauge." 
The writer draws some interesting comparisons between 
the first American railway line across our continent and 
. the Great Russian enterprise. He says: "In sheer length 
the Trans-Siberian will be almost double that of the Trans- 
American continental railway. The maximum altitude of 
3608 feet, overcome by very gentle gradients while cross- 
ing the Yablonio (or Apple) Mountains (so called from 
their rounded contours) cannot, however, for a moment 
be compared with the giddy precipices of the Sierra 
Nevada, or the 6500 feet ascent of the Rocky Mountains. 
And although the Siberian plains are, perhaps, as scan- 
tily populated as were those of the Far West in 1860-70, 
they include no such waterless tracts as the Utah and 
Nevada wildernesses. * * * In point of actual rate of con- 
struction, the Siberian maximum is far behind the Ameri- 
can one, though it must be considered fast under the cir- 
cumstances. Six versts, or three miles and three-quar- 
ters, per diem, is the highest ever achieved by the 
Russians — a poor record when compared with the ten and 
a half miles credited to American brain and Chinese labor 
on the San Francisco section of the American line. But the 



Americans, on the other hand, took nearly seven years 
to complete a distance of 1800 miles; whereas in Siberia 
nearly a thousand miles beyond that amount was accom- 
plished in less than eight years. As has been shown, the 
difficulties of the country itself were immeasurably greater 
on the American line, but, as a set off, it must be remem- 
bered that the working season in Siberia lasts only six 
months, from April to September, at other times the 
ground being frozen too hard for anything to be done." 

It seems difficult to realize that trains fitted up with 
all modern luxuries are now actually running through the 
heart of the Siberian wastes. As far as Ob-Krivoschikovo 
(the junction for Tomsk) a train de luxe is available, "which 
includes library, gymnasium, bath-rooms, lavatories, and 
even a piano," says Mr. Colquhoun. The cost of the line, 
it is thought, will greatly exceed the original estimate of 
a hundred and ninety million dollars, and large additional 
sums have already been voted for improvements in bridges, 
rails, etc. It is hoped that when these shall have been 
completed, a maximum speed of thirty- three miles an hour 
for passenger-trains will have been attained. The year 
1902 is mentioned as the date fixed for the completion of 
the Trans-Siberian railway; then, to quote again, "the jour- 
ney from Paris to the Pacific Coast will occupy eleven 
days only, and that to Shanghai, at the most, fifteen, as 
compared with the present minimum of about one month 
and a half. The saving in money will be no less marked 
than the saving in time. At present a first-class fare by 
mail-steamer to central China, (say Shanghai) costs just 
over £70, whereas the expenditure for the journey over- 
land will amount to less than half this sum." The author's 
last word in regard to this great Russian railway is that 
the fact must always be kept in mind that: "it is a strate- 
getic line, which has been carried out at high pressure 
from start to finish, expense being disregarded as an un- 
important item when compared with results aimed at, one 
of the most noteworthy features in its construction being 
the vast number of sidings built, in order that the single 
main line may always be kept open in case of emergency. 
The importance of a line such as this, which will pass 
right through from St. Petersburg to Port Arthur, being 
joined later by a branch from the Trans-Caspian system, 
is obvious. The bear's arms are closing on India." More 
than once the author sounds a note of warning to his fel- 
low countrymen against the growing power of Russia who, 
he says, "moves steadily forward, never turning aside; 
' always keeps her promises and fulfills her threats; devotes 
her energies to a steady advance, and does not waste 
time in talking." 

Other chapters of this valuable book, of which no page 
should be missed, are devoted to Peking, its past and 
present, to Manchuria, and Eastern Mongolia, to the 
Yangtsze Valley, Southeast China, and Tonking. In the 
final chapter the writer voices the conclusions arrived at 
during his travels. He states that everything be observed 
during the whole course of his journey confirmed the be- 
lief that "China was breaking up at lightning speed." He 
then goes on to show bow through contact with foreign 
powers by land and sea the Chinese Government has lost 
its supremacy, its vitality, and the ability to defend its 
possessions. From north to south the trail of the for- 
eigner is on the land, and China must inevitably be dis- 
membered and broken up. 

That Great Britain and the United States should co- 
operate actively in deciding on some common plan of action 
in view of the entirely new conditions arising in Asia, is 
Mr. Colquhoun's last word. "The awakening to life of a 
whole fifth of the world's surface, long thought dead, 
must necessitate no slight readjustment among the other 
occupants. And when with the dawn of the twentieth 
century the new challenger enters the world's lists, it will 
not do for the Anglo-Saxon to plead that he had had no no- 
tice of the jousts!" 

Many excellent maps and illustrations, the first map 
showing the successive advances of Russia in Asia, add in- 
terest to a most interesting book, and one that no one 
anxious to know more of that Far East which is at the 
present time "the observed of all observers," can afford 
to ignore. 

Overland to China : by Archibald R. Colquhoun. Harper & Brother*. 
PubllHhere, New York. Price, 83. 

M. E. B. 



July iS, '900 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTFR. 






&own Crier p 



Hit tit CntrKtfhat tin dttitart Mm 
SI 'Omtlut mil pi*/ tht dm/, w. wit/ou 




w 



ITU fun pursuing butterflies 
Across the Berkeley hills, 
With bags to entymo'ogiie 

And friends to pay his bills. 

With gentle "guards" to hold bis bat 

And shield him when it rains 
And downy beds in good hotels 

To sooth bis aches and pains. 

No wonder Jnlian Arnold is 

With duranse vile delighted 
And mast offended at the thought 

Of being extradited. 

JIM CREELMAN, at whose behest the earth makes its 
revolutions, who brings on a war by a scratch of his 
pen, who portrays the inmost thoughts of Princes who 
never spoke to bim, and lays bare the secrets that diplo- 
macy never possessed; Jim Creelman, Pooh-Bah of the 
Universe, mentor of nations, understudy of omnipotence, 
gifted with gab, laden with a wealth of cheek, has yet to 
learn one thing. Having learned it, he will experience 
the emotion of knowing something. Jim insists on telling 
of the Japanese character as fluently as though a person 
in the world cared for his expression. He has never 
tumbled to the fact, undeniable, palpable, overwhelming, 
that not a word he writes is received seriously; and for 
the simple reason that it is not believed. If he ever tells 
the truth in print, he has never been caught at it. Ac- 
cording to the judgment of readers, he lies, and lies and 
lies. That's what's the matter with Jim. It is not a 
fault, but a misfortune. He is at heart as innocent as the 
kleptomaniac. He shies at a fact as a mule does at a 
flapping buffalo robe. Were he to detect a correct state- 
ment flowing from the end of his pen, he would immediately 
send for the doctor to treat him for paresis. There is no 
need of feeling sorry for Jim, however. He enjoys life 
variously. On every occasion there are correspondents 
striving to give accurate accounts, and in striving not to 
give tbem, Jim has a clear field. 

JAMES Taylor Rogers' present pose, involuntary, as a 
rogue, may work some good in the community. At 
least it will detract from the brilliancy of the light which 
as a reformer he is wont to shed over a dazzled commun- 
ity. It will also teach the younger lawyers that the way 
of the transgressor is not strewn alone with roses. Of 
course the guilt of Rogers has not been legally demon- 
strated. When a man is asked if he stole a pig, and re- 
plies that he could not possibly commit himself on this 
point without getting mixed in a felony charge, there is a 
tradition in procedure which declares that the matter of 
guilt has not been touched upon, and that the presump- 
tion of innocence has been in no way impaired. Neverthe- 
less, the man who lost the pig has a right to entertain 
suspicions. Rogers will not say he stole the pig; neither 
will he say that he did not. Perhaps this will bind the 
hands of justice, and soothe the savage breasts of the Bar 
Association, but it forever inhibits for Rogers the epitaph 
so desired by lawyers: "Here lies an honest man." 

S SILLY habit so firmly fixed that to combat it is 
probably useless, is that of abusing the street-car 
company every time it undertakes the extension of a line. 
Such an extension, necessarily, is for the benefit of the 
public, increases the value of property, promotes the gen- 
eral convenience, and its construction involves a large ex- 
penditure. Yet it is opposed invariably, and the loudest 
yawpers are those who do not invest money, have no large 
interests, and no reason for their hostility. San Fran- 
cisco has as good a street-car system as any city in the 
United States, the most liberal scheme of transfers ever 
devised, and steady improvements are being made. But 
each has to be made despite a sandlot roar. 



IT Is a pity that such a woman as Alvlra Townsend 
could not have been permitted to die in peace, and not 
have a lot of harpies and scandal-mongers flocking about 
her bier. She was a most generous woman, and the fact 
that many years bro she had been divorced wa« strictly 
her business. There seems to be a direct heir to the for 
tune she left, and yet from hither and yon come relatives 
or alleged relatives, an ex-husband, a long estranged 
brother, hoping to get their lingers Into the treasure. 
And in making the matter bear a grewsTne and uncanny 
aspect, the yellow press is freely lending its services. 
The mistake the daughter made was in presuming to have 
any secrets she was chary about sharing with the first 
fresh young reporter who came along. Out here the 
press makes a specialty of closet skeletons, and is williog, 
if necessary, to supply the closet, and articulate any old 
set of bones it can find. The dead are not entitled to re- 
spect nor the living to consideration. It is not a high 
standard of journalism. 

POLICE Judges of San Francisco are four in number — 
Conlan, Mogan, Fritz and Cabaniss, surely enough to 
deal promptly with the array of sinners netted by the 
police. But they do not so deal, and there must be some- 
thing the matter. It is that the jobs are political, and 
each Judge is afraid of hurting the pull by offending the 
push. Cases of importance are kicked from one court to 
the other, the frankly assumed ground being that no 
Judge wants to try them. Here is Chretien fairly de- 
manding a start on his trip towards San Quentin, and 
each department afraid to tackle the job. They shy at 
incurring the dislike of the pool gamblers, or anybody else 
having a possible influence. With a plain drunk or a wife 
beater they are at home. It is not a pleasing spectacle 
afforded by Judges scrambling out of the way of duties 
they are paid to perform. 



ft 



NOTHEE beggar clad in rags 

Upon the corner stands. 
His looks, suggesting better days, 
Your sympathy commands. 

Reward him with a nickel as 

You seek your happy home. 
He well deserves your charity, 
For he has been to Nome. 

J A. MACDONALD is a local money broker, no better 
, and probably no worse than others of bis kind. He 
has caused the arrest of a man to whom he had made a 
loan of $275 at a monthly interest of 5 per cent., a rate 
that, whatever the law may say, has all the essential ele- 
ments of robbery. These brokers, to whom the distress 
of fellow mortals merely represents so much collateral, 
are more to be feared than a band of highwaymen. Mac- 
Donald's victim claims to have paid interest to the 
amount of $300, and yet the pound-of-flesh gentleman 
asserts that the debt is still as large as it was in the be- 
ginning. It is high time that the blood-sucking fraternity 
be given a legislative check. They ought to be limited to 
a decent interest, and forced to pay a reasonable license. 
When a man has paid $300 on a $275 debt, to hold him for 
the entire principal is, clearly, to hold him up. 

RUFFIANS who make assaults on the Chinese pleading 
the present condition of affairs in China as an excuse, 
should be herded in the city jail without delay. Nobody 
here, outside the missions, has any love for the Chinese, 
but it must be admitted that they are more useful to the 
community than are the beetle-browed, gin soaked loafers 
who assail them. 

THE villain laughs, "Ha-ha, ho-hol" 
The mawther screams "Me cheeld l" 
And every pitch of joy or woe 

Is shouted, sobbed or squealed. 
The bootblack on the upper tier 

Hisses the villain's vaunt: 
Thus Frawley melodramatized 
Doth fill a long-felt want. 

« POLICEMAN was given a taste of his own club last 
Sunday, and found the result, a fractured skull, some- 
what disagreeable. Strangely enough, the assailant was 
charged with an assault with a deadly weapon. If a club 
is a deadly weapon in the hands of a civilian, what is it in 
the} hands, of a policeman? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 




T 



HE imperial bear of Russia 
Soon will fight the bird of Prussia, 

Creelman says; 
While the greedy British lion 
To offend them both is tryin', 
Creelman says. 

And the crafty Japanese 
Look for conquest overseas, 

Creelman says; 
And Ihey 're raising men and rations 
To help China lick the nations, 

Creelman says. 

And unless the heathen Zulu 
Interferes at Honolulu, 

Creelman says, 
There will soon be war between 
Ireland and the Philippines, 

Creelman says. 

If McKinley is elected, 
And if Roosevelt is selected, 

Creelman says, 
We will have to go to war 
With the subjects of the Czar, 

Creelman says. 
* * * » # 

Oh, a corker at prediction, 
And a champion at fiction, 

Creelman is. 
As a prophet he's a bird— 
But 1 don 't believe a word 

Creelman says. 
* * * 

ODce a farce comedian always a farce comedian. Bulger 
is as wildly funny off the stage as on. After the opening 
of Rvsh Oily was over last Sunday night, he and Mathews 
and four companions drifted across the street from the 
California Theatre toNormann's Cafe to cool off in beer. 
The waiter was typically slow and after sitting for three 
minutes at one of the tables near the bar the orders had 
not been taken. 

Then bang, bang, bang, went the Bulger fist on the 
table. "Waiter," he gasped, "get a messenger boy, 
quick I" 

The alarm was rung and the boy there in a minute. 



"My son," said Bulger, "go over to the bar and fetch us 
six glasses of beer." 

The boy brought the beer and a grin as wide as his hat. 

"How much?" asked Bulger. 

"Thirty." 

"Well here's a half; keep the change." And the six 
drank in silence, and then walked out into the night. And 
the German waiter is still rubbing his eyes. 

* * * 

Speaking of actors, I supped with a jolly crowd of 
them the other night, and heard some quips and stories 
that struck me as being very good. Wilton Lack aye was 
with us, and told a gem on himself to the credit of Nat 
Goodwin. It happened at a big feast at the Lambs' Club. 
Lackaye, a brilliant speech-maker with or without notes, 
had on this occasion prepared an address, and it was a 
wonder. At its conclusion there was that strenuous 
silence that prefaces the genuine applause. And the 
silence was broken by the voice of Goodwin, in mock ap- 
preciation, crying: 

"Authorl Authorl" 

And the applause was side-tracked for laughter. 

* # * 

But it seems that sometimes the most brilliant actor is 
incapable of making a speech, as in the instance of 
Maurice Barrymore, the epigrammatist extraordinary of 
actordom. When the Lambs surprised him with a loving- 
cup at one of their nocturnal gatherings, he stood up only 
to sit down again, choked and incoherent. And yet 
"Barry" has said more memorable things than any man 
on the American stage. 

When he was playing the adventurer with Mrs. Langtry 
in As in a Looking Glass, she took exception to his man- 
ners in a certain part of the performance. 

"Are you not used to the society of gentlewomen?" in- 
quired the Lily, with obese insolence. 

"Yes, quite," said Barry. "I have a mother and 1 am 
married." 

"But 1 mean women of my world?" said the beauty. 

"Yes, them, too, and I've paid them for their society 
punctually every morning." 

"It was a clever and necessary thing to say," said Bar- 
rymore a year or two after, "but it gave me six months 
uninterrupted idleness." 

* * # 

Barry loved his wife. Who couldn't have loved Georgie 
Drew Barrymore, but he would wait for the dawn to come 
up like thunder and sip the bubbles that tangle and trip. 

One morning he went home at about five, entered his 
wife's bedchamber with the stately tread that is com- 




LAKE TAHOE. 



July 28, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



"i 



posed of conscience and will power and beard ' 
quire: "la that you, Maur 

"Yea, dear," be answered, "whom did you ex i< 
... 

One niifht In the Red Room of the Bohemian Club Lack- 
aye, Joe Redding, dear dead George Na^le, Charlie P 
and Barrymore and a bunch of jovial souls were employ- 
ing ibe time lo writing epitaphs for the livto/. This is the 
one Lackaye wrote for Barrymore; and there is as much 
truth as poetry in it: 

I've talked beneath the stars 
And I've sleet beneath the sun, 
I've lived a life of going to do 
And died with nothing done. 
• * » 

Still speaking of actors, I have just found out that 
Harrington Reynolds does not make his own darirg leap 
from the balloon In Mr. Frawley's production of Th Great 
Ruby. He did jump the first and second niyhts, but after 
that a human dummy was put in the cage to plunge the 
twenty-four feet. Mr. Frawley bad taken every precau- 
tion to insure the safety of his heavy man. He had 
poulticed the woodwork under the stage with the softest 
of feathers; he had detailed twelve supers to hold the fire- 
man's sheet of caovas at the bottom of the drop (sixteen 
feet below tbe level of the stage); he had told Reynolds 
how easy it was, and at rehearsals had made the fall him- 
self by way of encou age ment. 

But the heart of the heavy man grew faiDt; aDd the 
first night he was the most reluctant Steve Brodie you 
ever saw; the second night he jjmped first to the stage 
and then down tbe bole. 

"Holy Morosco!" said Frawley; "there are no stop- 
overs on this trip. And you were a captain in Her 
Majesty's army." 

"That's all right; I'd rather be a captain now and 
fight Boxers than shoot that chute." 

And they couldn't get him in the balloon again. So a 
husky young gentleman of the South-side has been substi- 
tuted in the sensational scene. 

"She IdeaJ Season for Lake Ta.hoe. 

THIS is the most delightful time of the year to visit any 
of the resorts around Lake Tahoe. The water in the 
various streams is lower now, const quently there is better 
stream fishing. The fish take the fly readily, and lake 
fishing 13 always popular especially w.th the ladies, miny 
of whom are very successful. The completion of the rail- 
road from Truckee to Tahoe has reduced the time for the 
trip considerably. This road runs aloug the Truckee 
River through the most del ghtf ul scenery, making the 
trip in about an hour. The steel steamer Tahoe, which is 
a very comfortable and fast bjat, makes- the trip around 
the lake every day connecting with the trains and stop- 
ping at the various resorts. The trip is a most enjoyable 
one; the wonderful blue of the water of Tahoe with occa- 
sional shades of green, U something never to be forgo. ten 
by the visitor. The resorts around the lake afford every- 
thing that can be desired. Should you want delightful fly 
fishing and magnificent scenery take the stage at Mc- 
Kinneys and ride ten miles to Rubicon Springs, a 
picturesque drive over a forest of pines of the Sierra 
Nevadas. The Rubicon River just now offers the best fly 
fishing, and the scenery is grand beyond description. On 
Lake Tahoe is the Tallac Hotel, one of the few really first- 
class hotels that you will find among the country resorts. 
One of the advantages this hotel possesses over any other 
resort around the lake is the large number of places one 
may conveniently visit by starting from here. There are 
over forty different trips that can be made; so that one 
may stay at this place an indefinite period and still be 
able to see a different country and different scenery every 
day of the stay, besides having the finest trout fishing in 
the world on Lake Tahoa or on Fallen Leaf Lake, only a 
mile away. 

Comet de Orient. 

Cigarette de Luxe— finest Turkish tobacco. At M. Blaskowkr 4 

Co., 223 Montgomery St. and 1 Kearny St. , cor. Geary, San Francisco. 

Foe family use Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey is a prime favorite, 
and in thousands of homes it is always on the buffet. 



Grand Opera Mouse. 



Il««itinln« 1 <r, Julr IIH. 

The New FRAWLEY Company 

In ihr lataBM dlMI "i KiimIri, 

TME RED LAMP. 

don BiloOtMB. 

. IV.. »a.ai>e. 

oiumbia I neatre. ■*»•«» and Manner*. 



Beginning noxl Monday, July 8Mb. Cbarlaa Prohoaan proMnl* 
HENRY Mill. Kit and i ipeolal Company, »i« nights nod w«<i- 
-liiy matinee. The London, New Y>>rk, mid 
Baa Pimnab 

BROTHER OFFICERS 

A comedy-drama In three MM by Lm Trarar, Henry Miller a* 
Lieutenant John Hindu. "Comrade. I want you to make a gen- 
tleumn out <»f ma." 
August 6th: HBARTSEAHB. 

Kvcry Thursday afternoon find every Sunday night. The Bra- 
iny IIoi.MMs LkiTUBES. 

Alraiar Tk/a-.+ r-A Belasco AThall. Managers. 

nicazar i neatre. phone. Main 2m. 

Week of July 30th. Florence Roherts, supported by White Whit- 
tlesey, in a beautiful production «.f 

ROMEO AND cJULIET 



Alcazar Prioes — 15c.. 25c„ 35o„ 50c. 
In preparation: Fbou FfiOtf. 



Only Matinee Saturday. 



0_„ L ^ , , __ Ban Francisco's Oread 
rPneU m . O'Farrell St.. between 



Ban Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

Stockton and Powell streets. 



MR. 



AND MRS. dOMN MASON 

(Katberlne Gray) 



Nichols Sisters Zclma Rswlston 

St. Onge Brothers Mr. and Mrs. Tobln 

Sullivan & Webber Ma/.le King 

Jessie Padgham Biograph 

Reserved Seats 25c.: balcony 10o.; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

O-IIX^^,' TL„X THE POPULAR HOUSE. 

\S&) I TOm 1 3 I neaXre. Reservations by 'Phone, Main 1781 

La"t week but one of Dunne & Ryley's all-star cast, including nil 
the favorites; John W.Dunne and MATTHEWS <t BULGER, In 
the rag-time opera, 

BY THE SAD SEA WAVES 

Thirty introduced specialties, including "Money in the Bank." 
Only matinee Saturday. 

Week of August 5th: Farewell week of Dunne & Ryley's all-star 
cast. Piny to be announced: THE NIGHT OF THE FOURTH 

T' t | ' r\ I— 1 Mas. Ernestine Kreling, 

IVOll UDera flOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Commencing Monday, July 30th, opening of the 

GRAND OPERA SEASON 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday nights, AID A.. 
Tuesday. Thursday, Sunday evenings Saturday matinee, Lucia, 
Patrons are reauested to be seated by 8 o'clock sharp; the per - 
formance will begin at that hour. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 

Fischer's New Concert House o-FarrVuV 

Beginning Monday, July 30lh, E. A. Fischer, Proprietor. 

Great programme, including Jeanette Lewis, Agnes Fried, Little 
Alma Wittridge, Mae Tunison, Deets & Don, and other eminent 
artist.". , 

Admission, 10 cents; reserved seats, 25 cents: matinee Sunday. 



Columbia Theatre- -Extra. 

BURTON HOLMES LECTURES 

Direction Henry Miller. Illustrations in colors. Appropriate 

motion pictures. Two courses exactly alike. 

Six Thursday Matinees at 2:30 
S'x Sunday Evenings at 8*30 

"Manila." July 10th and 22d; "Japan Revisited," July 26th ami 

29th; "Round About Pai'iH," August 2d and 5th; "Grand Canon," 

August 9th and 12th; "Moki Land," August 16th and 19th; *'Ha>» 

waiian Islands," 23d and 26th. 

Reserved seats, 81, 75c, and 60c, ready Monday. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the show Is 
• over. --' ■ 

Lyceum Theatre School of Acting, 

310-312 O'FARRELL ST., one block from Alcazar and Orpheum, S. F. 

The largest and most complete School of Acting and Dramatic Agency west 
of New York. Suitable positions guaranteed to finished pupils. For terms 
call on or address F. W. STECHAN, Manager. Send for prospectus. 

Professor F. Bouley's Select Dancing Academy in conjunction with Ly- 
ceum School of Acting. Ballroem, Fancy and Stage Dancing taught in 
classes and private lessons. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



July 28, 1900. 




One of the most promising investments in 
The London the local market just now is the stock in 
Oil Company, the London Oil Company, a recent incor- 
poration, owniDg by purchase 5.000 acres 
of oil land at the junction of what are termed the Union 
and Coalinga oil belts, lying in Fresno and San Benito 
Counties. There are many productive wells in the imme- 
diate vicinity of this immense tract of land, which is one of 
the largest single holdings of the kind in this State. The 
value of this land is unquestioned, and the possibilities in 
the way of development in store for the London Oil Com- 
pany are practically unlimited. In a report upon this 
ground made for this company, J. E. Wilson, C. E., a 
man of the highest reputation as an oil expert, says: "The 
land is a well defined oil belt. . . . The indications for 
light gravity oil are very good. I have spent several 
years in investigating the producing oil fields of this 
State, and after a careful examination of this district, 
will say that the indications are equal to any I have seen. 
In ray opinion there is a body of oil here which will, when 
developed, equal, if not surpass, any district yet devel- 
oped." In the matter of exploiting its vast territory the 
company has already outlined a plan which will prove ad- 
vantageous to the shareholders. It will both sell and 
lease portions of the ground to parties who will agree to 
begin sinking wells at once, and already negotiations to 
this effect are under way. As this land is worth, as the 
market goes to-day, anywhere from $600 to $1,600 per 
acre, the profits from sales, together with royalties on 
leased ground, should provide some handsome profits for 
stockholders, each of whom will be entitled to his pro 
rata. In addition to this a number of subsidiary com- 
panies will be organized, the profits of which will be 
shared with the parent company. All of this is of course 
aside from the individual operations of the London Oil 
Company itself, which is now preparing for active work 
in the field, and boring on its first well is to commence 
immediately. To provide the money necessary to carry 
on initiatory work the company is now offering 75,000 
shares of the stock set aside for working capital at 25 
cents, an offer which will not be extended over a long 
period, when the price of the stock will be advanced, due 
notice of this being given to shareholders, so that intend- 
ing investors will do well to avail themselves of the pres- 
ent opportunity to get in on bed-rock. The par value of 
the stock is $1, and it will be worth all that in a few 
months. The list of the officers and directors of the Lon- 
don Oil Company is as follows: President, C. H. Phillips, 
capitalist, who in 1894 purchased the Cbioo ranch of 44,000 
acres in San Bernardino County for $1,600,000, this being 
one of the heaviest real estate transactions ever ac- 
complished in this State. This property was afterward 
sold by Mr. Phillips to an English syndicate. Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. M. Gleaves, United States Surveyor General for 
the State of California; Hon. James G. Maguire, ex- 
Congressman from California, director; C. H. Dunsmoor, 
Secretary of the Board of California Bank Commissioners, 
director; Secretary and General Manager, O. A. Lane, 
who is secretary of the Fresno Alpha Oil Company, and 
also secretary of the Pacific Coast Mining, Milling and 
Development Company. The offices of the company are 
in the Mills Building. The capital stock is $700,000, 
divided into 700,000 shares of the par value of $1 per share. 

Among the many oil enterprises ou tne 

California Rock- market none is more promising than that 

Oil Company, of the California Rock Oil-Company. Well 

number 1 is already down 450 feet, and 
the stratum formation indicates that the company will strike 
the first oil sand at 600 feet. The California Rock-Oil well is 
one-quarter of a mile from the Independence Oil Company's 
territory, which now has two large producing wells; and the 
stratum formation in the Rock-Oil territory is the same 
as that of the Independence. Every well so far bored in sec- 



tion 28, T. 13, R. 19 E., Fresno County, has been extremely 
succfssful, each one producing not less than 100 barrels 
per day. A new pipe line is now being constructed from 
Coalinga to the oil wells in section 28, which will greatly 
facilitate the marketing of the product. Section 28 is gen- 
erally considered the banner section of this oil field. It has 
yet to know its first dry hole. In section 20 of this dis- 
trict (immediately adjoining section 28, where the Rock- 
Oil Company's eighty acres are situated) are the famous 
wells of the Home Oil Company, which have paid tremend- 
ous profits to the investors. The California Rock-Oil Com- 
pany has erected a 75-foot derrick on the northeastern 
extremity of its property. Three thousand feet of pipe 
have been connected with the principal water main, thus 
insuring plenty of water; and machinery to the extent of 
$3,000 has been installed. In order to finish the develop- 
ment work as soon as possible the company is offering 
stock at below the par value, at the offices of the com- 
pany in the Hearst Buildiug. The California Rock-Oil 
Company is a sister company to the Independence. Both 
companies, in fact, were organized aud are now managed 
by the same people. It is not unsafe to predict that the 
same profits that went with Independence stock will re- 
ward the investor in the Rick-Oil. The company cordi- 
ally invites investigation of its properties and the per- 
sonnel of the management. It has the location and the 
appliances, and will carry on its operations in a practical, 
common-sense way. The oil industry has attained to 
tremendous proportions in California during the last year. 
There has been a lot of talk in and out of the columns of 
the press, but there has been also a lot of oil, and a big 
profit for those who invested wisely. From present pros- 
pects the California Rock-Oil Cjmpany will add to the field 
for labor and investment. 

The latest report from John M: 
Another Representative Wright, President of the Peerless 
Oil Property. Oil Company, to the shareholders, 

must be highly satisfactory to the 
latter. The success of the company has been phenome- 
nal, and it should prove an incentive to the management 
of other concerns of the kind now struggling to reach a 
paying basis. The Peerless report shows that the com- 
pany is now well "on the velvet." Its pumping plant is 
completed and works well. The water supply is abun- 
dant. The six hundred barrel oil tank is in place and full. 
Wells Nos 3, 4, and 5 are steady producers, the rate at 
present aggregating one hundred barrels per day. All 
the product has been contracted for at good figures, for 
several months to come, and shipments are now being 
made at the rate of one hundred barrels per day. All 
shares of treasury stock have been suspended, and share- 
holders are advised to hold their stock for future profits. 

Mark L. Elliott has started work grading 
The Holmes at Belleville, Esmeralda County, Nevada, 
Tailing Plant. f° r h' 3 plant to work the tailings of the 
Holmes Mining Company. Mr. Elliott con- 
tracted for these tailings some time ago, but owing to a 
new arrangement in the macbicery to recover the values, 
work was unable to be started until now. Mr. R. F. 
Laffoon has charge of th* works at Belleville for Mr. 
Elliott, and Mr. Elliott will leave for there shortly. We 
are informed by parties well able to judge that Mr. 
Elliott's plan of treatment is an innovation for this class 
of work, and there seems to be no reason why he should 
not be successful in working the tailings to a profit. 

An Eastern contemporary which a few 

Some Eastern months ago was constrained to speak 

Expert Testimony, in uncommonly harsh terms about what 

is known as the May wood Colony of 
California has now arrived at the conclusion that the prop- 
erty Is all right, another case of miraculous conversion 
worthy to be placed on record with that of the late Saul 
of Tarsus. A ten-acre tract of land belonging to parties 
named Howard and Yost, situated near Los Angeles, is 
not treated so kindly. It is located by this expert critic 
nearly on top of the Coast Range of mountains with the 
cheering statement that "it would not sell to-day for one 
dollar per acre." 

THE Columbus Consolidated Gold Mining Company has 
levied an assessment of two cents per share, payable 
on or before August 15th. 




ftoE/to£ftr fu: 



1-2400 HORSE-POWER ENGINE AND DYNAMO. 

2-GENERAL VIEW OF ENGINE ROOM. 

3-50-TON ELECTRIC CRANE OVER ENGINE ROOM. 



4-BOILER ROOM. 

5-MAIN STATION BUILDING. 

6-SWITCH BOARDS: MAIN STATION. 




With S. F. News Letter, July 28, 1900 



July 38, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO JTEWS LETTER. 



«3 



Business on Pine street has been unutu- 
Th« Pin* S<rt»t ally dull for some lime past, nn one scem- 
Mark.t. log to take the slightest interest in the 

market, with little or no stork offering 
for sale. This stagnation can only be ascribed la the. 
situation at the mines, where what might be termed a 
transition period is now being encountered. The old sys- 
tem of work is practically dead, and the new has t 
been inaugurated. Until it is in operation, little can be 
expected in the way of activity in the share market for 
obvious reasons. Still, there is every reason to believe 
that the plans for future operation will prove more suc- 
cessful than under the old and out-of-date system. This 
affords an assurance which is doubtless fully recognized by 
the majority of Omstock shareholders, accounting in a 
large measure fr r the stubborn objection to dispose of 
stock, in face of the darkness which for the time being 
enshrouds the business. There would be little sense in 
sacrificing stocks now on the eve of changes which should 
put new life into the speculative market, and dealers are 
adopting the wisest course in simply maintaining their 
position, awaiting with patience the results of present 
operations in the mechanical branch of the industry. A. 
definite date for turning on the electric current at the 
works which will supply the mines, has not yet been set, 
but it cannot be far distant, and every effort is being made 
to expedite matters. Prices show little change one way 
or the other for the week. 

Some interesting work is now goiog 
More Outside Capital on in Shasta County by an Eastern 
Coming to California, company, with some Oakland people 
of good standing at its head, looking 
to the development of a group of mines, the ore of which 
is said to run very high in tellurium, which can now be 
worked with much success by modern methods. The prop- 
erty and its management seem to be well regarded in the 
East, and it is likely all the money necessary to equip and 
work it will be raised without difficulty. The ore is said 
to be phenomenally rich in tellurides. 

FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning July 20 th and 
ending July 26th. 

MISCEIIANEOUS BONDS 



Contra Costa 5% 2.000 @ 106% 

Los Aiiels Ky 5%... 6,000® 105-04% 
Market St. 1st Cons 

Mort'e 5 5,000 @ 118>£ 

Oakland Transit (,% 5.000 ® 115 

Oakland Gas 5 5,000® 11 Hi 

STOCKS. 



Oceanic Bonds 5%.. 10.000 @ 104K-105 
S F & S J V Ry 5%.. 5,000 ® 119% 

S P Branch 6 2.000 @ 132 

S P of Cal (1906) 6.... 3,000 ® UtH 
U.S. Bonds 3% 2,000® 109% 



H'st 

Mfi 
94% 

4 
49% 
10% 

5 



L'st Sugar Stocks. Shares. H'st J.'nt 
68% HanaP Co 100 



94% Hawaiian 125 

Honakaa 710 

4 Hutchinson 60 

49 Kilauea 215 

§y Makaweli 560 

48 ' 



MH 64 



Onoraea 230 

Paauhau S PI Co 385 

Banks. 

Bank of California 62 

First Na'tl Bank 14 

London, Paris & Am. 25 
Miscellaneous. 

86% Alaska Packers 94 

2% Oceanio S S Co 75 



*6 
32 

24?a 
19% 
46% 



87% 

24% 
19)1 
46 
, 26 
31% 31 



410 
274 
135 

117* 



412 
271 
135 

118 
92?i 



Water. Shares. 

Contra Costa Water... 225 
Sprine Valley Water. 211 
GAS and Electric. 

Equitable Gas 50 

Oakland Gas 255 

Mutual Electric 75 

Pacific Gas Imp'v'nt.. 180 

Gas and Electric 1365 

SFGas 100 

Street Railroads. 

Market Street 700 

Powdbbs. 

Giant 225 

Vieorit 1780 

The transactions for the week amount to 7,851 shares and 51,000 
bonds, against 4.848 shares and 80,000 bonds for the week previous. 

Lighting stocks have been freely traded in, and Gas & Electric has 
risen from 49 to 52%, closing to-day at 52% bid and 53 asked. 

Sugar stocks have been quiet, with prices rather lower than last 
week. Market-St. is strong at 64, seven hundred shares having been 
dealt in during the week. 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 

Asked Bid. 

.. 100 00 Sanitary Reduction 

Nev. Co. Narrow Gauge 

5 00 Railroad 14 50 

25 00 Abbey Land Imp. Co 1 00 

22 50 
Oil Stocks, 

50 Grand Central 95 

55 BiePanoche 

09% Bakersfield-Fresno 

Mining Stocks. 
Argonaut 4 00 J.a Fortuna 2 15 



American Liquid Air 

Golden Gate Beet Sugar 

Company 

Sea Power Co 

Union Sugar Co 

Sunset (original) 

Fresno- Alpha 

Mt. Diablo Oil Co 



Bid. 



Asked 
1 00 



75 
20 00 



Norton Sound 10 

25 Victor Gold Mines 

25 Columbus Con 

12% Lightner 86 

40 Sea Level 



15 
50 

25 



76 



Central Eureka I 10 

Dreisam , 

Dutch 

N. Light (Cape Nome).. 
Santa Rosalia (Mexico) ... 

Brunswick 23 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks (listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by 

Joseph B. Toplitz, Stock Broker, 
Member Producers' Oil Exchange, Rooms 9 and 10, 330 Pine street. 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 

The Organizers of the 

OPHIR OIL CO., 

Have arranged with the CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST COMPANY to hold sufficient securities in trust for the 
purchasers ot Ophir Oil Stock to INSURE HOLDERS OF THIS 
STOCK AGAINST LOSS. 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Company shall fail to produce oil 
in paying quantities sufficient to bring its stock to par value (one 
dollar per share), purchasers will receive back, with accrued interest 
THE ENTIRE AMOUNT PAID IN BY THEM FOR STOCK. 

The securities thus held in trust are adequate, and an investment 
in Ophir Oil Stock is as secure as a United States Government bond, 
and vastly superior to deposits in Banks of Savings, for the reason 
that it combines 

Absolute Security with 
immense possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "reading between the lines" in this 
proposition. Whatever happens to the Ophir Oil Company your 
investment is safe. You cannot lose. Only a limited amount of 
this SECURED STOCK is offered for sale. While it lasts it can be 



had for 



75c. per Share 



Fully paid and nonassessable. Sold only in blocks of $500 and up- 
ward. Common stock, unsecured, can be had at FIFTY CENTS 
per share in certificates of twenty shares and over. 

OPHIR OfTcOMPANY. 

Room 14, Fif i h Floor, Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 
Represented in San Francisco by J. P. MASSIE. 

London Oil Company 



Rooms 6 & 7, Eighth Floor, 
Mills Building,.S. F., Cal. 



Authorized Capital, $700,000 

San Francisco Nat'l Bank, Treas. 



75,000 Shares 

of the Treasury Stock have been placed 



on sate at only 



25c. per Share 

This Company owns 5000 acres at the junction of Union Oil 
Belt and Coalinga Oil Belt :::::::: 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS— C. H. Phillips of San Jose (Capitalist). 
President; ,T. M. GleaveB of San Francisco (U. S. Surveyor General), Vice- 
President; Hon, Jamea G. Magnire of San Francisco (ex-United States Con- 
gressman). Director; C. H. Dunsraoor of San Francisco (Secretary Bank 
Commissioners), Director; O.A.Lane of San Francisco (Secretary Fresno 
Alpha Oil Company), Secretary and General Manager. 

Western Mutual Investment Go. ™- «■*»!** 

$2 Per Month 
415-416 Safe Deposit Building-, Montgomery and California streets, San 
Pranolaeo. Agents Wanted. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 




COMMISSIONER Clunie threatens several large East- 
ern life insurance companies with expulsion from the 
State unless the questions, by them deemed impertinent, 
propounded by him at the beginning of the year, are 
answered without further evasion or delay. The majority 
of the foreign companies have satisfied the insurance com- 
missioner by furnishing information regarding the amounts 
paid for official salaries, the apportionment of surplus, 
etc., but there are a few companies that regard these 
features as concerning only the management, even though 
the business be conducted on a mutual plan. 

* * * 

The rumor published by Eastern insurance journals to 
the effect that the Metropolitan of New York is to re- 
insure the entire business of the Pacific Mutual, and that 
the latter company is to retire from business, is strenu- 
ously denied by the home company. The Metropolitan is 
one of the large Eastern industrial companies. Its agencies 
are found in every section of the Union, with the excep- 
tion of the Pacific Slope. Some time ago overtures were 
made by the Metropolitan to the Pacific Mutual people 
for the purchase of the i dustriil business of the latter 
company. The offer was flattering, but was declined. 
This fact probably accounts for the present story. The 
Coast field is not sufficiently large to justify its occupa- 
tion by two companies of this character. The Pacific 
Mutual was organized in 1868, and has in force $21,255,954 
of ordinary life insurance, $11,779,229 of industrial life in- 
surance, and $98,663,779 of accident insurance. 

* * * 

The semi centennial of the National Life of Montpelier, 
Vt., was celebrated with some festivity and much good 
will and genuine hospitality at its Green Mountain home 
last week. Representatives of the company, with their 
wives and daughters, were there from nearly every State 
in which it is doing business. The programme, extending 
through Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, included a 
formal reception by the officers at the home office building, 
a reception by President and Mrs. Charles Dewey at their 
home, a sail on Lake Champlain, a luncheon at Bluff Puint, 
N. Y., a dinner at the Pavilion Hotel in Montpelier, for- 
mal anniversary exercises at the county court bouse, an 
excursion to the Barre marble quarries, and a clam bake 
at Caledonia Park. At the suggestion of J. F. Makley of 
New York, a permanent agency asscciation was organized 
and a committee appointed to draft constitution and by- 
laws. Officers were elected as follows: President, George 
H. Olmsted, of Cleveland, O. ; vice-president, Fred L. 
Pleasants, of Richmond, Va. ; secretary, J. A. Wellman, 
Manchester, N. H. Meetings of the association are to be 
held annually, and much good is sure to result therefrom. 

* * * 

Charles McLane, agency director of the New York Life's 
Coast department, will return from a month's vacation 
next week. During his absence Mr. Redding has attended 

to the company's affairs. 

* * * 

L. B. Edwards, who has been associated with Joseph 
Conroy in the Coast management of the Manchester, Cale- 
donian, American of Newark, and American Fire, has re- 
signed. Mr. Conroy assumes the management and George 
W. Brooks continues as assistant manager. Mr. Ed- 
wards will either take the city agency of the companies or 
accept the management of the Review, an insurance 
paper formerly conducted by his brother, the late R. G. 
Edwards. 

* * * 

The political field is working along as it should among a 
few progressive and far-seeing underwriters. If we had 
a few more Duttons and Seatons, there would be fewer 
cinch bills, and less danger of same disgracing our statute 
books. 



The wave of adversity which last year overtook and 
knocked the profit out of the business of fire insurance *t 
every point east of Denver, has now reached the coast, 
and underwriters look forward to the certainty of realiz- 
ing a high loss ratio in tlis field during the present year. 
Two years of phenomenal losses will undoubtedly influence 
the withdrawal of several foreign companies from the 
United States and the retirement of a number of home 
companies from a business attended by such disastrous re- 
sults. The re-insurance of the Orient and absorption of 
the Palatine by the Commercial Union, can be traced 
directly to this prevailing condition. 

* * * 

Gossip has it that Edwards & Smedberg is a brand-new 
firm who will be candidates for local honors on the 1st 
prox. 

* * * 

The San Francisco Life Underwriters' Association failed 
to elect delegates to the National Association, which meets 
next month, the regular meeting of this month having 
been postponed until August. 

* * # 

There are all kinds of street rumors as to city agency 
changes, and following up the deposing of Edwards, there 
is further gossip as to possible general agency "mix ups." 
We are handicapped from mentioning names of either 
companies or their representatives, but look out for 
street surprises in short order. 

* * # 

July of the current year has kept up its record as the 
hottest month of the year. The losses to insurance com- 
panies aggregate over a million of dollars, and the end is 
not yet. 

> * * 

The Pacific Debenture Company (formerly the Pacific 
Mutual Debenture Company) has dismissed its injunction 
proceedings against Insurance Commissioner Clunie, and 
that State official will now dissect the corpse and send the 
remains to the Attorney-General for burial. Get from 
under! 

ft * * 

Fire losses in the United States for the first six months 
of 1900 aggregate $98,615,200. July is also on the ''firing 
line," and our Coast managers are fast losing their grip 
on current year's contingent. 

* * * 

The Boston Advertiser stands sponsor for the following: 
Put not your trust in kings, I've seen tbeir smiling faces, 
I hate the blasted things, they're always beat by aces. 
Misfortune holds the highest card where'er the human race is, 
Insurance is the proper guard, and here the proper place is. 

We can't imagine such a game in staid, sober and moral 
Boston. 

* * * 

We have seen, but the News Letter has not been 
favored with the Pennsylvania's souvenir of "Short 
Rates." It is a very creditable and spicy paper, and 
happily commemorates the Pennsylvania's seventy-fifth 
birthday. 

* * * 

Now comes Yuma with a $30,000 blaze, the third gen- 
eral fire in two years. Arizona seems to start the July 
perspiration away up here in San Francisco. 

* * # 

According to the Fire Patrol returns for the six months 
ending June 30th, San Francisco premiums held up toler- 
ably well, considering the general reduction in rates. 
Here are the comparative figures: Premiums six months 
June 30, 1899, $1,117,097; premiums six months June 30, 
1900, $1,113,202; decrease, $3,895. 

* * * 

Personal. — Manager Devlin of the Atlas is in Montana; 
Thornton Chase of the Union Mutual Life has been visiting 
San Francisco; D. F. Sullivan goes with the Travelers as 
special executive agent; Manager Watt has returned from 
a visit to New York; Manager H. McD. Spencer is in the 
Northwest; vice-President Levison of the Firemans Fund 
leaves for Europe ou August 6th; vice-President Faymon- 
ville of the Firemans Fund has returned from Chicago; 
Manager Shields of the Equitable is spending his vacation 
at Coronado; W. C. Leavitt, of the Union Mutual, is in 



July »8, 1900. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



'5 



the North; George W. Spencer has returned from % 
month's trip through Orejron and Washington; Clarence 
M. Smith is visiting the home cfflce of his company, the 
Northwestern Mutual Life of Milwaukee; Manager Ru- 
dolph Herrold of the Hamburg-Bremen Is in the North- 
west; Manager Dornin of the National and Springfield 
has returned from a visit to Honolulu; Colonel Kinne of 
the Liverpool and London and Globe will visit Lake Taboe 
next week in search of recreation; Frank Hanford of 
Seattle has been elected President of the Washington In- 
surance Association. 

THE University authorities at Princeton have made up 
their figures of applicants for examination in the 
various parts of the countrv to date. They are as follows: 
Full entrance Freshmen, 435; Preliminaries, 339; Upper 
classes, 11; total Diraber examined, 785. This is by far 
the largest number of applicants they have ever had at 
Princeton, and should make the freshman class about 400 
next fall. These figures do not include the large number 
of Post-graduates both from Princeton and other institu- 
tions. 

Ir yoa have suits, gowns, gloves, laces, tapestries, ribbons or any- 
thing else that requires renovation, send them to the Spautding 
Cleaning and Dyeing establishment, 127 Stockton street. Here things 
are cleaned in the most approved fashion. The best of workmen and 
apparatus are employed, and the prices are reasonable. Spaulding 
will make your husband's old suit of clothes look like new. 



A raw, coarse whiskey that burns and bites is the kind that kills. 
Whiskey should be soft and mellow with a bouquet like good wine. 
Such a whiskey is a legitimate tonic, nature's antidote for the wear 
and War of life. The Argonaut brand is of that kind. Notdrankards 
but drinkers drink it. The sole agents for the United States are 
E. Martin & Co., 54 First street. 



On all the Pullman cars Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey is to be had. 




Vd 



UARIN£ DEBUCMEinV 




Capital Subscribed $4,482,760 

LONDON ASSURANCE, oapitaipataup 2.241.376 

Assets 19,196,146 

Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. capitaipaidup 600,000 

Assets 2,602.060 




The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 

(Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders, $11,000,000 

Kilgabif & Bea vee, General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Vooqt. General Agent Accident Department. 

Pacific Mutual Building. S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, 12,250,000 Assets, 010,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Paoiflo [Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome streets. F. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMAMS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 3AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California street. S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 



c< 



insurance Company 



of North A 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital J3,000,noo 

Surplus to Policy Holders $5 022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up. $3,446,100 Assets, $24,034,110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $9,612,455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital. $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hookee & Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents 



413 California street. S. F. 



Connecticut F!re Insurance Go 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3.869.451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE tc CO.. Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, $3,000,000 Gross Assets, 812,808,395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, 87,631,926 
H, L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents, 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the" Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment of Losses 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 

N. r SCHJLESrNGER, City Agent 304 Montgomery street San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 



MAN AND THE CLOTHES, 



By JOHN A TAYLER 

SELF-SATISFACTION is the badge of the San Fran- 
ciscan. 1 do not mean the San Franciscan by habitat 
merely, but rather the insular individual who is prouder of 
being a Native Son than he is of being a man. 

Now your self-satisfaction is footless, sirs. It annoys. 
You are deficient variously, but I shall leave the task of 
castigating you on other counts to other scribes and con- 
fine myself to your profound unknowledge in the matter of 
clothes. You do not know how to dress. Mark the in- 
ditement, ye of the purple pugaree and patent leather 
shoel Dispride yourselves as you parade the pavements 
in your semi-simian array. You are caricatures every 
man ]ack of you. A composite of town and country; busi- 
ness and leisure; formality and informality. My editor 
would probably call you epicene. You go to your toil in the 
morning with a pugaree on your hat and your theatre in it 
the same night although you have been home to dinner 
and have probably changed your cuffs. You wear a pot 
hat with your "bird-coat" and a white "vest" with your 
"Tuxedo." You have a Raglan overcoat, which you mis- 
take to be fashionable, and you wear it in all weathers 
and at all o'clocks whether it be made of water-proofed 
covert cloth or camel's hair. These are but a few of your 
crimes. 

The pugaree (pronounced with the accent on the first 
syllable) may be worn property oniy in connection with a 
Terai hat and mufti in very warm weather; while in the 
country; from expediency while traveling, or, informally 
at race meets, polo games, etc. Its purpose is much the 
same as the turban's, that is, its thickness protects the 
head from the sun. And yet I have seen Peter Martin 
wear one with evening dress in mid-winter. Arthur Spear 
sports one in connection with a black cutaway. This re- 
minds me, too, that I saw him one foggy night some weeks 
ago with the skirts of his gloves turned back over his 
hands. He probably noted the custom in the East and 
thinks it the limit. As a matter of fact this manner of 
wearing gloves has been practisedin New York for anum- 
ber of years. Its object is to give ventilation to the hands 
when the weather is so warm that gloves become uncom- 
fortable. It was an expedient for the sake of comfort 
employed by men of leisure to whom gloves at all times 
are as essential as collars. It is a sort of semi-negligee, 
and as out of place in the presence of ladies as would be 
an unbuttoned waistcoat. 

I saw Sherrie Matthews, the farce-comedian, the other 
day with his gloves at half-mast. Time was when the 
negro and his imitator, the nigger-minstrel, were the arch 
foes of fashion. The thing adopted by them was banished 
forthwith from the gent'eman's wardrobe. If it were a 
matter of manners rather than material, as the holding of 
a stick or the method of raising the hat, it was imme- 
diately resigned in favor of the gentleman of color and 
cork. But the nigger-minstrels are among the lost tribes, 
and the farce-compdians have taken their place, both as 
purveyors of lower comedy and arbiters of sartorial bad 
taste. Noisy fun and noisy clothes always go together. 
I can not better advise those who would dress well than 
by charging them to avoid the characteristics of the varie- 
gated variety vandal. 

Under the new management of John F. Heintee] the Maison Riche 
is prospering handsomely and the good livers know where to go for 
a finely cooked and perfectly served meal, such as one gets in the 
best restaurants of Paris. The wines are the best brands in the 
world's market and the excellent viands and service together wilh 
the moderate prices conspire to make this restaurant one of the 
best in America. 

Camping locations, hotels, mineral springs, and resorts for all peo- 
ple at all prices, may be found along the line of the California North- 
western railway. The season is just right for a cool rest and recu- 
peration. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 
746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Cooper & Co., 



Don't sta't on your journey without putting a bottle of Jesse 
Moore "AA" in your grip. 



Artistic picture framing, reasonable prices, at Kennedy & Rab- 
ohn's, 21 Post street. 



Sducattonal, 



College San Rafael 

For Young Ladies 
Term begins August 6th. 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominic 
Full collegic course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
trade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthf ulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

Colletre San Rafael, San Rafael. Cal. 



Irving Institute. 



Boarding and day school for young ladies, 
2126 California street, will reopen AUGUST 
6, 1900. Accredited to the Universities : pri- 
mary department for children ; carriage will 

call. 

Rev. Edward B. Church, A. M., principal 



mm 



Business College 

2-1 Post street, San Francisco. 



Bookkeeping, business practice, 
shorthand, typing, languages, telegraphy, English 
branches, electrical, civil and ruining engineering, assaying, blow pipe, geol- 
ogy, mineralogy, surveying, mechanical drawing, etc.: 25 teachers; Individ' 
ual instruction; 200 graduates annually in positions; students can enter any 
lime. New eighty-page catalogue free. 



Mills College and Seminary. 

Grants diplomas and Confers degrees; seminary course ac- 
credited t'o the Universities; rare opportunities offered in 
music, art and elocution. Thirty - fifth year; fall term 
opens AUGUST 8, 1900. Write for catalogue to 
Mrs. C. T. Mills, President, Mills College P. O.. Cal. 



H. J. Stewart 



Teacher of Vocal and 
Instrumental Music 2 



Will resnrue instruction August 1, 1900 

Studio : 1406 Van Ness Avenue. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief 
of suffering humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest 
Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electrical apparatus, A 
Corps of well trained nurses of both sexes, skilled in all ftirms of 
treatments and manipulations, Rest Cure scientifically carried out. 
The Purest and best of foods manufactured and for sale. * * A 

?iuiet, home-like place, beautiful scenery, Mount Hamilton and the 
amous Lick Observatory in plain view; one block from electric 
cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city. Terms $10 to 
$20 per week, including medical attention and regular treatment. 
Garden City Sanitarium, East San Jose, Cal. 

CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 

Proprietors Fifth floor. Mills Building San Francisco 



Bitumen Mines 



Santa Cruz and King City, 
Monterey county, Cal. 



Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridges and railway construction, 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 



Weak Men and Women 



Should use Damlana Bitters, 
the great Mexican remedy: 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 

street, San Francisco. Send for circular. 



July 18. iqoo. 



S\N FBAXCm M v. S LETTKR. 



f^tjnnER Resorts 



The Nrw» Lrmsii Iim c«t»HI«h«I «l 1W oft; rrn. ■ 

trliaMe HurcAu <>| Information where »nymip Making Information, route* 
of lr«Tcl. »tir*ctlnn*. price* of entertainment. Ami nil other fad* that Are 
fi i o a— ry to m choice of a Summer Reeort may be obtained K»: 



RUBICON SODA SPRINGS. 

The waters of these springs possess raarvelmis 
curative properties, especially effective in the curt- 
of stomach, liver and kidney disorders, and are 
an absolute specific for rheumatic gout, nervous 
dyspepsia, and catarrh. 

Situated in the romantic Rubicon Valley, ten 
miles west of Lake Tahoe. 

Stage daily, connecting with steamer at Mc- 
Kinney's. Rates, f 2.00 per day, $12.00 per week. 
Table second to none. Altitude. 6000 feet. 



Now < »pen 



D. ABBOTT, Proprietor. 



THE TALLAC 



Lake Tahoe, Cal. 



Open for the season from May 15th. Give 
your family an entire change of climate. No 
more staging; railroad from Truckee to 
Tahoe. Dr. Pottenger, resident physician. 
For information, inquire of Traveler Bureau, 
20 Montgomery street, or address 



M. LAWRENCE X> GO- 



Tallac. 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural Mineral 
Steam Baths in . . 



Lake county 



Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. Andeeson, Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return 
reduced to $8. Send for circular. 

Full particulars at S. F. News Lettee, 5J4 Kearny St., 8. F. 



HOTEL BENVENUE and COTTAGES 

Lakeport, Gal. 

Lakepoet's Summer Resoet. Situated overlooking the shore on 
Clear Lake. New Pavilion, boatnouse, and bowling alley. Open all 
the year. Special facilities for accommodating families with child- 
ren; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and superior fishing. 
Lovely drives and walks. Rates, $7 per week. 

FRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS, 

SONOMA COUNTY, only 4% hours from San Fran- 
cisco and but 9 miles' staging: waters noted for medicinal virtues; best 
natural bath in the State; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at 
door; photographers' room, telephone, telegraph, daily mall: first-class 
hotel and stage service ; morning: and afternoon stages. Bound trip from 
San Francisco only 85.50. Take Tiburon ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3:30 p. m. 
Terms, 82 per day or $12 per week. References: Any guest of the past five 
years. Patronage constantly increasing. 

J. F. MULGREW, Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS VILLA 

Kent Station, Ross Valley, Marin Go. 

A popular summer resort, 45 minutes from the city ; salt water 
bathing, boating, fishing, etc. Terms reasonable; reduction to fam- 
ilies. For particulars, address 

Mes. E. Patterson, Proprietress. 
Take Sausalito Ferry. 



LAUREL DELL LAKE 



Lake County 



The most attractive place in Lake County 
to spend your vacation. Boating, bathing, 
bowling, tennis, livery, new walks, etc. 
Write for circular. 



M, WAMBOLD, 



Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 



HOBERG'S RESORT 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand five 
hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, lowest price. 
lirst-class family table and pleasant rooms, seven to 
eight dollars per week ; surrounding scenery unsurpassed 
by any springs in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. 
Buy ticket direct for Hoberg's, Lake county, Cal. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 



It is just lovely now at 

NAPA SODA SPRINGS 

No fogs; warm and bright. Swimming pool. 
Soda water baths. 

HOTEL VENDOME, San Jose. 

One of California's most attractive resorts. The 
starting point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly- 
kept and up-to-date hotel in CentrafCalifornia. 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San'Francisco, Cal., or address 



If 

You 
Knew 



"What a delightful time you could have at Hotel 
del Coronado, How Dear the mercury hovers 
around the 70 deg, mark day and night, week af- 
ter week, How many fish are wanting to be caught, 
And the pretty girls and beaux, with gamea, dan- 
cing, concerts, etc., you would come at once. 

Address, E. S. Babcock, Manager, 

Coronado Beach, Cal. 



THE CELEBRATED SISSON TAVERN 

Now open. Situated at the foot of Mt. Shasta, half a mile from 
the station. Free buss meets trains. Altitude 3500 feet. Fresh 
cream and dairy produce. Climate unsurpassed; average heat, 80 
degrees. Any one wishing to spend an outing in the mountains 
will find this a most desirable place. No poison oak. For further 
information, address Mes. L. M. Sisson. 

THE THOUSAND ISLAND HOUSE 

Thousand Islands, Alexan- 
dria Bay, NEW YORK 

The Thousand Island 
House is without doubt the 
most desirable and delight- 
ful summrr iesort in the 
countr y . A thoroug h 1 y 
modern and up - to - date 
house equipped with a 
large number of public and 
private baths, and lighted 
throughout with electric- 
ity. The region in which 
this hotel stands is one of 
those places nature seems 
to have created for the sole 
pleasure of man. The 
beautiful St. Lawrence River, with its current ever flowing to the sea, its 
more than "1000 islands," some large, some small. Nowhere in the country 
can fishing and boating be so thoroughly enjoyed. For fuller Information 
send two 2-cent stamps for illustrated booklet and rates, to O. Q. Staples, 
Riggs House, Washington, D. C, or Alexandria Bay, N..Y. 



k 

i% Ad 
jdfijB&BErjfls jjs I tf ^* ' tatty "3 



18 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



July 28, 1900. 




ONE of the most charming dinners of the year was given 
in Oakland last Saturday by Senator and Mrs. 
Perkins in honor of Speaker and Mrs. Henderson who 
have been visiting California and are at present in the 
Yosemite Valley. Tbe table decorations which were of 
red carnations and maiden hair ferns, were extremely 
pretty and artistically arranged and the menu was very 
elaborate. The guests entertained were Mr. and Mrs. 
Henderson, Miss Henderson, Judge and Mrs. McPherson, 
Senator Daniel of Virginia and his son, Hon. Julius and 
Mrs. Kahn, Mrs. G. H. Bew, Mrs. Sprague, Miss Mae 
Perkins, and George Bew. 

Angel Island, which in the past had such a record for 
continued entertainments during the regime of Mrs. 
Kautz and Mrs. Shatter has again come to tbe front. A 
delightful button tea was given there last Thursday which 
was very largely attended by the people from the different 
Posts, and civilians from the city. 

San Francisco society has the prospect of another wed- 
ding in the near future. The marriage of Miss Jessie 
Cheevers and Carey Friedlander will take place in this 
city instead of Los Angeles early in August and the family 
of the groom elect are gathering from their different 
points of summer outing, Catalina Island, Coronado, and 
the Klondyke, to be present at the ceremony. 

From Manila has come news of the marriage there on 
the 9th of June of Miss Elizabeth Egbert and Lieutenant 
Charles Evans Kilbourne, TJ. S. A. Another button wed- 
ding took place at Santa Barbara last Wednesday at noon 
when Miss Mabel Nixon became the bride of Lieutenant 
Harris Laning, TJ. S. N., who, as an officer of the Phila- 
delphia, was not unknown in San Francisco society. The 
ceremony was performed at the home of the bride in a 
little bower in which the National colors, carnations, and 
Lemarque roses were the component parts, placed in the 
beautifully flower decked parlors, and here in the presence 
of a few intimate friends the bride was given away by her 
father, Thomas Nixon. She was robed in white satin 
trimmed with tulle and orange blossoms and attended by 
her sister Blanche as maid of honor, who wore a gown of 
white faille Francaise; Lieutenant Raby was the groom's 
best man. A large reception followed the ceremony and 
the happy couple left in the afternoon for Petersberg, 111., 
en route to Washington City. 

San Rafael is doing bravely this year in the entertain- 
ing line; indeed, not for many years past have so many 
parties of one kind or another been given there as during 
the present season. Fairfax Villa is the popular place 
for dinners, and Mrs. Sam Buckbee is one of the most fre- 
quent hostesses in that line. Mrs. Kittle last week and 
Miss Cora Smedberg this week have given pleasant little 
dances, to which not only guests summering in the village 
were invited, but quite a number from the city were also 
present. 

The season continues lively at the Hotel Rafael. The 
hosts and hostesses are many, and the guests have every 
reason to be grateful. Among the most recent arrivals 
from San Francisco were: S. Carson, Mrs. G. E. Morse, 
Mrs. Clement Bennett, Miss Marie Dillon, W. F. Goad, 
G. Loughborough, F. C. Coakley, Miss C. A. Harper, E. 
B. Dreyfus, M. Bremer, L. M. Starr, J. M. O'Brien, Paul 
Cowles, C. Hardon, P. B. Collins, Miss Eleanor W. Mor- 
gan, J. M. Byrne, J. L. Seward, Miss Frances Steward, 
Dr. Edgar Dinkelspiel. 

Mr. Harold Sewall returned from his trip East in time 
to meet Mrs. Sewall on her arrival from Honolulu, and on 
Wednesday left for the Islands by the steamer Australia. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sewall were the recipients of many hospi- 
talities the past ten days. Last Saturday they were the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Monte Wilson at Burlingame. 
Mrs. Sewall will remain in San Francisco for several 
weeks, and then go East with her children to visit Mr. 
Sewall Sr. in Maine. 



Old-timers will no doubt be pleased to welcome back 
the popular Army beau of tbe "after tbe war" period in 
the person of Lieut. -Colonel J. H. Calef of the Third 
Artillery, who has been ordered to San Francisco, with 
the Philippines as his further objective point. 

Tbe beau monde is now flocking to Del Monte, and by 
the time the first of August arrives great will be the 
gathering of wealth and fashion beneath the roof-tree of 
that famed hostelry. The week of sports will of course be 
the chief attraction for the majority. Indeed the 
coming meeting at Del Monte of the Pacific Coast Polo 
and Pony Association is creating considerable talk in so- 
ciety and at the clubs. Last year's meet provided some 
of the best sport ever witnessed in America, and this sea- 
son promises to be even better. There will be two days 
devoted to racing, and the best ponies and tbe best gen- 
tlemen riders in California will participate for the Del 
Monte Cup. Walter S. Hobart, F. J. Carolan, Charles 
Raoul-Duval, Peter D. Martin, Charles Dunphy and others 
have high class thoroughbred ponies, and some are ex- 
pected from the Southern counties. The golf tournament 
will be under the direction of J. Downey Harvey. Base- 
ball, coaching, polo and tennis are among the sports 
scheduled for the week. 

What with polo practice and games, and swimming and 
the other sports, the guests at Del Monte are having a 
delightful season. Never, perhaps, in the history of the 
big hotel has tbe crowd been so great : and more 
are to arrive in the near future and for the week of fes- 
tivities. The following is a list of those expected: Miss 
Cooksey, Miss Parsons, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Walker and 
family, L. Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Schmieden and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Tubbs, Mrs. Edwin Barron 
and family, Mrs. A. L. jTubbs, Chapin Tubbj, Mr. and 
Mrs. Adam Grant, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. McCutcheon, 
Henry A. Butters and party, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Folger 
and family, Mrs. J. \. Folger, Mark L. Gerstle and fam- 
ily, Colonel and Mrs. Long, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Requa, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Fitzgerald, Mr. and 
Mrs. McNear and family, Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Bowels, F. 
W. McNear, Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Weil, Mr. and Mrs. B. 
Hart and family, H. R. Simpkins, Edgar Mills, F. S. 
Stratton and family, Miss Gregory, Rev. R. C. Foute and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Carolan, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. 
Crockett, Miss Crockett, Miss Edith McBean, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. P. Morgan, Miss Ella Morgan, Miss T. Morgan, 
Mr. W. H. Taylor, A. H. Taylor, Mrs. P. F. O'Brien and 
party, A. Schelien and family, F. Holdman and family, 
Miss Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar F. Preston, Mr. and 
Mrs. Mountford Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. George Pope and 
family, Mrs. F. F. Frank, Miss Eleanor Wood, Mr. and 

The summer is not over; it has only commenced, in fact; and 
now is the time to get to tbe cool fresh country. There are hun- 
dreds of places on the line of the California Northwestern Railway. 



Joly and August are favorite vacation months. Along the line of 
the California Northwestern Railway you will find ever so many 
lovely spots to rest and enjoy idleness and pleasure. 

Miss Louise Thiele desires a few more piano pupils. Experienced teacher: 
latest method; terms 50c. an hour; home evenings. 355 San Carlos ave., S. P. 



D f 



If you want ahealthy drink try Jesse Moore "AA" whiskey. 

A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 

fc R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 

CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckle". 
Moth Patches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and deties detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton fa patient): "As you # ladle* 
will UBe them. I recommend 'Oour- 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
alt the skin preparations." For sale 
by oil druaruistH and Fanoy-iroods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
87 Great Jones atreet, N. Y. 




July a8, 1900. 



sax 11: v rrr.H. 



Mid Mr-; - hmu, Mr. 

and Mr«. K A Bruguiere and family, Peter Marti 
Eleanor Martin, Prince and Princess Poniatowski, Miss 
Celia Tobln, General Shatter, Mrs. O. H. Bra, 
Bray, S. W. Bray, Mr. and Mrs. George A. Howard and 
family, and Barry X. Stetson. 

Since the establishment of the Tnited States Govern- 
ment weather station at San Diego, twenty-eight years 
ago. the thermometer has registered a temperature 
higher than fit) degrees but eleven times during the 
months of June, July, August and September. The ther- 
mometer has never been known to remain at any uncom- 
fortable warmth during any one day for more than a few 
hours. The temperature has not reached 90 degrees on 
any two consecutive days excepting twice in twenty-eight 
years, and never touched 90 in any July of that period. 
Since the thermograph was installed ten years ago, there 
has been registered a total of less than three hours of 
temperature above 90 during the imnths of June, July, 
August and September. 

Mr. and the Misses Godchaux and Mrs. E. G. Lyons are 
among the visitors at Paso de Robles; Mrs. Wm. Ellicott 
and her sister, Miss Fisher, are spending the summer at 
Sausalito. Owing to the fire at Castle Crag the Misses 
Lena and Susie Blanding and Mrs. E. B. Coleman have 
transferred themselves to Lake Tahoe, where they are at 
present. 

One of the happy features of summer life in Belvedere 
is the boating. By day and by night the guests of the 
Hotel Belvedere and the residents row and sail in the 
smooth waters of the lagoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lippman Sachs, Mrs. Heller, children and 
maid, Mr. and Mrs. Juda Newman, Miss Bowie, Miss 
Friedlander, Mrs. C. P. Mullens, Miss Mullens and Mrs. 
Charles Moses have returned to San Francisco after ex- 
tended sojourns at Hotel del Coronado. A. H. Payson, 
Miss Payson and maid and Edward Payson are late ar- 
rivals at Hotel del Coronado from San Francisco. 

Miss Wheaton and Mrs. Catherine Martin are in Ger- 
many, and will be joined at Paris by Mr. and Mrs. Sabin 
in September. 

THE popular $10 excursion to Lake Tahoe will be re- 
peated this Saturday under precisely the same circum- 
stances as last week. It is a splendid chance for a day's out- 
ing in one of the grandest spots on earth, and the extremely 
small cost places it easily within reach of the great major- 
ity of people. The cost of the ticket includes sleeping car 
in both directions, steamer trip around the lake, and a 
whole day among the lake's noted resorts. Opportuni- 
ties like this are none to common. Purchase tickets at 
the Southern Pacific's city ticket office, 613 Market street, 
San Francisco. 

Mother's Milk 
Is best for any baby, but after that comes Gail Borden Eagle Brand 
Condensed Milk for young infants. Thousands of letters are re- 
ceived telling of its successful use. Book " Babies " sent free. 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co., N. Y. 



A restaoeant that has its own distinct atmosphere and is known 
the country over for the excellence of its cooking and the quiet 
efficiency of its service is Swain's Bakery in Sutter street. For 
twenty years and more this restaurant has enjoyed an exclusive 
patronage. It has a character that is decidedly its own. Orders are 
taken for breads, pastries, ices, chicken sandwiches, etc. 

"This beats Paris I" exclaimed a globe-trotter the other night 
when for the first time he was entertained at the Cafe Zinkand. 
After the play is over everybody goes to Zinkand '3 to get the best of 
wines, beers and suppers and to listen to the inimitable music. 

Many people are returning to the city after sojourning at the 
various resorts along the line of the California Northwestern Rail- 
way, so that now there is plenty of room for those who failed to find 
accommodations earlier in the season. 

There are fashions in flowers as well as in other things, and 
Leopold the florist, 35 Post street, may always be depended on for 
the freshest and most fragrant. 

SOUTHFIELD WELLINGTON 

is the best coal for your range. 




BATTLE OF THE BUCKS. Size 20x15. 

Copy of one of the premiums given for the return of '■?"» 

QUEEN LILY SOAP wrappers. 



Amateur Sports 

To be held at the 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 
Aug. 13th to 20th, 1900 

Golf, Races, Polo For Special Cu p s and Furses 

Automobiles to the front 

The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 

The lightest, strongest cheapest and moat durable. It climbs the Bteepes 
irrades and is practicable on all kinds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants 

There is an active demand for the company's stock. 
There is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining 
A limited amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per share. Par value 810 
Full information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company . 

325 Parrott Bulldlne. San Francisco. Cal. S. GU0DEN0UGH, Secretary. 

THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moet& 
Cfrccndoa 

White Seal and Brut Imperial 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of 1893. 

Messieurs. Moet & Ohandon are the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, being used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionable functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuy vesant Fish affairs.— New York Wine Circular. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 
Pacific Coast Agents. 329 Market street. S. P. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 




HER MOTHER.— the independent- 

Within her fond, encircling arm 

Safe slept her little child— 
A helpless wight, sweet-breathed and warm, 
Her eager look down-bent to scan 

That face, all lovely innocence. 
The features of the full-grown man 

She seized on with prophetic sense — 
Foresaw the hero that should be 
Clothed in his manhood's majesty, 

And seeing, smiled. 

Relaxed in every massive limb, 

The man, sore wearied, sleeps; 
His bearded cheek is rough and grim. 
She, hovering near him wistfully, 

And gazing long, is fain to trace 
One line of childhood's purity 

In that toil-marred, world-hardened face. 
Now once again she feels and sees 
Her nursling warm upon her knees, 

And seeing, weeps. 



BANKING 



UNRESIGNED— ethel Patterson wriqht, in a handful of blossoms- 

It seems but yesterday, 
I begged to stay 

And play, 
A little moment more. 
The sun was scarcely down, 

The busy town 
Not hushed yet from the labors of the day ; 
It seemed too soon to put 
The toys away. 

To-day, an older child, 

I stand 
Upon the edge of Spirit Land, 
And watch the shadows fall. 
Father, again I pray 

To stay, 
It seems too soon to put 
Earth's joys away. 



THE OLD MAN AND THE LEAV ES.~auce lena cole, in the critic 

Behind, the cold blue blade of sunless seas, 
Before, a field bestripped of all its sheaves, 

And underneath the gaunt November trees 
An old man raking up the falling leaves. 

His back was bent, his head was hoar with rime,— 
A melancholy shape. I looked again, 

And then I saw that he was Father Time, 
And these the sons of men. 



LOVE'S HOUR-GLASS. — edward wilbur mason; in the home magazine. 



Eros I wherefore do I see thee, 

With the glass in either hand? 
Fickle god 1 with double measure 

Wouldst thou count the shifting sand? 
" This one flows for parted lovers— 
Slowly drops each tiny bead— 
That is for the days of dalliance, 
And it melts with golden speed." 

EFFROI D'AMOUR.— martha gilbert Dickinson, in harper's monthly- 



I shut my eyes- -so low the heavens leant 
Above my face in his, that nearer bent, — 
All past, all future swerving under me, 
Swift faintness of oncoming certainty — 

Then one slow kissl 
My own heart knocking: at my side, 
As did some reckless horseman ride 

To outstrip bliss 1 

LONELINESS.— Frances bacon paine, harper's monthly. 

The greatest height of loneliness and loss is not 
To stand alone and look ahead through empty years— 
But side by side to live with one who does not know 
The burden of your silences, your grief of unshed tears. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, 12,000,000 Surplus. $1,000,000 

Profit and Loss Account, January 1, 1900, 92,321,212 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President I CHARLES R. BISHOP, Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I I. P. MOTJLTON„...2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw &. Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louts— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev. — Agency of The Bank of California. London — Messrs. 
N. M. Rothschild A Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothsohlld Preres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto Oesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand, 

Letters of credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F, 

Deposits July 1. 1900, f26.952.875 Reserve Fund $218,593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 439.608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee. W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller. Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barlh, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San FranclBCO and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Coe. Sansome and Sutteb Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING, Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

IT. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly. Cashier; Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DlitECTORS-^John J. Valentine, Andrew Chrlsteson, Oliver Eldridge. 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan. President S. G. Mubpht, Vice-President 

George A. Story. Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,238,372.45 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000 000 00 

Deposits June 30. 1900 .28,938,395.12 

BOARD OF DLRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier. A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart, E. Rohte H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N. 
Walter. 

Continental Building X* Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital. .$10,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund.. .$210,000 
Pald-In-Capltal 1,600.000 Monthly Income, over 100.000 

Its Puepose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per oent. Interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Franolsco, Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin, Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker- Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Cobneb Market. Montgomeby and Post Sts. 

Pald-up-Capltal $1,000,000 

Wm. H. Obockeb, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

W. E. Bbown. Vice-President W. Gbbgo, Je., Assistant Cashier 

Dlreotors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E Brown. O. E. Green. G. W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker, G. W. Soott. 



July 38, 1900. 



SAN PRANCISCO NEWS I.F.TTIiR. 



31 




■■ 



unbeams 



BANKING 



itolri rion rniiTE*. 

— When the new minister, a handsome and unmarried 
man, made his first pastoral call at the Fosdicks, he took 
little Anna up in his arms and tried to kiss her. But the 
child refused to be kissed; she struggled loose and ran off 
into the next room, where her mother was putting a few 
finishing touches to her adornment before going into the 
parlor to greet the clergyman. "Mama," the little girl 
whispered, "the man in the parlor wanted me to kiss 
him." "Well," replied mama, "why didn't you let him? 
I would if I were you." Thereupon Anna ran back into 
the parlor, and the minister asked: "Well, little lady, 
won't you kiss me now?" "No, I won't," replied Anna, 
promptly, "but mama says she will." 

— "Yes," said the man after the nitro-glycerin explosion 
had scattered the remains of the well shooter over a large 
section of the petroleum region, "Doyle always was a cool 
one. I've seen him rattle over a stony road with a load 
of glycerin with no more care than if it had been a load of 
hay." "Well," said the coroner sadly as he thought of an 
escaped fee, "he may have been cool, but he never will be 
collected." 

— Arkansaw Justice (to spectator who has just en- 
tered)— Huck Buckleby, I fine you $10 for contempt of 
court! Buckleby — Huh, squire! I hain't said a word 
yetl Arkansaw Justice — I know it, but that thar hoss 
you traded to me last week has got a spavio, and this is 
prob'Iy the only chance I'll have to git even with you. 
Pork over, or go to jail I 

— We am told dat charity am a divine attribute, but de 
man who sets out to practice it soon diskivers dat it am a 
one-sided affair. De other feller looks upon it as a slick 
and easy way to gittin' sunthin fur nuthin', an' when 
choked off he feels he has bin robbed. Be charitable, but 
don't cut de bone off de meat an' keep a bucksaw an' a 
cord of wood on hand. 

— A man had just told a rather racy story. "I've read 
that somewhere," said a woman, in a heedless moment, 
who prides herself on her extreme propriety; "it's in 
'Merimee,' isn't it?" "No, ma'am, it's in 'Boccaccio.' " 
"Ahl then I haven't read it." 

— When a law went at it and made a distinction between 
lyin' an' perjury, it smoothed de road fur a powerful lot 
of men to dodge round de truth an' not suffer fur it. But 
fur dat distinction I doan' know how I'd eber worked off 
my blind mewl. 

— The clergyman's little boy was spending the after- 
noon with the bishop's children. "At the rectory," he 
said, "we've got a hen that lays an egg every day." 
"Poohl" said Master Bishop, "my father lays a foundation 
stone once a week." 

— Many a young girl makes the mistake of thinking 
that because she would die for a man, she truly loves him. 
In this restless, throbbing age it is necessary for her to 
ask herself in all seriousness, "Would I take in washing 
for him?" 

Artistic Hardwood Grlllos 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams Build- 
ing, N .E. corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 

THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. E. E.) offers 
Eastern passengers three elegantly appointed vestibuled express 
trains daily between Chicago and New York and Chicago and Boston. 
For sleeping car reservations and fall information address Jay W. 
Adams, Pac. Coast Pass. Agt., 37 Crocker Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



The improved machinery anil the expert workmen employed by 
the Spaalding Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, have 
done away with the horrors of carpet cleaning. Many persons put 
up with dirty carpets just because they dread the process of renova- 
tion and cleaning. At the Spanlding establishment the work is done 
with dispatch and thoroughness, and old soiled and dasty carpets 
are made to look like new. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorised Capital. »MOO.00r). Capital Subscribed «nd Fullr r»l«l. fe.UO.00) 

1IKAD OPnCB— 71 Lombard "Irecl. London. 

PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber ol Commerce Buildln,. 

TAOOMA BRANCH— 1302 Paoiflo Avenue. 

Bankers— Bank ol England, London Joint Stock Bank. Limited. 

Agent* Ami Correspondent*: NaT* YORK— J. P. Morgan A Co.; CHICAGO — 
Union Natl. mill Bank. 

This bank In prepared to grant letter* of credit available In anr part of the 
world and to transact every description of banking and ezohange business 

William Mackintosh. Manager. 

Bank of British Columbia 

8. E. cor. Bush and Sansome Sis. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St.. London. 

Capital Paid Up. 13,000,000. Reserve Fund. IBOO.OOO 

BRANCHES-Vlctorla, Vanoouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nanl- 
amo. Nelson Rossland, Sandon, British Columbia: Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial oredits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon Us 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, tin follows: 

New Tore — Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago — First National Bank: 
Liverpool — North and South Wales Bank: Scotland — British Linen Com- 
pany: Ireland— Bank of Ireland: Mexico — London Bank of Mexico: South 
America — London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney. 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. CoH. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital (2,500,000 Pald-TJp Capital, S2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, {925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— V) TbreadneodJo street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Agenoy of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 
Boulevard Polssoniere. Draw direct on the principal oitles of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, O. ALTSOHTJL, Managers. 

E. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis 1". Gowoill, Cashier P. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, $500,000 

DIRECTORS-James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, John Barton, O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel &, Co.; Chicago-Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London- 
Brown, Shipley & Co. PariB--Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 81,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 

PAID ON TRUST DEPOSITS AND SAVINGS. INVESTMENTS Carefully Selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. O, Rued, A. 
Sbarboro, F. C. Slebe, Albert G. Wleland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, Vice-President; H. 
Brunner. Cashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob, Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 AuBtln Friars, London, E, O. 

Paid Up $1,500,001' 

Reserve Fund... 700,00' 

A cents at New York— J. & W. Sel lernmn & Co. . 21 Broad street. 

The bank transacts a general banking; business, sells drafts, makes tele- 



Capital Authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 



graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LTLIENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 
directors. 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



8. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. B. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoOutehen 
R, H. Pease 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



China, the Dead Dragon 



Bury the dragon! Endure it no longer! 

No more shall we breathe its foul air of decay. 
Dead is the empire; with vermin 'tis reeking! 

On with cremation! Death breeds in delay. 
The Health Board of Nations must move to its duty ; 

'Twill make the old empire a land of new worth— 
A Labor of Hercules, more than Augean, 

To clear this putrescence away from the earth. 

Time has there been when that country was youthful ; 

Strong was its justice, in learning it led : 
Take of its grandeur the dreamy old story — 

Make it a monument over the dead. 

Still, we'll respect all the fame that is noble. 

Vegeance? Not that as we hollow the ™rave ! 
Char the dead carcass and cover it over ; 

End the old empire, its people to save. 
San Francisco, July 21, 1900. Thomas Nunan. 



THE greatest friend to crime is temptation. People 
are robbed daily in San Francisco, to say nothing 
about Oakland, and they never know just how it hap- 
pens. Theyeroawa^ to Dal Monte or the springs and leave 
at home behind them their valuables and papers and what 
not; or else they take them abng with them, which is 
equally absurd. There are a few knowing folk who keep 
the things they prize in a scientific strong box, such as a 
vault in the California Sife Deposit; but there are many 
others who invite thieves and plunderers by their own care- 
lessness. They are their own enemies, but friends to the 
daily papers. 

Deafness Cannot be Cured 
by local applications, as they cannot reach the diseased portion of the ear. 
There is only one way to cure Deafness, and that is by constitutional reme- 
dies. Deafness is caused by an inflamed condition of the mucous lining of 
the Eustachian Tube. When this tube eeU inilamed you have a rumbling 
sound or imperfect hearing, and when it is enirely closed Deafness is the 
result, and unless the inflammation can he taken out and this tube restored 
to its normal condition, hearing will be destroyed forever; nine cases out of 
ten are caused by catarrh, which is nothing but an inflamed condition of the 
mucous surfaces. 

We wlil give One Hundred Dollars for any case of Deafness (caused by 
catarrh i that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh Cure. £end for circulars, free. 

P. .1. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo, O. 
BSTSold by Druggists, 75c. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



Along the line of the California Northwestern Railway you will 
find all sorts of resorts to fit your taste and purse. There are 
springs, cooling-off places, camping spots, hunting ground— every- 
thing, in fact, that the vacationer can desire. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bcreau, 510 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political 
from press of State, coast and countryTel. Main 1042. 

Gas Consumers' Association, 316 Post street. Reduces gas bills 
from twenty to forty per cent. Electric and gas meters tested. 



MoTHEBS.be sure and use "Mrs. Wloalow'a Soothing Syrup' 
children while teethlntr 



for you 



G. W. McKEAND. 



Searcher of Records 

and Examiner of Titles 
to Lands in Alameda County 

Offices: 458 Eighth St., West of Broadway, OAKLAND. 

H. Isaac Jones, M. D. E „. Eap , Nose , and Throat . 

Office — 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. P. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 



Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Main 101. 



C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS^^ 

Mo. 532 GLA> STREET, 8- F. 

Samuel N. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, Sftn Francisco. Cal 



Stocks 



July 28, 1900. 

Grain 



C. E. Mackev & Co. 

Investment Brokers 
32 Broadway New York 



Bonds 



Cotton 



San Francisco ^ m - Larsen - Mana g er 



Novelty Leather Co. 



Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladles' and Gents' 
Pine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sporting Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical, Surgical and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 9-1 

San Francisco 



George Goodman 



Patentee and manufacturer of 



Artificial stone 



(SchilHnger's patent) In all its branches: sidewalk and garden walk a 
specialty. Office: 307 Montgomery street. Nevada block, San Francisco 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the six months ending Juno 30, 1000, a dividend of 12 per cent, per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, t; per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliver Eldridge, President. William Corbin, Secretary. 
Office: 222 Sansome street. San Francisco. Cnl. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending June 30, 1900, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, July 2. 1900. 

GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 
Office: 33 Post street. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending June 
30, 1900, at the rate of three and one-quarter (334) per cent per annum on all 
Deposits, free of taxes, and payable on and after July 2,1000. Dividends 
not called for arc added and to bear the same rate of-dividend as the principal 
from and after July 1.1900. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Cal 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors, held on July 3, 1900. the 
regular quarterly dividend of 81.50 per share, being No. 6G. was declared, 
payable on and after July 16, 1900. E. E, SHOTWELL, Secretary. . 

ANNUAL MEETING 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works. 
The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Risdon Iron and Locomo- 
tive Works for the election of Trustees for the ensuing year, and the trans- 
action of such other business as maybe brought before the meeting, will 
be held at the office of the company, southeast corner of Scale and Howard 
streets, San Francisco. Cal,, on 

MONDAY, THE 6th DAY OF AUGUST. 1000, 

at 11 o'clock a. m. L. R, MEAD, Secretary. 

Office— Southeast corner of Beale and Howard -Sts.. San Francisco. Oal, 

Worthington Ames 

Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Halt) 



July 38, iqoo. 

•THE SPOOK IN 

THE CLOSET." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LKTTF.lt. 



»3 



DOROTHY came into the library 
of our attenuated series of con- 
nected closets, described by the agent 
as an "elegant suite of modern apart- 
ments," sat down hard on the box 
couch which conceals her best gowns, 
and said: 

"Ted, I'm discouraged." 

"Why?" I asked, looking over the 
top of my paper. 

" Bridget is going," answered 
Dorothy, dismally. 

" Plague take the cooks. She only 
came Monday," was all I could say. 

We had been flat-keeping only a 
little over a year, and during all that 
time had suffered from a malignant 
attack of maid. Twenty-one varieties 
had come with a smile from the intelli- 
gence office, and after a brief period 
of activity in our kitchen (our record 
was three weeks and four days) had 
departed with a sulky, uncompromis- 
ing "Good-bye, mum." 

Their excuses had ranged from a 
dead aunt to a desire to visit aged 
parents in the old country. 

"Well, what are we going to do?" 
I asked, after a solemn silence. 

"I don't know," sighed Dorothy, 
rolling up a cushion and sticking it 
under her elbow. 

" Do you think, dear," I asked cau- 
tiously, "that you manage the maids 
just right?" 

"Manage them!" said Dorothy, 
sitting up straight. "I manage them 
just as Bess Parker manages hers. I 
don't manage them at all. I get down 
on my knees to them. I wade through 
dust. I answer the bell half the time 
myself. They get their afternoons 
out and Sunday evening besides, for 
we always get tea ourselves on the 
chafing dish. I can't see that it's 
any more my fault that we have these 
lightning changes in the kitchen than 
it is yours." 

" It can't be my fault, I seldom see 
them," I argued, and then seeing that 
Dorothy was hart, added: 

"It's nobody's fault. It's simply 
downright hard luck. But we must 



A voted exclusivity to liie work ol die 

Haw England 
Conservatory of Music, 

Boston, Mass. 

Accessible to musical events of every nature. The 
best masters in music, elocution and languages 
that money can command. 

~ Geo, W. Chadwick, 

Musical Director. 

Prospectus 

~ sent 

free. 

Address 




MENTAL 

NUTS 



CAN YOU CRACK 'EM? 
A. book of 100 catch or 
trick problems. Real 
brain ticklers. Mailed 
for 10c. in stamps. Home 
Supply Co., 132 F Nas- 
sau St., New_York. 




r. ■-- . Mut 



ylactic Tooth Brush 



do something to-day. What do you 
say to me trying to find a maid?" 

) ahead," said Dorothy, "and 
good luck to you. I'll have the fun of 
finding fault with you inside of a 
week." 

* » * * 

The intelligence office was closed, 
but I found the manager and got the 
address of a maid he said was just the 
sort we wanted. 

She turned out to be a hardy look- 
ing individual, too old, I thought, to 
have any parents this side of the 
grave, and her unemotional counten- 
ance led me to think that she would 
not become completely prostrated 
in the event of a sudden death among 
her relations' offspring. After the 
preliminary skirmishing had been ad- 
justed, she looked me over from head 
to foot with one long searching gaze 
and asked: 

" Have yez any children?" 

"No," 1 answered. 

" Do yez keep dogs?" 

"No." I was beginning to get 
nervous. 

" Then I'll go," she announced ab- 
ruptly. 

* * * * 

Dorothy met us at the door, and 
after turning over my find to her I 
went off to enjoy a pipe, well pleased 
with my morning's work. 

"How do you like my maid?" I 
asked Dorothy, when she came into 
the library just before luncheon. 

"She'll do," answered Dorothy, 
"but she is as queer as gimlets." 

" She's not going?" I ejaculated in 
alarm. 

" No; but she has all the symptoms. 
She seemed pleasant enough when I 
told her about the work. Then I 
took her into her room and showed 
her where to hang her clothes, and 
left her changing her gown. When I 
went in just now she looked persim- 
mony and none too cordial." 

"It's your imagination," I sug- 
gested. "That's her way." 

"It's been the way of twenty- two 
of there," said Dorothy, warningly. 
"You can't fool me when it comes to 
diagnosing a cook's looks." 

In the afternoon Dorothy and I took 
a long walk in the park to get up a 
good appetite for dinner. We came 
home through the brisk cold twilight, 
keen for our dinner and looking for- 
ward to a quiet, comfortable evening. 

"I wonder why Katy hasn't lighted 
the gas," observed Dorothy, as we 
entered the hall. 

"She's been too busy with that 
turkey," I remarked, hanging up my 
coat. 

Dorothy went back to see that the 
dinner was progressing before we 
dressed, and a moment later I heard 
her calling; 

"Ted, Ted, come here, quick." 

"What's the matter?" I shouted, 



running down the hall. 

"Nothing," said Dorothy, turning 
up the gas, "only Katy has gone." 

"Well, I'll be- — " 

" Don't swear," interrupted Doro- 
thy. "Read that." 

She handed me a piece of paper 
that she bad found on the table, im- 
paled on the tines of a carving fork. 
It read: 

" The place don't suit." 

"Dorothy, this kitchen is be- 
witched," I remarked with emphasis, 
after the most violent of my feelings 
had been relieved, silently. "There's 
a spook here somewhere. Something 
drives our maids away. It will drive 
me to drink if I don't find it. I'm go- 
ing to investigate." 

I took a candle and examined the 
dumbwaiter and all the tubs, but 
there was nothing spooky about the 
kitchen except the turkey hanging by 
the heels at the window. The door of 
the servant's bedroom stood open and 
inside everything was orderly and 
very commonplace. Hooked into the 
closet, and finding nothing, was about 
to close the door, when some writing 
on the under side of the first shelf 
caught my eye. Holding in the candle 
to get a good light, with Dorothy 
looking over my shoulder, I read this 
terse warning to members of the 
Cook Fraternity: 

" The Missus is 0. K. The Mister wears 
shirts with collars onto them. He has six a 
week. He kicks if they ain't stiff. Better 
git. Jane O'Hoolksan." 

"There's our spook," I said. — 
Robert Alston Stevenson, in Life. 

— Blobbs— She's alone widow, isn't 
she? Slobbs — She isn't half as much 
alone as she was before her husband 
died. " 

i.a.=».«.a3/.3/.2/.i/.!/.J.i/.-J.21.3/.3f.3/.3/.3/.2(.2/.2/.3/.2/.3/.3^ 

S®^rNrA*%/ikK Sir. 50 



^TmV 1 Stylish $ 




15 



A^i Suits 

Dressy nuits $20 

Pants $4. SO 

My $25.00 Suits are the| 

best in America. s 

/ Z ling your suit made byS 

JOE POHEIM 1 

THE TAILOR « 

£a Samples Sent 1110-1112 Market St. § 

§ "" 201-203 Montg'y St.. S. F.g 

v-'-ffi'ffi:ffi'«ysyE-/E'/s-«yE'/EyE-/5yE7E:/E7EyE>syE-/E'/EjEyE« 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



July 28, 1900. 



Southern Pacific Co. --Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line, Foot ol Market Street] 



leave] From July 15, 1900 [arrive 

•7:00 a Benlcla, Suisun, Elmira, Vacaville.Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 p 
*7:00 A Shasta ExpreBS— Davis, Williams (for Bartlett Sprints), Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff, Portland *7:45 p 

*7:30a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calls toga, Santa Rosa..... *6:15 p 

*8:00 a Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing, Marysville, Oroville *7:45 p 

•8:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East *11:45 A 

*8:30a San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone. Sacramento, PlacervtUe. 

Marysville. Chlco, Red Bluff. *4:15 P 

*8:30a Oakdale, Chinese (for Yosemlte), Sonora, Carters *4:15 p 

*9:00 A Hay wards. Nil es. and way stations '''11: IT. a 

*9:00a Los Angeles Expre u B — Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced and Fresno *6:45 p 

* 9:30a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations *5:45 P 

•IO.-OOa The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago *5:15 p 

*11 :00 a Nlles, Livermore, Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Haniord, 

Visalla.Porterville *4:15 P 

*12:00m Hay wards, Nlles, and way stations *2:45 P 

tl."00P Sacramento River Steamers I 5 .* 00 A 

*3:00p Haywards, Nlles and way stations *5:45 P 

*4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Calistoga, Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

•4:00 P Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento, Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysville. Oroville '10:45 a 

•4:30 P Nlles, San Jose, and Stockton *7:15 p 

*5:00 p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfield, Saugus lor 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles *9:45 a 

*5 :00 p Fresno Passenger — Martinez, Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, 

Berenda (Raymond for Yosemlte). Fresno *12:15 p 

*5:30 P New OrleanB Express— Bakersfield. Santa Barbara. Los An- 
geles, Demlng. El Paso. New Orleans, and East *8;45 A 

*6:00p Haywards. Nlles, and San Jose *7:45 A 

t6:00p Vallejo *12:15 p 

*6:00p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne. Omaha. Chicago *11:45 A 

*6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden. Denver. Omaha, Chicago *4:15 P 

£7:00 p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations J9:55 P 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding. Portland Puget Sound and East *8:15 A 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

|7:45 A Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa Cruz & Principal Way Stations t8:05p 
*8:15A Newark, Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and waystations *620 p 

T2:15p Newark, Centerville. San Jose, New Alraaden. Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:50 a 

•4:15 p Newark. San Jose. Los Gatos t8:50 A 

a4:l5p Qlenwood. Felton. Santa Cruz C8:50a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco — Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
a. m., tlrfX). *2:00. 13:00, •4:00. t5:00and*6:00 p. h. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— •6:00, 8:00. 10:00 a. m.: {12:00. *1:00 
J2:00. *3:00. J4:00. *5.-00 P. M. 

TCoabt Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

t6:10A Ocean View, South San Francisco t6:30 p 

t7rfK)A San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

j7:30a Sunday Excursion for San Jobc Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove 

and Principal Way Stations t8:35 p 

•9:00a San Jose, TresPinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove. PasoRobles, 

San Luis Obispo, Surf. Lompoc, and principal waystations °4:10 p 

•10:40 a San Jose and way stations *6:35 a 

•11:30 A San Jose. Los Gatos and way stations *5:30 p 

t2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara. San 

Jose. Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl0:36 a 

t3:30p SanJoseand WayStatlons *7:30 p 

t4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:45 a 

t5:00p San Jose. Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations +9^)0 a 

*5:30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations t«:35 a 

•6:30 p San Jose and Way Stations t«:00 A 

6ll:45p SanJoseand WayStatlons *7:30 p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. •Daily. t Sundays excepted. 

(Sundays only. 6 Saturdays only. 
a Saturday and Sunday. c Sunday and Monday 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m„ for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hioeo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on'day of sailing. 

Coptic (via Honolulu)..., Thursday. July 26. 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. August 21, 1900 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday. September 15, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Wednesday. October 10, 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office. No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STTJBBS. General Manager. 



SS "Alameda," Wednesday, Aug. 8. at 8 p, m. 
S3" Australia," Wednesday. Aug 22,1900. 2 pm. 
Line to Coolgardle, Australia, and Cape town, South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS A BROS CO 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office. 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 




City Index and Purchasers' Ouide. 

RE8TATJ RANTS. 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N. E. corner Eddy and Mason streets, 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Bbun. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval ; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314-316-318 Main St. 
Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, cannere, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tailers, etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 



Brush Manufacturers. 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco. Tel. 5610 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. TibueonPeeet— Foot ol Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00.11:00 A. m: 12:35, 3:30, 5:10, 630 p. m. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30 p. m. Saturdays— Extra tiipB at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p. H. 
SUNDAYS— 8*10. 9:30, 11 MO A. m.; 1 :30. 330. 5*0, 6:20 p. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50.9:20,11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 3:40, 5:15 P. M. Saturdays— 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6 :35 p. M. 

SUNDAYS— 8 :10, 9:40. 11 :10 A. M.; 1 :40, 3:40. 5 :05, 6:25 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule aa above. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect April 15, 1900 
Destinations 


Arrive in San Francisco 


Week days 1 Sundays 


Sundays 1 Week days 


7:30 AH 
3:30 PM 
5:10 PU 


8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 PM 


Novato 
Petal u ma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 am 

6:05 PM 
7:35 pm 


8:40 am 
10:25 AM 
620 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyservllle, Cloverdale 


7:35 PM 


1025 AM 
620 PM 


7:30 AM 1 1 u , * tth„i. 1 10 =25 AM 

3:30 pm I 8:00 AM I Hopland. TJkiah | 7:35 PM | 6£0 PM 


7:30 AM 1 8:00 AM 1 OufirnflHllP 1 7|35 PM 1 10:25 AM 
3:30 PM I ! UuernevUle j | 620 PM 


7:30 am 1 8:00 am I Sonoma 1 9:15 AM 1 8:40 AM 
5:10 pm ! 5:00 pm 1 Glen Ellen | 6;05 PM | 620 pm 


7:30 am I 8:00 am 1 o^Koa^nni 1 10:40 am 1 1025 am 
3:30 pm | 5:00 pm I seoastopoi | 7;35 pM | 6;20 pM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Fulton for Altruria: at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Kelseyville. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at TJkiah, for Viohy Springs, Saratoga Springs, 
Blue Lakes. Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Lierley's. Bucknell'e. Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville, Booneville, Phllo. Christine Soda Springs, Navarro. Whites- 
boro. Albion, Little River. Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, 
Westport, TJsal Willlts. Laytonville, Cummlngs, Bell's Springs, Harris, 01- 
sen's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass Agent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf. San Franolsco. 

^^_^ For Alaskan ports, 11 a. m.: July 5. 10. 15. 20. 25, 30. 

f^P> BV August 4, change to company's steamers nt Seattle. 

P^HI For B.C. and Puget Sound Port*. 11a. m., July 5.10.15- 

I^Wmi 20.25,30, August Land every fifth day thereafter. 

jCrflKI For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. m.. July 2, 7. 12. 17.22. 

i^^mK 27. August 1, and every fifth day thereafter. 

^^^^ For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 A. M.. 
July 2. 6. 10. 14, 18. 22. 26, 30. August 3, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford (San Luis Obispo). Santa 
Barbara, Port Los AngeleB, Redondo, (Los Angeles* 11 A. M.. July 4, 8. 
12, 16. 20. 24, 28. August 1, and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 A m., 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
GO0DALL. PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts.. 10 Market St.. San Francisco 

Only railway owning Its own tracks between San Francisco 
and Chicago, 2550 miles. Personally conduoted excur- 
sions in Pullman Tourist Sleeping Cars, three times every 
week to Kansas City, Chicago, and all points East. Get 
handsome folders, rates and full information at 628 Mar- 
ket street, San Francisco. 





ESTABLISHED JULY 30. 1854 



Anmual 9 n i m r i f4—m. M.W 



I|E'Tter 




Vol LXI 



SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST 4, 1900. 



Number 5. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIoTT 
&H Kearny street. 8*n Francisco. Entered at San Francisco Fost- 
offlcc as Second-class Matter. 

Theoffleeof the B. F. NEWS LETTER In London. Ens., i* at 10 Lcadcn- 
hall Bldff, No. 1 Lcadenhall street. - Fred. A. Marriott. Representative 1 
where Infornialion may be obtained regarding subscriptions and 
advertising rate*. Paris, France. Office, No. 37 A venue do L'Opora, 

All social Items, announcements, advertising, or other matter. Intended, t.tr 
publication In the current number of tho XEWS LETTER. should b« 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 



B 



ADEN-POWELL seems to have acquired a taste for 
being besieged. 



T 



ftPPARENTLY the escape of James Taylor Rogers 
from jail was premature, possibly temporary. 

HE crime of being a king apoears in no measure miti- 
gated by the circumstance of being a good one. 

TEDDY Roosevelt appears to find the cowboy style of 
hat particularly advantageous to talk through. 

THIS Government has been a little slow to lose faith in 
China, but on the Pacific Coast there was no faith to 
lose. 



STATE of mind which drives a man to kill himself be- 
cause be fears to die, can hardly be regarded as logi- 



ft 

cal. 

THERE is no doubt but that the powers are putting 
so many men into China that somebody is bound to 
get licked. 

LAWYER Chretien is now at the stage where he asks 
for time. A little later he will, in probability, get 
more than he wants. 

" JIMERICANS must not ship arms to China" declare 
iL the authorities. And if a way can be devised for 
makiog the trade unprofitable, they won't. 

WHILE foreign ministers in China are being held as 
hostages, it would be satisfying to know whether or 
not they are held at an undertaking establishment. 

ENGLAND seems as ready to hang a few Oriental 
statesmen as Uncle Sam to drive Aguinaldo from 
public life; also to be hampered by similar difficulties. 

TO the charge of having stolen a cipher the Chinese 
diplomatist can respond: "A cipher? That's noth- 
ing." For the Chinese is quick to grasp the subtleties of 
English. 

RNNOUNCEMENT that Santa Teresa, the so-called 
saint, is in San Jose, is fairly good evidence that she 
is elsewhere. Not, however, that the matter is of any 
importance either way. 

THE fact that Chinese telegraph lines carry no more 
messages is not expected to affect the news output 
from the Orient. Most of it is carried to these shores 
now by the wireless system known as telepathy. 

NO motorman can be so thoughtful nor so quick as to 
divest of all danger the position of the person who 
steps directly in front of a rapidly moving car. Every 
time there is a maiming or a death, the motorman is 
blamed, whereas he probably put forth every effort to 
avert catastrophe. It is impossible for him to ring a bell, 
attend a crank, operate a fender, and at the same instant 
put brains into the head of a pedestrian who looks one 
way and walks another. 



AMONG the mistakes of the late director of posts in 
Cuba, there seems to have been that of not stealing 
everything in sight. Perhaps he did not thus err by in- 
advertance; the post-office buildings are not portable. 

FEMALE nurses with a fair understanding of the Chi- 
nese character will not be clamoring for service in 
the new field. Such a nurse among Chinese soldiery would 
have no more chance than a nigger in New Orleans. 

THE hunter who cannot distinguish his friend from a 
four-pronged buck is more than usually deadly this 
season. His accuracy of aim is particularly marvelous, 
when the fact is considered that if any deer were really 
to appear he would miss it. 



IF Governor Goebel really was removed by the act of 
God, as seems to be the idea of the defense, a rifle does 
not strike the judgment as having been an appropriate 
instrument. Lightning, a cyclone, apoplexy, or the kick 
of a mule, would have been regarded as more promotive 
of faith. 

FOOR Queen Margharita I Do her thoughts stray back 
to that wedding day when the blithe young Princess 
of Savoy was recklessly happy? She had escaped a dreaded 
foreign alliance, she was being received into the family of 
loving relatives, to live among those of her own race and 
own tongue, and her bounding heart could scarce contain 
her gladness. "I may not dance in this dress," quoth the 
merry princess, holding out her ceremonial skirts ruefully; 
"it would be improper to dance in this dress, but oh, how 
I want to dance for joy I " There is a popular superstition 
that a merry bride makes a sad wife — in this case it is a 
sad widow. 

A REWARD of $100,000 for the conviction of the mur- 
derer of Goebel cannot fail of securing the conviction 
of somebody; that the unfortunate may not be the guilty 
one is readily understood. There, are detectives who 
would swear a life away for a thousandth part of this 
sum, creatures who can be hired to commit perjury for 
the price of a drink, and men who would as lief swear to 
a lie as to the truth. Such a prodigal reward must have 
the effect not of checking crime but of promoting it. It 
is as much an incentive to new crime as a menace to the 
criminal sought. No such fortune will ever have to go 
a-begging. Either it will be claimed by some one who 
has earned it according to the terms of the contract, or 
it will be claimed by pretenders on the altar of whose 
greed there must be a sacrifice. 

JOSEPH PECKERMAN, convicted of pool-selling and 
sentenced to pay a fine of $250 or go to jail, need not 
come to the News Letter for sympathy. He was served 
rightly. The nerve of the pool-sellers has been phenomenal, 
as has their success in evading the law which clearly de- 
fined their calling as a crime. The pool-rooms of this city 
have never done anybody any good. They have been 
traps to the unwary, ruin to the weak. The claim that 
they keep money in circulation is all bosh; they do not 
create money, nor recompense honest toil. On the con- 
trary the cash they get ought for the most part to go to 
the butcher and the baker where it would circulate just as 
freely as in the illegitimate channels of the Tenderloin. 
The pool rooms encourage vagrancy, theft, ruffianism and 
general deviltry. No defense for them was ever advanced 
nor ever can be. Of course there was an appeal taken, 
but no convicted rogue, with the price about him, ever 
failed to take an appeal. It signifies only that the pool- 
seller is trying to postpone an evil day. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



August 4, 1900. 



THE ASSASSINATION OF THE KING OF ITALY. 

ONE more monarch has fallen a victim to the savagery 
of an anarchist. How long, oh Lordl how long is this 
kind of brutal butchery to continue? The rulers of nations 
are but what their people make them. They could not 
wield the sceptre power unless it were the will of a 
majority of their countrymen that they should. Strange 
to say it has only been the mildest and best of rulers who 
have been selected as victims for the assassin's knife or 
bullet. Good Queen Victoria has been attacked four or 
five times during her long reign. The amiable Prince of 
Wales was fired at the other day whilst passing through 
Belgium in a railroad car, and it was owing only to the 
bad marksmanship of his assailant that he escaped with 
his life, and yet a Belgian jury has acquitted the avowed 
anarchist and would-be murderer! Only a few months 
ago another avowed anarchist cruelly murdered Empress 
Augusta of Austria, whose whole life has been spent in 
acts of charity amoDg the poor. The life of her slayer 
was saved by the undue clemency of the laws of Switzer- 
land where the murder took place. A year or two ago 
Carnot, the popular President of Prance, was despatched 
by a bullet fired by an Italian anarchist. Only a few 
years since, the Czar of Russia, who liberated the slaves, 
was horribly mangled by a bomb thrown by a nihilist. 
Nor has this class of crimes been confined to the old world 
monarchies. Our most beloved of Presidents, Abraham 
Lincoln, was shot to death whilst placidly listening to a 
play. President Garfield was shot down at a railroad 
station and subsequently died. President Borillas of 
Guatamala met a like fate. President Dias, who has up- 
lifted Mexico, and given it a standing and a prestige 
among the nations it never possessed before, barely es- 
caped with his life. And now the brave and noble King of 
Italy is killed without warning whilst receiving the cheers 
of thousands of his people. His slayer, Brassi, was a 
resident of New Jersey, and was married to a Chicago 
girl. He belonged to an anarchist society at Paterson, 
N. J., and went to Milan to commit the atrocious deed. 
On the receipt of the news of the success of his exploit, 
the society held an open meeting, thanked Brassi for his 
courage and steady aim, resolved to help him, and de- 
clared that every monarch in Europe would fall if he were 
hurt. This is free speech with a vengeance. Ought it to 
be tolerated in America? We think not. The time has 
fully come when the powers should concert measures to 
rid every civilized land of anarchy and monarch murder. 



WHY NOT GROW AMERICAN TEA? 

FEACE, or no peace, why not grow our own tea? The 
probabilities are that we shall either have to do that 
or go without. Japan, Ceylon and Indian would not leave 
us altogether without the means of concocting our favorite 
beverage, but the supply will not nearly equal the world's 
demands. Whilst this is so, we can as certainly grow tea in 
parts of this country, Cuba, Porto Rico, and the Philippines, 
as they can in China. We have Chinese laborers enough 
among us to show the way, and thousands of native sons 
eager to learn. The plants will grow in the South, and, 
it is believed, in parts of California. There are healthy 
and sturdy bushes of it in Georgia. We have in the com- 
pass of this broad continent every kind of soil, tempera- 
ture and atmospheric condition that can be found else- 
where. We have capital in sufficient abundance to prose- 
cute any promising enterprise. The people who grow, 
cure and ship tea in China will soon be in the ranks of the 
Boxers, fighting those very foreign devils to whom they 
have sold their product for these many years. Tea is one 
of the few things a Chinaman must have. With it, and a 
little rice he can get aloug. He will, with a reduced pro- 
duct, keep his tea, and foreigners would probably do with- 
out rather than buy in time of war. Trade with China 
would seem to be at an end for many a long day to come. 
Even if it should be soon resumed, we will be all the better 
off for being able to supply our own wants. There is good 
money in the business. The raising of tea plants is there- 
fore recommended to the kind of people who created the 
vineyards of California, the cotton plantations of the South, 
and the grain fields of the Northern prairies, and who are 
already planting coffee, sugar and tobacco in the tropical 
islands we claim to own. 



McKINLEY'S ADDITIONS TO THE PLATFORM. 

WHEN the Republican platform emerged from the 
hands of the Philadelphia managers, it contained 
not one committal word as to the future of the Philip- 
pines. "Trust the President" was the burden of its song. 
Up to that date nobody seemed to be willing to be 
responsible for the new and terribly serious departure. 
The President had handed it over to Congress, but that 
body refused to have anything to do with it. It remained 
for the party's national convention to put it before the 
people as a question of policy to be voted upon. But even 
that embodiment of party opinion declined to touch it, 
except with a pair of tongs. It was handed over to the 
future and to the President. It is not in that way that 
the great policies of the nation have usually been shaped. 
The Rev. Dr. Cuyler, a strong anti-imperialist, in ad- 
dressing a New York ratification meeting, persuaded 
himself that he could vote for McKinley on the ground "that 
the platform nowhere expressly calls for permaoent pos- 
session of the Philippines," and he proceeded to express 
the hope, "with much solicitude, that Mr. McKinley, in 
his letter of acceptance, will redeem his mistakes and re- 
buke the brutalities and greed of a policy that would make 
the American name a stench and a hissing before the civi- 
lized world." Since then Mr. McKinley has delivered 
himself of his letter of acceptance, in which he says: "The 
Philippines are ours, and there will be no abatement of 
our rights; no abandonment of our duty; no policy of 
scuttle." The obstructionists, he says, "may postpone, 
but they cannot defeat the purpose of the nation to re- 
store order in the islands, and to establish a just and per- 
manent government." Is there any glinting at inde- 
pendence in all that? However, we now have the Presi- 
dent's word for it that his election means that we are in 
the Philippines to stay forever. Dr. Cuyler, Senator 
Hoar, and others who think like them, are now engulfed 
in embarrassments of their own making, but they will 
vote for McKinley all the same. 

START AMBULANCE CLASSES. 

THE Southern Pacific has made a good move in giving 
the employees on the Oakland ferry boats a course of 
medical and surgical instruction. Accidents are numer- 
ous, suicides occur almost every day, and many a valuable 
life might have been saved in the past had the deck hands 
possessed even a smattering of ambulance drill. The mere 
fact that the Southern Pacific started the scheme is 
enough to secure ridicule from the Examiner, though 
thinking people will see in the idea the nucleus of a move- 
ment which should be widely beneficial. Every railway 
man, every car conductor, every gripman, every police- 
man, in short, every man whose occupation is likely to 
bring him into contact with serious cases of accident, 
should be compelled to go through an ambulance course, 
which would teach him the best methods of rendering first 
aid to the injured, and would enable him to give such as- 
sistance as might be necessary until the patient could be 
removed to a hospital, or the services of a doctor could be 
secured. Many a sufferer has been allowed to bleed to 
death because no one around knew how to apply a tourni- 
quet in a proper way. In cases of broken limbs simple 
fractures are often converted into compound fractures 
through sheer carelessness and ignorance in handling the 
patient. So with burns, scalds, and a host of other acci- 
dents, there is always an immediate and simple remedy at 
hand, and the ambulance lecture teaches how to apply it. 
People are often allowed to die a lingering death from 
poison just because no one knew of a simple antidote which 
might have been applied. There is a right and a wrong 
way to bandage a wound, there is a right and a wrong 
way to lift and carry an injured man, there are several 
different ways of improvising stretchers from any mater- 
ial which may be at hand; there are a hundred little medi- 
cal and surgical hints to be picked up by the willing stu- 
dent. The Knights of St. John, the leading Red Cross 
Society of the world, has for years been teaching these 
things, and hundreds of thousands already possess 
their certificates of competency in ambulance work. The 
course is not a hard one to go through, any intelligent 
man can pass it with ease, and there is no reason why 
this humane work should not be extended to every part of 
the State. 



August 4, 1900 



BAH JBAJ 1 m;\\s i.I 111 1, 



3 



A POLICY OF ACTION IN CHINA. 

ARE the great powers of the earth cowards. If not, 
what are they? More than seven weeks ago they 
were confronted with a condition of things that has no 
parallel io history. It is needless to go over the 
again. It has been repeated from day to day and we all 
know its sickening details only too well. Now there is an 
apparent disposition to minimize the atrocities of the 
Chinese Government, on the ground that not all the 
foreign ambassadors have been killed, and on the further 
alleged ground, which nobody believes, that the govern- 
ment is now protecting those that are alive. Those who 
have escaped torture and death have only their own 
courage, and strong right arms to thank for their safety. 
The German Ambassador was set upon within the verv 
precincts of the Chinese Foreign Office and despatched in 
short order. One hundred and twenty of the foreign 
attaches have been wounded and sixty-two killed. A hot 
fire was kept up for weeks, most of the legations were 
destroyed, and all, including women and children, had to 
take refuge in the more defensible building occupied by the 
British Minister and his family. In all this time they were 
prevented communicating with their respective govern- 
ments. It was at first given out, through Chinese sources, 
that lawless bands of Boxers were responsible for all this 
and not the Government. We now know better. The 
government's own edicts prove the case against them up 
to the hilt. How the remnant of the foreign ambassadors, 
attaches, guards, missionaries and tbeir families, have 
held out so long under constant fire is a mystery. That 
tbey fought back again we know, and it is reported that 
they caused more than a thousand Chinese to bite the 
dust. When the story comes to be authoritatively told it 
will necessarily be a sickening one. Meanwhile, relief — 
relief— relief is the thing needed! The threat has been 
held out that the remaining ambassadors will be killed if 
Peking is approached. Bah! Let it be approached all 
the more quickly. See to it that due notice be given to 
the Chinese Government that Peking will be laid in ashes, 
that they and their officials will be pursued to the death, 
that the coast towns will be bombarded, and tbeir rice 
fields set on fire, unless the ambassadors be at once 
delivered to their friends. This ultimatum, backed by a 
sufficient show of force, would quickly bring the present 
dynasty to arms. A policy of action is badly wanted. 
The Ministers themselves have begged for a relief force 
and are the best judges of the safety in sending it. 



THE STAMPEDE FROM NOME. 

THE Nome rush has ended as a craze of the kind usually 
does. Death, disease, and starvation have worked 
havoc among the army of fools always ready to sacrifice 
themselves in any trap properly baited with the glitter of 
gold, for which, it has been made clearly evident ever 
since the Klondike was sprung upon the world, that there 
are no end of people ready at any moment to sacrifice 
their souls, if such they possess. A small, infinitely small, 
percentage have satisfied their sordid craving in this re- 
spect; the rest will manage to crawl back to civilization 
sadder, and it is to be hoped wiser for their bitter ex- 
perience. Many of the unfortunates at Nome will have 
again to throw themselves upon the charity of their Gov- 
ernment for relief from the miserable plight in which they 
now find themselves and for which they alone are to blame. 
It is well for them that they have a humane nation to 
deal with; otherwise it would go hard with many, and 
death would probably be their fate. The yellow press 
is now trying to throw the burden of responsibility for the 
disaster upon the transportation companies, which are 
comparatively blameless. The latter made money by mov- 
ing the army of imbeciles up north, whose crazy brains 
were turned by the tales of fabulous wealth to be found 
scattered along the beach of Nome and under the tundra 
covered swamDS of the interior. Now that these stories 
have been proven absolutely false and misleading, the 
stool-pigeons of the mercenary fakers with claims for sale 
and other axes to grind, hope to divert public censure by 
a wild outcry against the steamship companies, against 
whom no other charge can truthfully be laid than that 
they provided the necessary accommodation for travel. 
The percentage of fools remaining behind, content to let 



the cmgeniul idiots who beling to the same fraternity 
e ther make a spoon or spoil a horn by risking their all up 
North, mi ipplaud lh\ Una. nf reasoning. It 

just suits the mind of a pervert, and the diss is Uglon, 
judging from the hoisted circulation of the journals which 
cater to such unspeakable tastes. Very likely bv this 
time next year another exodus of the fraternity will take 
place, under similar conditions, in a frantic rush to be 
first In at some new Arctic El Dorado, the fame of which 
will have been bruited far and wide in the columns of freak 
Sunday editions, successful in the universal scramble for 
male and female Munchausens who furnish the material 
f>r "scoops." When the objective point of the rush is 
reached, and the truth of the situation dawns upon the 
up-to-date argonauts, the first in will also be the first to 
get out, if it lies in their power. 

SONG OF THE ANTI-KIPLINGITE. 

THERE is something rampant within the breast of 
Ambrose Bierce, and for result we have a portrait 
which Kipling's own mother would not recognize. Kipling 
a genius forsooth? He is played out and Bret Harte is 
played In again. He is played out and Dr. Doyle takes his 
innings. He is played out for "a behemoth, placing his 
effacing foot on the pleasant paths of English fiction." 
To sum up, the behemoth is the passing "clay-footed idol 
of the Hooligans." Dear, dear, it makes one sympathize 
with Monsieur Jourdain of Molierian memory. To think 
that we should all be Hooligans, worshipping behemoths 
without knowing it! And all this because poor Kipling 
has had ill luck to write, and publish in Maclure's, and be 
paid for, a South African story which Mr. Bierce does not 
like. The pity o't! But the pity is, not that one man of 
genius should be abused but that another man of genius 
should make a spectacle of himself. Nobody denies Bierce's 
gifts. Nobody denies that his story-telling powers ought 
to have placed him in the front rank of fiction and given 
him the financial results which have accrued to some less 
deserving writers. Nobody denies either that Bret Harte 
stood once in the very first rank of short story writers, 
and that to this day none have surpassed his earlier pro- 
ductions. Nor does anyone deny the delightful charm of 
Dr. Doyle's stories. But is that a reason for using these 
writers as battering-rams against Kipling's reputation, 
and does Mr. Bierce think that by so using them will harm 
auyone but himself? When Bierce describes Kipling as a 
literary hippopotamus he implies lamentable ignorance of 
Rudyard's many-sidedness. For those to whom neither 
sailor nor soldier, engineer or schoolboy types appeal, 
those to whom the virility of life seems coarse and rough, 
there is Kipling's feminine side which no woman writer 
has surpassed. Let Ambrose Bierce re-read "Without 
Benefit of Clergy," or that exquisite echo from a mother's 
heart "The Song of the Women," and then repeat his 
phrase "between the lightness of his (Bret Harte's) touch 
and the broad spatular blotching of Mr. Kipling there is 
all the difference between the humming-bird and the 
hippopotamus." 

It is becoming a fad to abuse Kipling and give Richard 
Harding Davis a rest. But there is no good reason as 
yet for giving Davis a rest. 



THERE are two kinds of advertising: the decent and 
the obscene. The man who paints the name of his 
pills or hair restorer on the byways and highways com- 
mits a nuisance and should be repressed. There are 
legitimate, dignified ways of advertising what one has to 
sell. But there is no excuse for the high fence with its 
blatant lettering that soils the city and reduces the value 
of property. There is no excuse for the absurd advertis- 
ing curtain used in so many theatres. No matter how 
good the play may be, how splendid the opera, the illusion 
is smashed the instant this ulcerous canvas unfolds to the 
view. Give us clean theatres and clean streets. Let the 
law take its course and squelch these quack advertising 
agents, who retard trade, prosperity and civilization. 
The climate, the situation, and the later architecture of 
San Francisco conspire to make it a beautiful city; it is 
only the advertising vandal who would for the price 
paint pills on a tombstone, that holds us back. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900. 



"BEVARE OF THE VIDDERS, SAMIVEL." 

YOUNG Cornwallis-West is a fine, stalwart fellow of 25 
years of age, who has already had experience enough 
of the world to come home invalided from South Africa, 
but evidently has not learned sufficient to profit by the 
lessons of the immortal Sam Weller senior. Of course 
everybody knows, except Cornwallis-West, that Weller 
senior solemnly cautioned Weller junior, in starting out 
in life, in these ever applicable and never to be forgotten 
words: " Bevare of the vidders, Samivel." West, with 
all the buds of civilization to choose from, has fallen into 
the arms of a kittenish "vidder," old enough to be his 
mother, and is now "all her own." The wiles of Lady 
Randolph Churchill were simply too much for him. He 
probably never had been made love to with such ardor in 
all his life. The lady bad long since cast aside her widow's 
weeds in disgust and disported herself in society as chipper 
as the boldest debutante of them all. She had married a 
weakling, though a genius. He could make speeches that 
electrified the House of Commons, and that lifted him to 
the position of its leader, but when it came to making love 
to a young and beautiful wife he was simply not in it. 
Soon his brain softened, his nervous system collapsed, and 
he became a wreck. His wife nursed him with tender 
care, travelled with him from place to place, and devoted 
herself to him with that loyalty which only a good woman 
knows. Three years ago his bones were placed in the 
Mausoleum alongside of those of his ancestor, John, the 
Great Duke of Marlborough. Lady Randolph, after a 
fitting time for mourning, entered society again, took 
under her wing the American colony in London, became 
leader of the Primrose League, went as chief nurse on 
board the hospital ship Maine, furnished her son, a 
prisoner at Pretoria, with the means that enabled him to 
escape, found young Cornwallis West down with enteric 
fever, nursed him and fell in love with him, and was proud 
to own it. Clearly she is the kind of widow that General 
Ben F. Butler immortalized in the House of Representa- 
tives. A busy life has done her good; she looks as young 
and as piquant as she did 20 years ago. The Queen, the 
Princess of Wales, and many others have tried to dissuade 
her, but all to no purpose. Among those who essayed the 
taslc was the voung, beautiful but widowed mother of 
Cornwallis. "Why," responded Lady Randolph, "you 
ought to be the last to complain. I am setting you an 
example by which you can marry my son Winston, when 
he comes home with the honors of war blushing thick 
around him." Lady Randolph's income is $25,000 a year, 
and that of Cornwallis-West $7,500 a year; not enough to 
scatter around lavishly, but sufficient to live on comfort- 
ably. They were married last Saturday. Lady Ran- 
dolph, by the way, is an American girl. 



PLAYED OUT TO THE END. 

THE Boer war may be said to be practically over. The 
guerrilla stage has almost played itself out, and with 
its termination all is at an end, except the serious duty of 
pacifying the country. Botha and Dewit are surrounded 
by British troops and their escape is reported to be im- 
possible. As for Ooti Paul he is, in the language of the 
period, "a dead cock in the pit." He cleared out of 
Pretoria without awaiting the arrival of the British, 
abandoned Johannesburg without exploding so much as a 
fire cracker, left bis good old frau to be cared for by the 
kindness of the troops her husband tried to slaughter, and 
took with him all the gold he could lay his hands upon. 
He is where he could be captured in a day, but the 
British do not want him, and for the reason that his in- 
fluence with his countrymen is gone. He had the oppor- 
tunity of making for himself a grand figure in history, but 
he threw it away, because when the critical time came 
and he found himself in personal danger, he proved him- 
self a craven. Joubert and Cronje happily could not wit- 
ness the humiliating sight. It will not have escaped atten- 
tion, that since the withdrawal of those two great men, 
the fighting on the side of the Boers has lost its early life 
and spirit. There was no military reason why Lord 
Roberts should have been permitted to march to Pretoria 
as if on a picnic. The reason for it existed in Pretoria. 
Its history will make interesting reading some day. 



THE PRIMARY ELECTION LAW STRANGLED. 

THE Supreme Court, in its unwisdom, has knocked out 
the so-called Stratton primary election law. We have 
no recollection of the time when it did not do the same 
thing with any law intended and calculated to purify and 
uplift local politics. We do not pretend to know just why 
this should be so, but the unfortunate fact is that our 
Judges have to look to the Bosses for their nominations, 
and Boss power is only maintained by open primaries 
which no decent man cares to attend. What the Stratton 
law did we all know, because the last primary was con- 
ducted under it, and gave extreme satisfaction to the 
best elements of the city, but, as was to be expected, it 
created dislike in the minds of the ward heelers, strikers, 
and all and sundry the horde that render Bossism possible 
and constitute the game of politics the filthy pool that it 
is. The Stratton law, being hated' by such elements, 
ought to have been loved for the enemies it made. Decent 
citizens have desired during long years past to kill Boss- 
ism, and have tried many experiments to that end, which 
invariably terminated in failure, and all because the rough 
and rowdy elements, at the behest of other men who were 
"out for the stuff," carried the primaries. It was an ac- 
cursed system that won the condemnation of every man 
with a conscience and a mind. The Stratton law gave it 
a death blow. Yet it was but a simple measure which 
showed how easy it is to kill when you really mean shoot. 
It was merely the application of the Australian secret 
ballot to party primary elections. Upon trial, it was 
found to be unassailable to Boss attack. It was useless to 
buy votes when there was no way of telling how they were 
cast. All this was perfectly known to our Boss nominated 
Judges, who by as flimsy an excuse as ever entered a 
human brain, proceeded to set aside the statute as un- 
constitutional, the objection to it beiDg that it discrimi- 
nated, in that it required not less than three per cent, of 
the total vote cast at the preceding election to constitute 
a party entitled to have the names of its nominees placed 
on the ballot paper. It was held that the beggarly min- 
ority of one possessed all the rights of the whole, and 
that if every voter were not permitted to put such names 
on the ticket as suited him, the act must fail as being un- 
constitutional by reason of discrimination. In that case 
our general election law is obviously void. Yet the 
Supreme Court has declared it valid! Under the latest 
decision the Australian ballot system is impossible in this 
State. Yet it is in operation in more than half the States 
in the Union, and everywhere it is deemed a righteous 
revolution in politics. 



THE BAR ASSOCIATION. 

SEVERAL of the dailies are loudly demanding to know 
why the Bar Association does not doits duty towards 
certain rascally lawyers who have been exposed in the 
Probate Court and scorned by public opinion. But the 
Bar Association makes no sign. There must be a reason 
for this. What is it? The truth about the association is 
that on its roll of membership are the names of many at- 
torneys of eminent respectability, who pay their dues 
when called upon, and personally adorn the honored pro- 
fession to which they belong, and that is about all. They 
attend no meetings, have no idea of disciplining anybody, 
and are content with being "correct" themselves. The 
trouble is that they leave the active work of the associa- 
tion pretty much to men who, for the most part have par- 
taken of a portion of the pork themselves. That is why 
they push themselves to the front. Those of them who 
have sinned, as Chretien confesses he has, naturally de- 
sire to protect their kind. That is why the dailies are 
shouting for righteousness in vain. The Judges have com- 
plete power to take the initiative in such matters, but 
then, the rascals have votes, and political pulls, and things. 



NOT being pleased with a caller, Mrs. Mary Mahoney 
shot him twice, and then beat him over the bead with 
a stick of stove wood. A question has arisen in social 
circles as to whether this is not too harsh an application 
of the laws of inhospitality. Still, a man of ordinary deli- 
cacy, having been bulleted even once, would rush to the 
conclusion that his presence was not desired. 






August 4, 1900. 
G/>e NEWSPAPERMAN 

&/>e NICKEL-IN-TH 



BAN FBANOISOO KEWS LETTEH. 
AND 



B» REGINALD SCHUYLER. 

WHENEVER I see my editor, or aoy oltaer editor, 
roasting the nickei-io-tbe-slot machines I lauifh. 
Laughter is a habit of mine, and as long as I n 
include myself among the causes for it, 1 caunot ma 
out to be a selfish and vain habit. 1 am nut what you 
would call off-hand a newspaper man. I write because it 
pleases me to talk in print to the many people whom I do 
not know. I associate now and then witb newspapermen 
because as a general thing they are bright, whole-hearted 
fellows, who forgive my little eccentricities as easily as I 
forgive theirs. But they are a thinskinned lot— believe 
me they are. The worst in the world to stand a joke on 
themselves. And they will play the machines. 
I kThe impulse to gamole is strong in any man of blood and 
nerve. Life, business, and slot-machines are gambles; 
and the cheapest of these is the slot machine. We like 
cheap things, and we play the machines. A vulgar habit, 
I admit, and absurdly popular, but we all do it. You, my 
dear friend the banker; you, the opulent insurance agent; 
you, the careful stock operator; you, the Sansome-street 
wholesaler — all of you come to the "can" wheD you are in 
your favorite cigar shop or refreshment emporium and the 
world is not looking. Most of you care not a nickel whether 
the world looks or not. I talk to my cigar man now and 
then — he is quite a decent tradesman — and invariably he 
assures me that he harbors slot machines only because 
they are good "sellers": that is to say they induce the 
patron who is willing to spend twenty-five cents to spend 
anything from seventy-five ceuts to two dollars. When 
we win we are glad and full of boast. I have seen chaps 
open magnums of champagne on the svrength of a royal 
flush in the cigar machine. When we lose we take it as a 
matter of course, except for a little profanity behind our 
teeth. We know that we are being robbed, that the odds 
are dead against us; but there is only a nickel for a single 
stake, and we forget how the many nickels count. 

As I intimated before, the newspaper man who writes 
bitter editorials against the machine habit, is one of its 
softest victims. He plays and plays and plays, and the 
more he loses the stronger is his conviction that the game 
is a fake; and when he wins he considers it "getting 
money from home." 

I have seen Hugh Hume, the editor of the Post, put a 
hundred nickels in a single machine and half as many 
more the next day. And then I have seen a copy of his 
paper in which the whole scheme is branded bunco. But 
he comes back to the "can." So do the other editors. So 
do I; and I have studied Monte Carlo where the odds are 
fairly fair and the winnings are something more than 
mere merchandise. None of us has sympathy for the man 
who loses, not even when that man is ourself. We love to 
be fooled; we love to see others fooled; we love to gamble 
ou the nickel installment plan. 

There are some machines that pay money to the nickel- 
dropper instead of merchandise. They were introduced 
here at the Midwinter Fair, and I remember witnessing 
gentlewomen at play for hours at a time. One of these 
machines is a feature of a well-known cafe not far from 
the Columbia theatre. I saw Edward Morgan the actor 
lose almost a hundred dollars in it in one night. 

" Why do you play this sort of a game," said I. 

"I can't sleep," said he, "and poker is too exciting, so 
I drop nickels." 

There are just two thousand nickels in $100. 

Even the children have their little machines in the 
grocery stores where they drop a penny and get a frag- 
ment of gum or chocolate. The telephone has a slot for 
your nickel, and when you are lucky you get your 
switch. We have had the stone age, the golden age and 
the iron age, but we are now living in the nickel age. 
But I wish the editors would either quit playing or 
roasting. 

July and August are favorite vacation months. Along the line of 
the Catiforuia Northwestern Eailway you wilt find ever so many 
vely spots to rest and enjoy idleness and pleasure. 




Modern — ^ 

NOB HILL FLAT 

1011 CALIFORNIA ST.. Near Mason, 
Opposite flood Mansion. 

tttfa rOOIDI Inrjte laundry, roal 
bankers, inlaid Moor" in »ira*mg room, on- 
!«urpa**rd view north and lOUtb. Kour inin- 

qim' rid* from Kearny itreet, in minutes 
from Mark el itiret Run 9100 Will lease 
to nwponsJua part i<-^. Apply 10 

Q. A. BERTON, 323 Montgomery St. 



Mrs. J. R. Cornell 



Local Agent and Bureau of Information for 



YOSEMITE 
MAR IPOS AH 



Taber 



VALLEY and 
BIG TREES 

121 Post street 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in. 



-De. Sura nv, 271 Lexington avenue. New York 



L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 



Send for Pamphlet, 



418 Sacramento Street. 



Blake. Moffit & Towne 



Blake. Mofflt & Towne. Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co.. Portland Or. 



Telephone Main 199 

Dealers in PAPER 

55-57-59-61 First street, 9. P. 



WIHI. WILLIAMS & SONS 



(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch_Whisky 

Importers - MACONDRAY & CO. 



Dr. Clyde Payne 

Has Returned from 

And resumed the Practice 

135 Geary street. 

Phone Main 9 



New York 

of Dentistry at 
Spring Valley Building 



I. Dbutoh, Proprietor. 

Crystal Palace 

6 Kearny street, 
Choice "Wines and Liquors. 



Telephone Main 5544 



12 Geary street, S. F., Cal. 



J. B. PoN. I Pikkkb Cakiiere, Founder of Maison Tortoni. | O. La L ANNE 

Old Poodle Dog Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Franctsoo 
Lunch, BO cts. Dinner, 76 cts. Also, a la carte. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 



THE AWARD AT 

CHICAGO. 1893 
Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1899. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States, 
Mb. Hbnby Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, iqoo. 




Tlecuure'j 
Wand 

|J OJe dev no wand butPfoasun 's 

— Tom Jiaart, . ^ « r£ 




THE Tivoli has done more to make real music popular 
in San Francisco than all the teachers and the other 
theatres combined. Every season now it gives us the 
masterpieces of grand operas well mounted and sung by 
singers who have good voices and the real instinct even if 
their names are not familiar ones on the programmes of 
the Metropolitan Opera House. One of these singers, 
Salassa, would not discredit any opera company; he has 
the voice, the temperament and considerable art; and in 
the production of Aida, which opened the season last 
Monday night, he presented an Amonasrothat was all but 
perfect from the vocal standpoint. It lacked something 
in dramatic feeling; indeed from a histrionic point it was 
wanting; but Salassa was big and splendid to hear. 
Avedano was again the Radames, and a much better one 
than he used to be. But he would still rather be a tenor 
than an actor, and he is fearlessly fond of his top notes. 
His performance is conventional, but rich with good 
sound. Frances Tempest Graham is also better to hear 
than to see. She has a contralto of depth and natural 
beauty and she uses it with easy effect; but her acting 
does not picture the part of Amneris with convincing 
vividness. One is not expected to praise Anna Lichter 
for her acting. She has a valuable voice that will serve 
in anything from comic opera to grand, and her acquittal 
of the part of Aida, while scenicly absurd was voiced with 
easy confidence and sweet tone. A new comer who made 
a favorable impression in a not over exacting part was 
Alessandra Nicolini as the High Priest. He wields a 
basso of moderate weight and fair texture and he is not 
overposed. Our good friend. Mr. Shuster, was the 
Egyptian King and for Shuster a surprisingly good one. 
I can unblushingly compliment Mr. fiirschfeld for the 
good work of the orchestra. There is nothing sensational 
about his conducting, but in serious music he has the 
qualities of certainty and confidence that inspire his bands- 
men to good effort. 

* * * 

Lucia has alternated with Aida, and Repetto does some 
amazing coloratura singing in the name part of the former. 
She has a high Quid voice for the music and her execution 
of the "mad scene" is admirable. I do not blame the 
enthusiastic press agents forcallingherthe Italian Melba. 

* * * 

It is still melodrama at Morosco's Grand Opera House — 
The Red Lamp— a play that is neither bad enough to score 
a success as an out and out melodrama nor good enough 
to win as a serious dramatic proposition. I am at a loss 
to understand what Beerbohm Tree ever found in the part 
of the Russian Chief of Police to make famous, and I am 
also at a loss as to why Wilton Lackaye should waste his 
splendid character skill on the same part. While it may 
be true that Mr. Tree inflated his own reputation by copy- 
ing Mr. Lackaye's work in Svengali, I do not see that Mr. 
Lackaye has any chance of getting even in this part. The 
Red Lamp takes itself seriously and asks you to do the 
same, and that in my opinion is where it fails. The con- 
fidential detective who tells his troubles to the audience in 
fierce whispers is the central character of this drama, and 
in spite of an unconventional make-up and a big actor he 
fails to fool you. 

* * # 

Of course there are nihilists and dynamiters in The Rid 
Lamp. Nihilists and dynamiters spell Russia in the minds 
of the average un-Russian theatre-goer. According to 
the playwriters they have nothing over there except 
bombs and tyranny. The special nihilist in this instance 
is a young prince, Alexis. His sister, the Princess 
Claudia, is a staunch royalist, who in some way or an- 
other has discovered and betrayed many schemes directed 
against the life of the Czar. She admits frankly that it 
pleases her to see the objector to imperialism marching 
Siberiaward. But when she discovers that her brother is 



one of the foes to the crown, and that his life and the 
lives of his friends depend upon a warning from her, she 
places the red lamp in the window. The band does not 
play "There's a Light in the Window," but it ought to. 
But the vigilant Chief of Police makes a specialty of re- 
moving this lamp, and the band plays "The Light That 
Failed," or if it does not it ought to. 

I appreciate Mr. Morosco's good sense in coming back 
to melodrama, which h3S been sadly wanted in the South- 
side; and I appreciate the good work that Mr. Frawley 
has done in putting up big, expensive productions; and I 
appreciate the value of melodrama as a theatrical enter- 
tainment — but The Red Lamp is neither fish nor fowl, nor 
good red herring. It is too bad to be good enough, and 
too good to be bad enough. However, it serves to show 
Keith Wakeman in the best acting she has done in San 
Francisco. Miss Wakeman has a voice that is unhappily 
reminiscent of Nance O'Niell's, and her gestures are 
stuffed, but in this part of the Princess, which she plays 
in a straight-a-way key of obvious melodrama, she finds 
herself at her best. Mr. Lackaye works hard with the 
part of Demetrius, the detective. He is full of pains and 
frugal of noisy effect. But he over-estimates the part, 
and the part will not stand for over-estimation. There is 
a wild caricature of an American journalist played with 
Australasian zeal by Mr. Roberts; a scheming villain im- 
possibly figured by Frank Matthews (who. by the way, is 
too good a fellow to persist in being a bad actor); and a 
baby-faced Prince in a sing-song by Clarence Chase. The 
stage management is too slow, but the scenery is a credit 
to the town. 

* * * 

Henry Miller's revival of Brother Officers has entertained 
good houses at the Columbia this week. It was a fortu- 
nate coincidence that the comic opera season at the Tivoli 
ended in time to permit Edwin Stevens to resume his 
original part of Robert Hutton. A study of Mr. Stevens's 
work in this role would not be without its reward for any 
conscientious villain impersonator. The quality of humor 
that is so often lacking in "heavy" parts is brought out 
with delightful effect. It is character rather than carica- 
ture. Mr. Miller repeats bis former success as the par- 
venu lieutenant. It is strong, thoughtful work, and dis- 
plays less deliberateness and more feeling than are usual 
in Mr. Miller's acting. 

* * * 

At the Alcazar, Florence Roberts shows a pretty phase 
of her versatility as Juliet in Shakespeare's love tragedy. 
She reads her lines with a deal of genuine feeling, and in 
the balcony scene especially her portraiture is poetic and 
thrilling. Miss Roberts is a good actress in spite of her 
mannerisms. She works with her head as well as with 
her voice, and while her Juliet will not "roll down the cor- 
ridors of time," it is a valuable assumption of the princi- 
pal part in one of the best plays ever written. The idea 
that it takes a great actor or actress to play great plays 
is all bosh: a good play helps itself, and William Shakes- 
peare made a specialty of writing good ones. Mr. Whit- 
tlesey contributes a large, impassioned Romeo, well voiced, 
and showing excellent appreciation of the text. And sev- 
eral of the lesser parts are played admirably. 

* * * 

Next to Rush City, the revival of By the Sad Sea Waves 

is the best thing Dunne & Ryley's comedians have given 

us this season at the California. Matthews & Bulger in 

their old parts are persistently funny. Tbey sing "Money 

in the Bank" to win bunches of encores; and Mary Marble 

does a coon lullaby that storms the house, and then there 

is a sextette lead by Bessie Tannehill that indulges in 

serious vocalization without spoiling the farce comedy or 

the music. 

* * # 

The Alcazar management misjudged the public's will 
when it withdrew TJie Country Girl at the expiration of 
one week's run. The play did a phenomenal business, and 
so great has been the demand for seats and so urgent the 
request to continue it that the management has decided 
to withhold Frou Frou and revive Tlie Country Girl on Mon- 
day for one week only. 

Frou Frou follows The Country Girl and will in turn be 
followed by Charlotte Thompson's new play, A Suit of Sable. 



August 4, 1900. 



BAN THAI NEWS LETTER. 



The Miller .-.eason is rapidly drawiou to a clo«e The 
fiftieth performance will be Riven on Tuesday 1 g I 
the seventh week of his entrapment at the Columbia Mr. 
Miller is to prodooe the popular romantic 

n which he won so much favor when the plav was 
formerly presented at both the Baldwin and Column'.. 
Eric Temple, the young composer, Mr. Miller is seen at 
his very best. The play is one of the best drawing cards 
of Miller's entire repertory and as it is to be given the 
strongest cast that has yet appeared in it there will be 
an additional interest in its staging. Utnrtttatr is to be 
presented for one week only and on Monday night August 
13th, another costume play, The Adventure 0/ /..;,/, 
I'rtula, will be staged. 

The New Frawley Company at the Grand Opera House 
will present for the week beginning Monday night the 
four-act play by Henry Arthur Jones, entitled The Mi./, lie- 
mnn. This is the piece in which E. S. Willard starred so 
successfully, both in this country and \a England. The 
Frawley production will be the first ever given except 
under the immediate direction of Mr. Willard. The third 
act of The Middleman affords an opportunity for a striking 
bit of stage realism in the representation of the interior 
of the firing house of a pottery in full operation. Miss 
Corona Riccardo will re-appear as May Blenkarn. 

At the California Theatre the Dunne & Ryley Company 
will present for the tenth and last week, beginning Sun- 
day night, a new piece written especially for Matthews 
and Bulger, and the one in which these funny men will 
star during the coming season, entitled The Night of the 
Fourth. Mr. Bulger will play the part of a retired ice- 
man, who has nothing to do but go to the country, where 
he desires absolute repose. Keenan Swift, a lawyer, who 
forces damage suits against every one, will be played by 
J. Sherrie Matthews, and Walter Jones will make his re- 
appearance as Arthur Strong, looking for work, a part 
written especially for him. 

The Burton Holmes lectures as given by Mr. Louis 
Francis Brown at the Columbia Theatre bid fair to become 
as popular here as at Daly's Theatre, New York. On 
Sunday evening, August 5th, the subject will be "Round 
About Paris," with an added attraction in the form of a 
number of motion pictures taken by Mr. Brown in the 
Klondike last summer, and some Japanese pictures, which 
he was unable to show last week. On Thursday afternoon 
and next Sunday evening, August 12tb, the subject will 
be 'The Grand Canyon of Arizona." 

Laura Bennett and Sallie Stembler, who head the new 
bill at the Orpheum this week, will give San Francisco an- 
other taste of George Cohan's humor. They will present 
Sapho and Lulu, a piece recently from the pen of the young 
actor-author. The Meeker-Baker Trio will introduce 
something new in the knock-about line. Jolly John Nash 
is well known as a monologist. Hooker and Davies have a 
lively act in which they introduce singing and dancing 
specialties. Mr. and Mrs. John Mason will remain another 
week and will present a new sketch. 

At the Tivoli to-night Aida wiil be sung and to-morrow 
night Lucia will be heard for the last time. For next 
week the bill will be Othello and Rigoletto. Othello on Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday nights, while Rigo- 
letto is the bill for Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday evenings 
and Saturday matinee. In the cast for Othello are Lichter, 
Salassa and Avedano and Frances Graham. The pro- 
nounced success of Othello last season is well remembered. 
In the cast of Rigoletto are Repe tto, Russo and Ferrari. 

At Fischer's Concert House the programme for the 
coming week will include Bertha Adams, soprano; Eudora 
Forde, mezzo-soprano; La Lista, an "electrical dancer;" 
Herbert Mediey, baritone, and Ray and Owen Ogden, as- 
sisted by Bertha Foltz, in a sketch entitled The Right 
Stocking. 

Comet de Orient. 
Cigarette de Luxe— finest Turkish tobacco. At M. Blaskower 4" 
Co., 223 Montgomery St. and 1 Kearny St. , cor. Geary, San Francisco. 

The human skin is sensitive; bad cosmetics scar it. Camelline 
not only beautifies but soothes. It is used by Adelina Patti, Ellen 
Terry and Mrs. Kendall and thousands of others. 



Fike stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co., 
746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Grand Opera House. 



aiiTornia I neatre. n«*rT»uoni i. r Thm, m«ii> mi 

FftriwHl vrfk. DuuM A Hyl< > "• vlt-.lar Mali i.rr««nlln« M.I 
lho»T» & rtiilser. in lliclr Lie. I lnKPcm^l, lu 

THE NIGHT OF THE FOURTH 

Rmppoumim of Walter Janm «»tni Kuda < nmine>\ nnnd»r 

nftorit-M.il i*i»<l the week IrTPfflmiMlng M<.nd»r. Augiml 1.1th. 

THE BROWNIES IN FAIRYLAND 
Spool al Humlay night pcrfornimice. tiraud farewell of iMinnc A 
Ryley > all-star cant. In RUSH GlTY. 

W \t.i 1 1: ftfOM 

Sole Lomoc and Manager 

Week beginning Mi.mlity. AuiMul 'Uli, 

The New FRAWLEY Company 

Presents 

THE MIDDLEMAN 

A play of the deepest hiimnn intercut by Henry Arthur June*. 
Prices: 25c . BOOw, 78a Onllories: 10c. and 15c. 

Columbia Theatre. OOTTLOB • l^"** anSaianaeer.. 

One week, beginning: next Monday: matinees Wednesday nnd 
Saturday. Charles Frohman presents Henry Miller And a spec- 
ial company In the popular romantic success. 

HEARTSEASE 

Henry Miller as Eric Temple. Magnificent costumes and stage 
settings. 

Every Thursday afternoon and Sunday night: The Bceton 
Holmes Lectures. 
August 13th: "The Adventures of the Lady Ursula." 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 



Mrs. Ernestine Krelino. 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Performances begin at 8 p. m. sharp. To-night, AIDrt. Sunday 
night. LUGIA. 

Second week, commencing Monday, August 6th: Monday, Wed- 
nesday, Friday, Saturday nights, OTHELLO. Lichter. Gra- 
ham, Avedano, Salassa, etc. Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday nights, 
Saturday matinee, RIGOLETTO, Repetto, Politini, Russo, 
Ferrari, andNicolini. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cent s. Telephone Bush 9. 

flL--.,- TL«-l-« Belabco & Thall, Managers. 

rucazar I neatre. phone, Main 254. 

Week of Monday, AuguBb 6th. Florence Roberts, supported 
by White Whittlesey, in a revival for one week only by special 
request of 

THE COUNTRY GIRL 

Alcazar Prices— 15c„ 25o„ 35c, 60c. Only Matinee Saturda y 

In preparation: Frotj Frou. 

0_ L _ , „, San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall . 
f PneU m . O'Farrell St,, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Laura Bennett and Sallie Stembler 

Meeker-Baker Trio Jolly John Nash 

Hooker & Davies Nichols Sisters 

St. Onze Brothers Zelma Rawlston 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mason (Katherine Grey). Blograph 
Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10c.; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Fischer's New Concert House o-FarSJfst. 

Beginning Monday, August 6th, E. A. Fischer, Proprietor. 

Bertha Adams, soprano, Eudora Forde, mezzo-soprano. Jean- 
nette Lewis, comedienne. La Lista, electrical dancer, Herbert 
Medley, baritone, and the Ogdens, assisted by Bertha Foltz, in 
"The Right Stocking." 
Admission, 10 cents; reserved seats, 25 cents: matinee Sunday. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless Hiring band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after the show is 
over. 

Lyceum Theatre School of Acting, 

310-312 O'FARRELL ST., one block from Alcazar and Orpheum. S. F. 

The largest and most complete School of Acting and Dramatic Agency west 
of New York. Suitable positions guaranteed to finished pupils. For terms 
call on or address F. W. STECHAN, Manager. Send for prospectus. 

ProfeBsorF. Bouley's Select Dancing Academy in conjunction with Ly- 
ceum School of Acting. Ballroom, Fancy and Stage Dancing taught in 
classes and private lessons. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the six months ending Juno 30, 1900, a dividend of 12 per cent, per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, 6 per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliver Eldridqe, President. William Corbin, Secretary. 
Office: 222 Sansome street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors, held on July 3, 1900, the 
regular quarterly dividend of 81.50 per share, being No. 66. was declared, 
payable on and after July 16, 1900. E. E, SHOTWELL, Seoretary. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 





Library&abk 

The Autobiography There is always a certain fascination 
Of A Quack. about the life history of a rogue, and 
Dr. S. Weir-Mitchell probably realized 
this fact when he wrote "The Adventures of Francois — 
Foundling, Thief and Fencing-Master." And now a new 
story "The Autobiography of a Quack" by the same au- 
thor, deals with a subject along similar lines. It is the life of 
a man who, born without moral sense, tries to justify him- 
self in the devices by which he seeks to get what he re- 
gards as his share of the money of his countrymen. "I 
have always observed," he remarks, "that there is no 
poverty so painful as your own, so that I prefer to dis- 
tribute pecuniary suffering among many, rather than to 
concentrate it on myself." 

The clever scamp who is supposed to have told this tale 
while lying ill in the Massachusetts General Hospital, 
merely wrote it — a plain straightforward account of the 
life he had led — to while away the monotonous hours. . 
With the conviction that no one would ever see the pages, 
as he meant to destroy the manuscript on his recovery, 
the narrative was a perfectly frank self-revelation of 
character. 

The main interest of the book is psychological, and the 
clever author of "Hugh Wynne" has treated his subject 
in a manner altogether in keeping with his scholarly tastes 
and professional perspicuity. The story is a remarkable 
study of a man utterly unable to discriminate between 
right and wrong. Ezra Sandcraft prates continually of 
his ill luck, and attributes to an unkind Providence alone 
the many misfortunes which his own short-comings bring 
about. As a boy he had stolen bank-notes from the hoard 
of an eccentric and deaf old aunt who hid part of her 
small income "like a magpie, in her Bible or rolled in her 
stockings, or in queerer places." At twenty-one he was 
graduated as a physician, but being "of large and liberal 
views" in bis profession the idea suggested itself to com- 
bine in one establishment all the various modes of practice 
which are known as irregular. Spiritualism, the patent 
medicine business, and different little ventures of a semi- 
professional character, such as exhibitions of laughiDg- 
gas, advertising to cure cancer, etc., were each tried in 
turn, but all "the energy and skill" he applied to obtaining 
the best returns with the smallest personal labor and risk 
availed him nothing. His career was inevitably downward. 
Just as the biography is finished the life of the quack goes 
suddenly out in the half-darkened ward of the public 
hospital, and the manuscript is left to tell the tale of that 
self-wrecked life. 

The illustrations by A. J. Keller are satisfactory, and 
bound up in the volume is a curious tale by Dr. Weir- 
Mitchell entitled, "The Strange Case of George Dedlow" 
a professedly autobiographical record of the experience of 
an army surgeon who loses his legs and arms by amputa- 
tion after the battle of Chickamauga. 

The Autobiography of a Quack: by S. Weir-Mitchell, M. r>. The Century 
Co., Publishers. New York. Price 81.25. 

The Sword Out of the historical data relating to the 
of Justice, struggle between the French and Spanish for 
the possession of Florida — a period in the 
early history of America which is full of romantic incident 
— Sheppard Stevens has woven a story which moves with 
continuous interest. Those who have read Parkman's 
"Pioneers of France in the New World," will remember 
his account of thedestnction of the Huguenots by Henen- 
dez at Fort Caroline, Florida, and how their deaths were 
avenged by Dominique de Gourgues. The author follows 
history very closely, giving an accurate view of Indian 
life in the sixteenth century, with many of their legends 
and their customs. To the lover of historical fiction the 
work may be safely recommended, for of its kind it is far 
above the average. 

The Sword of Justice: by sheppard Stevens. Little. Brown <fc Co.. Pub- 
lishers, Boston. Price, 81.25. 



August 4, iqoo. 

-r. ., , , , In Mr. Stoddard's latest Revolutionary 
The Noanks Log. story llThe Noank . g Log .. Guert Ten 

Eyck, a New York boy, the friend of Nathan Hale, and 
the hero of an earlier tale by the same author, reappears. 
The "Noank" is a privateer frequently in action, and 
whether the old whaler run the gauntlet of the British 
fleets, or carry the flag into British ports, Guert with his 
negro and Indian comrades may always be found in the 
thickest of the tight. Mr. Stoddard has overlooked the 
fact that during the early days of the Revolution the 
colonists made use of flags of various devices and that it was 
not until June 14, 1779 that the first legally established na- 
tional emblem was adopted by Congress. It then provided 
"that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen 
stripes, alternately red and white; that the Union be 
thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new 
constellation." The author speaks of the "Noank" flying 
the stars and stripes in December 1776. 

The illustrations by Will Crawford are very realistic, 
and where is the boy who will not relish the dramatic 
record of the long cruise of the "Noank?" 

The Noank's Log: by William O. Stoddard, Lothrop Publishing: Co., 
Boston. Price $1.25. 

The Princess Mr. E. F. Benson, who will be remembered 
Sophia. as the author of "Dodo," "The Capsina," 
"Mammon & Co.," etc., has just published 
a rather fantastic romance, the scene of which is laid in 
an imaginary principality somewhere between Turkey and 
Greece. "The Princess Sophia" — for that is the name of 
Mr. Benson's latest flight of fancy— is too absurd to be 
considered seriously, but it is amusing nevertheless. The 
hereditary Princess whose passion for gambling in general, 
and roulette in particular, leads ber at last to stake her 
kingdom — and lose it — is utterly unreal, still one follows 
her varying fortunes with an interest quite at variance 
with the merit of the book. 

The Princess Sophia: by E. K.Benson. Harper & Brothers. Publishers, 
New York. Price 81.25. 

_ . Helen M. Winslow, a well-known writer 

concern, ng Cats. and j ourna i ist of Boston, and editor of 
the "Club Woman," is a great lover of cats and for years 
has been collecting data regarding these domestic pets 
which she has now put into book form. "Concerning 
Cats," tells of the author's own pet cats, other people's 
cats, historic cats, cat clubs and cat shows. It tells also of 
cats in poetry, cat artists, cat hospitals and refuges, cat 
language and cat characteristics : The general treat- 
ment of cats is discussed at length, and in' a useful 
appendix the diseases of cats are considered and various 
remedies suggested. "For obvious reasons," the writer 
says, "homeopathic remedies are always safer for cats." 
There are many illustrations, and the book is dedicated to 
a cat — "Pretty Lady" — "who never betrayed a secret, 
broke a promise, proved an unfaithful friend; who had all 
the virtues and none of the failings of her sex." 

Concerning Cats: by Helen M. Winslow. Lothrop Publishing Company, 
Boston. Prico 81.50. 

The Man That Mark Twain is still the most dis- 

Corrupted Hadleyburgh. linguished exponent of what we 
are pleased to call "American 
humor." And this new book of his, which receives its 
title from the rather long short story that prefaces the 
other stories and the essays, will be welcomed by the 
collectors of bis works. The volume includes some fifteen 
stories and essays that have appeared recently in the 
magazines. The title story is one of rare invention, and 
there is a deal of wisdom in its fun, and a something of 
pathos, too. 

The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburgh: by Mark Twain. Harper & 
Brothers, Publishers. New York. Price 81.75. 

Books Received. 

The Macnjillan Co.: "A Friend of Caesar," by Wui. Stearns 
PavK price $1.50; '"European Travel for Women," by Mary 
Cadwalader Jones, price $1.00. 

Small. Maynard & Co.: "Up in Maine," by llolman F. Day, 
price $1.00; "Robert Browning," by Arthur Waugh (Westminster 
Biographies), price 75 cents. 

D. Appleton & Co. : ''Brown of Loit River," by Mary E. Siickey 
(Town and Country Library), price 50 cents. 

Lothrop Publishing Co.: "Ebon Holden,"by Trying Bacheller. 

T. 8. Uenison: "Jonathan's New Boy," by Pythias Damon 
(Denison's Series), price 25 cents. M. E. B. 



Aug-ust 4. 1900 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTFIl. 




[ 0\\ that they're dosing dance halls op. 

And theatres i.f doubtful hue. 
Anil giving dirty spots a coat 
01 whitewash new. 

And waging unrelenting strife 

Against the slot machine. 
And urging Chinamen to keep 

Their cellars clean, 

I wish they'd organize a squad. 

And clear the streets some day 
Of that loud pest who whistles still 
"The Blue and the Gray." 

NEWSPAPER reports of the death of W. A. Marshall 
of this city fail to state much more than that it oc- 
curred during an operation performed for relief from an 
attack of appendicitis. The peculiar advantage of dying 
under the knife rather than lingering awhile and taking a 
chance of the vermiform appendix reaching a normal con- 
dition, is understood alone by the doctors. They have a 
passion for carving the human trunk to see what there is 
inside. Often they are fooled. It is no uncommon oc- 
currence to find on inspection that the appendix is on its 
good behavior. In such cases they sew up the gash and 
bury the secret under a pile of professional ethics, unless 
the undertaker do it more effectually. Appendicitis is as 
much a fad as golf. A few years ago it was unknown. 
People occasionally had what they were content to regard 
as inflammation of the bowels, and old-fashioned doctors 
were thoughtful enough to cure them without "rubbering" 
into their disturbed interiors. Now inflammation is 
monopolized by the poor, and bowels are no longer recog- 
nized. Many a man has been solemnly informed that he 
must submit to the blade or go to glory on bis blind gut, 
has declined to be carved, and lived to grumble at his bill. 
Others have bared their troublesome bellies to the blade, 
and closed their eyes on earthly scenes forever. But all 
the time the doctors have had an enjoyable season. Vivi- 
section is a horrible practice, but if living things must be 
cut up, it would be better to select cats and dogs for the 
altar of science. At least the suffering of the individual 
would be no greater, and there would be no funeral neces- 
sary. To have useful citizens killed, not by disease but by 
the cure, is both anomalous and depressing. 

MRS. John Martin, widow, never remains long out of 
print, and never appears there in any enviable role. 
The death of her husband caused serious question as to 
reasons for it. Then she tried to get a fortune by swear- 
ing that the father of her little son had not been this hus- 
band. Since first acquiring notoriety she has panted for 
more of it, and engaged in more than one unsavory row. 
She talks much as a drnnken fishwife might, only with less 
refinement, and likes to haunt newspaper offices, where 
she tells her woes, and other things. Just now she is ac- 
cused of shamefully neglecting the little boy she had used 
to defame herself in the hope of gain, leaving him to shift 
for himself, with the result that he so nearly starved that 
his bones fairly bulged. Mrs. John should remember that 
although she has a bad record the possibility remains of 
making it worse. 

SAM Waller is no longer Secretary of the State Board 
of Pharmacy, but while he continues to be a member 
of it, the body will fail of having public respect or confi- 
dence. Waller may not be a rascal, but if he is not, the 
manifest symptoms are misleading. In public position, he 
always manages to be the center of a scandal. As one 
of the Board of Education he came into the attention of 
the Grand Jury, and narrowly, and also unfortunately, 
escaped that of the police. The Board that term was a 
disgrace to San Francisco, and Waller a disgrace to the 
Board. Why he was picked out for a new trust after hav- 
ing demonstrated his utter unworth, is one of the myster- 
ies of politics. 



ftTTt)^.N^•.Y Leorge Collins need* a word ..f rt.lv. ,. He 
rapitlly acquiring a reputation similar to that of 
J. N E, Wilson, whose connection with any case damns it 
in advance. This does not mean, necessarily, that the 
case will be lost, but that it is known at once to be a case 
that ought to be lost, that depends not on merit, but on 
beating the statute and befooling the court. Every rogue 
of a pool-seller or a bucket-shop confidence operator 
caught in his transgressions, turns to Collins for relief. It 
was Collins who bad the police enjoined from interfering 
with his law-breaking clients. A more audacious move, a 
more cheeky and preposterous assumption, has never been 
ascribed to any shystering attorney. The cause was 
wholly without merit, the restraining order the quintes- 
sence of foolishness, and when Judge Shaw set it aside he 
did not simply a wise thing but the only thing that would 
have suggested itself to a sane and honest jurist. If the 
pool-seller is stronger than the machinery devised for re- 
straint of his kind, he possesses over the burglar and the 
raider of roosts an advantage to which he has no right. 
It is time for Collins to leave off sharp practice, and be- 
gin the practice of law. 

SS to the merits of such contentions as James Taylor 
Rogers puts forth the Crier can only state total and 
unswerving non-belief. If it is right to loot the dead; if 
a bogus heir, by consenting to divvy, assumes any aspect 
of genuineness; if a witness, through refusal to answer 
questions lest he criminate himself, establishes his own in- 
nocence, then Rogers is all right. Otherwise he is all 
wrong. It is surprising to know that other lawyers, in 
personal conversation, can be found to defend him. That 
one should defend him for a fee is of course to be expected. 
Rogers appears not only as grasping and dishonest, but 
has by his truculence grossly insulted the court in which 
it was his duty to give evidence. The court sent him to 
jail, and he lied his way out; for, placed on the stand, hav- 
ing promised to testify freely, be was as contumacious as 
ever. As this is written the further action of the court is 
not of record, but unless Rogers was sent back to a cell, 
the tribunal is permeated by a spirit of forbearance more 
than human. 

SGAIN at Kreling's house is heard 
Grand operatic strains 
Where seraph-throated divas voice 

Harmonious joys and pains. 
Once more a burst of classic song 

Doth fill a long-felt need o' 
The subtle and Titanic thrills 
Of Lucia and Aida. 

Grand Opera at the Tivoli 

Is holding us in thrall — 
But they are doing cake-walk now 

At Fischer's Concert Hall. 

IT is a matter of public interest that Dora Fuhrig has 
been arrested again. This woman is a pestilence that 
walks at noonday or any other old time. She deserves to 
be in a place where her peregrinations will be limited, and 
her chance for killing erring members of her sex reduced 
to a minimum. The Fuhrig creature is a professional as- 
sassin, killing for a fee, and often killing more than the 
contract demands. She has once been sentenced to the 
penitentiary, and thanks to the weakness of the law, the 
laxity of court procedure, the unscrupulousness of attor- 
neys, and the bogus weight attached to a technicality 
that really has no weight whatever, is still free. The num- 
ber slain by Fuhrig may never be known, but occasionally 
one comes in evidence. What is the difference? There is 
none. Fuhrig doesn't care, and as her conscience has 
long been as dead as her patients, there is no reason why 
she should care. When the Board of Health shall get in- 
to a mood to quarantine something, this destroying angel 
ought to be it. She is the plague. 

SAN RAFAEL man wants $6000 for a piece of his 
nose bitten off by a neighbor without even the excuse 
of hunger, and popular sympathy will sustain bim. The 
fighter who bites should be herded with beasts; and a nose 
is an article of value to its very tip. An inch is said to be 
considerable on the end of it, and a fraction of an inch be- 
longing there, but violently absented, is considerably more. 
A man who values his nose at oniy $6000 is modest and de- 
serving. 



ft 



IO 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900. 




Something's doing with the Deweys — 

Wonder what on earth ? 
Some declare the stork is nesting 

On the happy Dewey hearth. 

Gallant George seems much inclined to 
Change the poor bird's feather; 

For he says the gentle public 
Is mistaken altogether. 

So will I, in my presumption, 

Use the license of the bard 
To declare the Dewey storK is 

Nothing but a plain canard. 

* * * 

In its recent expose of the nickel in the slot robbery the 
Examiner went to the expense of two machines, one fairly 
square and the other fairly crooked. In order to make 
the expos^ good the Examiner placed the machines on ex- 
hibition in the center of its business office. Now there is 
something about the slot machine that tempts the best of 
us. We know we are going to get the worst of it, but we 
will play. Joullin, the painter, had business in the Ex- 
aminer Building on Thursday, and on bis way to the eleva- 
tor spied the nickel traps. 

"Ah, ha!" said he, "Here's a new gamble; I've won 
theatre tickets at the California bar, but this is the first 
time I have heard of free newspapers." 

He approached the counter. The artist of one decoration 
and many joshes exchanged a fifty-cent piece for ten 
nickels. Carefully he played them in the machine. He 
had picked out the square one. The ninth nickel brought 
him a royal flush. Putting the other nickel into his pocket 
he walked over to the counter and invited one of the clerks 
to inspect the hand. 

"I guess that is good for a year's subscription," said 
Jnullin; and with a card: "Here are my name and ad- 
dress." 

"Why, that machine is not working," said the clerk, "It 
is just put up there as a horrible example." 

"Well, I've got a royal flush outside and forty-five cents 
inside," said Joullin, "and if I don't get paid one way or 
the other I will never read your old paper again." 

And the clerk explained to the painter that no gambling 
was allowed in the Hearst Building and that he did not 
know where the key was, anyway, and that Mr. Joullin 
would have to write out a formal application for the re- 
turn of his nine nickels. Joullin is doing the application 

in colors. 

♦ * * 

John Findlav, of the Miller Company, now occupies the 
same position in the Lyceum Company that was once held 
by Felix Morris, but he says that he had to come to San 
Francisco to get a real part. In the last act of A Mar- 
riage of Convenience, there enters a police official whose 
speech consists of just four lines. 

"Findlay," said Miller before the play went on, "I've 
changed my mind about giving you a week off during A 
Marriage of Convenience. There's a great part for you in 
the last act." He handed him the part, written on a 
card. Findlay was on hand promptly for the opening, 
and flawless in his part. He had the card in the palm of 
his hand, and would secretly read from it. But the third 
night, Wednesday, he nearly went to pieces. He had lost 
the card. His cue was clmost up to him; his wits were 
almost at an end — but not quite. Rushing around the 
back of the stage to the other side where the stage man- 
ager and the prompter stood, he grabbed the book of the 
play, hastily turned a page or two and tore out the one 
that contained his famous lines. He made his entrance 
with a page of manuscript in his hand and read from it 
shamelessly. 

That night Miller posted a notice on the board request- 
ing the company to appear at 10 o'clock the next morning 
at a special rehearsal for Mr. Findlay. And everybody 



turned up to see the fun. Twenty times at least in suc- 
cession did Miller coax Findlay through the entrance and 
the lines. And then in his loveliest manner he addressed 
the company, saying: "Ladies and gentlemen, I believe 
Mr. Findlay has invited us all to sup with him after the 
performance." Findlay hadn't. But he lived up to the 

suggestion. 

• * * 

In the cold gold town of Dawson there is a French count, 
Armand by name, who runs what he is pleased to call a 
rotisserie. The count is both proprietor and chef, and 
chief among his patrons is that famous epicure and bon 
vivant, Jere Lynch. Dawson has theatres among other 
troubles. Soubrettes are almost as plentiful there as they 
are in San Francisco, and even in that tragic clime Jere 
Lynch sustains his reputation for hospitality. Two or three 
nights a week Mr. Lynch gives a dinner to which he bids 
the prettiest and the hungriest and the thirstiest sou- 
brettes in the Klondike. Wine flows like Niagaras, and the 
air is full of poetry written and recited by th6 Hon. Jere 
Lynch, who is no slouch of a litterateur and elocutionist 
himself. Mr. Lynch takes great interest in the restau- 
rant; he says that it is his sacred duty to teach the Klon- 
diker what and bow to eat. When the days are dull and 
Mr. Lynch is at a loss for a subject for his literary en- 
deavors he writes the menus for his friend the count; 
writes them in verse. Mr. Lynch's Ode to the Broiled 
Walrus Steak is said to be one of the finest gems in all 
gastronomic literature. I hope soon to have the pleasure 
of publishing it. But as Burgess would say, I'd rather 

print than eat it. 

* * * 

When all these gladsome smiles I see, 

Where once were frosty faces, 
When nods I see on every hand 

From every one who passes, 

When some will recognize my face 

Who never did before, 
And genial feeling seems to grow 

Each moment more and more, 

. I ask myself "Pray, when did I 
To public favor climb?" 
Then I recall that it is now 
Almost election time. 



Hon. John J. De Haven of the United States Court will 
probably enjoy this story if it comes under his legal eye. 
The Judge, you see, is one of those genial old gentlemen 
whom a certain amount of public renown could never raise 
to that altitude which maketh a man to look down upon 
the days of his youth and the little boy who ate huckle- 
berry pie in the desk next to him in the little red school- 
house on the hill. The Hon. John J. has a part interest 
in the Strathmore, where his apartments are located, and 
the elevator man of the same establishment is an old-time 
friend of the Judge's. So, it happens, the Judge has got 
into the habit of dropping and rising with the elevator 
a couple of hours each evening while he and the operator 
kill the moments discussing the way things were done 
when they were boys. The other night a new lodger, who 
wanted the third floor badly, entered the elevator at the 
first floor and found the Judge in sole possession. 

"Third floor," said the young man. 

The Judge took the lever in hand and sent the lift three 
floors with the grace and accuracy of an expert. As the 
passenger was about to land the Judge, appreciating the 
situation, plucked the youth by the sleeve and said, "How 
did you like the trip?" 

"Oh, I can't complain," replied the other in astonish- 
ment. 

"Well," chuckled the Judge, "I have been on the bench 
for some years, but I must say you are the first man I 
have sent up for three who hasn't declared that it was all 
a mistake." 

And the Judge is chuckling yet. 

New things in Pictures, Paintings, Statuary, and other Art Goods, 
as well as new patterns in Cut Glass, Crockery, and Glassware, re- 
ceived daily a S. & G Gump Co., 113 Geary street. 

With army officers Jessie Moore "AA" whiskey is a very popular 
drink. 



August 4. 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NBW9 LETTER 



11 



WHAT A FELLOW SEES 

AWAY FROM HOME. 



LET me tell you how they celebrated July 14th at P 1 
3. m. we were awakened by a band playing 
under our window. All the happenings of this d;i 
sanctioned and paid for by the Government. Got up, had 
breakfast, and strolled along the Boulevards toward 
Champs Elysees where we had another breakfast. On 
our way, at all the public squares and street corners we 
stopped to watch the acrobats and jugglers, who perform 
in the streets and pass their bats. After breakfast we 
took a boat down the Seine river to Long-champs, where 
we saw the President and the Shah of Persia review the 
troops of France. There were over 600,000 people pres- 
ent, and the cavalry was something grand. I did not 
have a ticket, so made a bluff with my exposition pass 
(which is good for six months and admits me to all 
theatres, balls, etc.) and it worked O. K. But a police- 
man stopped me at the grandstand gate and did not want 
to let me in unless I bought a ticket of admission, which 
costs 20 francs ($4). I gave the cop one franc (10 centimes), 
and he nearly dropped dead. He ushered me to one of 
the best seats in the place, and even allowed me to stand 
up on the seat for a good view. They will do nearly any- 
thing here or in London for twenty-five cents. Well, 
after the review and dinner, we started out to see the 
sights. It seemed to me that all the world was in Paris. 
The streets, cafes, and everything were crowded. All 
omnibuses, cabs, etc., were stopped. The cafes had 
their tables out in the middle of the street (instead of on 
the sidewalks as is the custom here). Thousands of 
electric lights were stretched across every thoroughfare, 
just like Market street was in San Francisco when the 
First Californias returned from the war, except that 
each light was enclosed in an artificial flower, and be- 
tween each light on each string were hundreds of flow- 
ers. Besides, in all the trees along the Boulevards there 
were clusters of red Chinese lanterns, and at the Place 
de Concord and Champs Elysees the sight was simply 
fairyland. At about every fifth corner there was a band 
of music on a platform, and after 11 p. m. the people 
danced the streets as if they were ballrooms. 

About midnight we went over to the Latin Quarter to 
see the real sights, and I tell you what, they were pretty 
raw. At the caftls, and even in the streets, the stu- 
dents would tear nearly all the clothes off one another, 
and also the women, and after a few picons, absinthe, 
etc., they thought they were in the Garden of Eden. 

Once in a while a cab would make its appearance. Some 
one would yell to the driver, "Are you at liberty?" If 
empty he would say "Yes," and the bunch would then 
yell "Hurrah for Liberty," and then unhitch the horse, 
take the wheels off the cab, and make the driver drink 
until he was full. Then put them all in a heap (driver, 
cab wheels and horse) and leave them there. The police 
dared not show its face. Everything goes on the Wth. 
Well, this lasted all night. I saw Colonel Kowalski at the 
Moulin Rouge last week. That is another pretty warm 
show; also the Garden de Paris. At these resorts all the 
swell "babies" are to be found. Girls dancing, elegantly 
gowned, and the sportiest of the sporty are the chief fea- 
tures. The dances are different from anything ever seen 
in public in America. Tbey never stop at the "calf" or 
the "garter." This is allowed by the authorities, and the 
police and soldiers on duty at these places enjoy it as 
much as anyone else. 

Paris, July 16, 1900. F. A. M. 

There are whiskies and whiskies, and much depends on the kind 
you drink. Bad whiskey means bad health, bad temper and a bad 
habit. The J. F. Cutter brand is smooth as satin, delicate of flavor, 
and nourishing. It tickles the palate of the fastidious drinker. E. 
Martin & Co., 54 First street, are sole agents for the United 
States . 

Along the line of the California Northwestern Railway you will 
find all sorts of resorts to fit your taste and purse. There are 
springs, cooling-off places, camping spots, hunting ground— every- 
thing, in fact, that the vacationer can desire. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 



New Map of 

California 

FREE 



A new map of the State of California, 
right up to date, will be given free to any 
applicant either by mail or in person. 
Address Santa Fe Office, 628 Market St., 
San Francisco. 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 



The Organizers of the 

OPHIR OIL CO., 

Have arranged with the CALIFORNIA SAFE DEPOSIT AND 
TRUST COMPANY to hold sufficient securities in trust for the 
purchasers of Ophir Oil Stock to INSURE HOLDERS OF THIS 
STOCK AGAINST LOSS. 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Company shall fail to produce oil 
in paying quantities sufficient to bring its stock to par value (one 
dollar per share), purchasers will receive back, with accrued interest 
THE ENTIRE AMOUNT PAID IN BY THEM FOR STOCK. 

The securities thus held in trust are adequate, and an investment 
in Ophir Oil Stock is as secure as a United States Government bond, 
and vastly superior to deposits in Banks of Savings, for the reason 
that it combines 

Absolute Security with 
immense possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "reading between the lines" in this 
proposition. Whatever happens to the Ophir Oil Company your 
investment is safe. You cannot lose. Only a limited amount of 
this SECURED STOCK is ottered for sale. While it lasts it can be 
had for 

75c. per Share 

Fully paid and non-assessable. Sold only in blocks of $500 and np- 
ward. Common stock, unsecured, can be had at FIFTY CENTS 
per share in certificates of twenty shares and over. 

OPHIR OIITCOMPANY. 

Room 14, Fifth Floor, Mills Building, San Francisco, California. 
Represented in San Francisco by J. P. MASSIE. 



ia 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, I900. 




The management of the Bachelor's Oil 
A Progressive Company is pushing work with an expedi- 
Oil Company, tion which is highly creditable to them- 
selves while assuring to the shareholders, 
who recognize that the development of their property 
will be carried on to a successful conclusion. Under an 
experienced driller the boring of wells upon the large 
territory owned by the company will be advanced without 
delay in an effort to make the property Dot only self-sus- 
taining, but productive to a degree which will furnish a 
handsome remuneration in the form of dividends. The 
confidence reposed in the managers of the Bachelor's Oil 
Company is shown daily by the demand for its shares, 
which have been disposed of in large amounts during the 
past fortnight. Having in addition to the sections se- 
lected for oil development a large tract of land which will 
be marketed eventually at high figures, the profits of this 
company are likely to be large in the near future, a fact 
which undoubtedly has not been overlooked by conserva- 
tive investors. By holding these lands for a time their 
value is certain to advance, owing to their location, which 
is contiguous to some of the heaviest producing wells in 
the State. Poso Creek and Sunset District, in Kern 
County, now rank as chief among the producing oil fields 
of the State, and the steady growth in the value of prop- 
erty located there must be accepted as the best indication 
of the permanency and importance of the new oil industry 
of California. A year hence oil will be king, and the in- 
vestors of to-day will reap the benefit of a pre-destined 
expansion of the business which others have been too 
short-sighted to appreciate in its earlier stages. In the 
Poso District the Bachelor's Company are now sinking 
two wells, and at the same time one is being drilled on its 
land in Sunset District, with the very best of indications 
for a flow of oil. The latter boring is not far away from 
well No. 17 of Jewett & Blodgett, which is already 
attracting the attention of oil men all over the State by 
its production. The office of the Bachelor's Oil C impany 
is located in the Hearst Building, in charge of Ambrose 
Harris, Secretary. 

The Co-operative Oil Syndicate is or- 
An Oil Enterprise on ganized upon a plan, which, as its 
Co-operative Plan, name suggests, will enable every 
shareholder to come in on the ground 
floor and participate in the profits of the concern. The 
company owns four 100-acre tracts in the richest portions 
of the great Panoche and Coalinga oil belts in Fresno 
County, which it proposes to develop upon a bas'.s of co- 
operation among the shareholders, which wili commend it- 
self to all who desire a safe and lucrative investment. 
Starting with the proposition that the land owned by the 
company is the best of its kind in the State, and bound to 
be prolific in oil from the fact that it prospects well in all 
directions over the surface, the proposition for its develop- 
ment is as folows: Instead of working off a large capital 
among the manv the capital stock has been divided into 
100 shares of $250 each, giving each holder a good interest 
in the business and a large share of the profits. Of these 
fifty shares have already been taken up, leaving only fifty 
shares on hand for subscription. An investor can either 
take a whole, half, quarter or eighth of a share, which 
can be obtained upon a cash payment to be agreed upon 
and $10 monthly thereafter at 8 per cent per annum upon 
the deferred payments until fully paid, thereby putting the 
shares within reach of salaried people. With the amount 
subscribed the Co operative Oil Syndicate will be in a posi- 
tion to commence drilling at once, with sufficient funds on 
hand to keep on sinking wells all over its ground for the 
next two years, giving the preference in the selection of 
labor to its shareholders. It is the desire of the syndicate 
to begin drilling by September 15th, following as closely 
as possible the methods of the celebrated Home Oil Com- 



pany, which started out upon the same plan less than two 
years ago, its 100 shares of capital stock being now valued 
at the rate of $-4,500 per share, the dividends paid monthly 
being at the rate of $160 for each of the original shares. 
The proposition of the Co-operative Oil Syndicate is one 
which should appeal to investors, and as it undoubtedly will 
those who wish to subscribe should lose no time in sending in 
their names to S. T. Allen, manager, at the office of the 
syndicate, No. 11 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Boring is going on rapidly on 
Rook-Oil Company Pushing well No. 1 of the California 
Work With Vigor. Rock-Oil Company, and on July 

30th the drill was down seven 
hundred feet, passing through the blue shale which in- 
variably is found capping the oil sand. The strata thus 
far encountered is identical with that of the Independence 
and other oil-producing companies in the vicinity of the 
Rock-Oil territory. Every well hitherto bored in this sec- 
tion has proved a success, with a steady individual pro- 
duction of not less than 100 barrels per day. The Rock- 
Oil Company possesses every facility for work on a large 
scale, with plentv of water brought directly to the ground 
by a pipe line 3,000 feet long, while a pipe line now being 
constructed will enable the management to market their 
product at a minimum cost. This is one of the companies 
which is situated in a locality already proven, a safe guar- 
antee that the Rock-Oil Company will soon join the list of 
producers, with a promising future in store for its share- 
holders. The company is still offering its stock below par 
as an inducement for the subscription of funds necessary 
to complete its development. When this is completed and 
oil is struck in well No. 1, which may now take place at any 
moment, the shares will enhance in value very rapidly. 
The company's offices are in the Hearst Building, where 
intending investors can get all the particulars they wish 
about this valuable property. 

The stock of the London Oil Company, 
The London Oil which has the largest acreage of any corn- 
Company, pany organized in the Fresuo-San Benito 
district, has been very much in demand 
during the past week. Five thousand acres is a vast body 
of land, and it is not all in one tract, but in several 
selected tracts that were secured in this district before 
the rush for lands was created. Going into this district 
and picking your choice is not possible now as it was when 
the London managers secured their land. The desira- 
bility of this stock is enhanced by several items — first, the 
valuable character of the land; second, the propositions 
now under consideration for the subleasing of portions of 
the land and the formation of subsidiary companies; and 
third, the proximity of these lands to a producing com- 
pany's well. 

Should success ultimately crown 
British Factories the efforts of some promoters in 
Combine Their Trade. London the great Portland cement 
industry in England will in the 
future be controlled by a "trust." Out of an annual pro- 
duction of 1,700,000 tons by the British factories on the 
rivers Thames and Medway the new combine controls 
about 1,570,000 tons, putting it practically in command of 
the situation. It will take somewhere in the neighbor- 
hood of £40,000,000 to swing this gigantic concern, of 
which about one-third will be absorbed by the owners of 
the various works. In addition to this another "trust" is 
announced for the purpose of controlling a number of the 
leading foundries in England and the North of Ireland. 
Yankee notions continue to catch on across the Atlantic, 
although in this case the idea is a little threadworn on this 
side of the Atlantic. 

Business has been more active recently 
The Pine Street n Pine street, particularly in the South- 
Market. eQ d shares on the strength of a more 

promising prospect in the crosscut now 
reaching out west for a ledge which shows well defined 
croppings on the surface. The Northend stocks have also 
shown some strength of late, and on the whole the market 
has a better tone. Good progress is being made in the 
establishment of the new electric power plant, and it will 
only now be the matter of a short time until the change of 
system in working mines and mills will be carried into 
effect. 



August 4, 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



•3 



R )S9 Browne, the well-known min- 
Qrau Valley Continual to g engineer, has just returned 
to Prosper. from Grass Valley, where he has 

been expertint; the irround in dis- 
pute between the Pennsylvania ami W. Y. 1' 
paries, the basis of the suit which will shortlv ootM up 
before the United States court in this city. Mr. Browne 
will (rive expert testimony in the case in the inter. 
the Pennsylvania Company. He speaks very highly of 
Grass Valley, which still maintains the lend as the most 
active and prosperous mining camp in the State. 

The only change in the market for local 
The Local Stock shares during the past week has been a 
Market. flutter in Gas and Electric, new invest- 

ment buyers coming in and taking the 
price up with their purchases as long as the demand lasts. 
The prospects for this company are more reassuring, and 
the low price brought in buyers. The price of sugars and 
other industrials are well maintained, with a moderate de- 
mand and very light offerings of stock. A number of new 
bond issues are promised for the near future. 

FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning July 27 th and 
ending August 2d. 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS 

Contra Cosl»5 - -; 15.000 @ 106-106% 

Los Angls Ky 5°i...l7.uou & 1o4%-iu5 

N P Coast By 5 2.O0O 9 106-106% 

Oakland Transit 6% l.OUU (3 116'j 
Oceanic Bonds 5%.. 4.000 9105 



S F&SJ V By 5H-15.000 ® 119X 
SPol Arizona 654... 2.000 9 U1H 

S P Branch 6 W.cxw @ 13.3 

S V W W 4% 2 Mte.. 2,000 9 10.'%-102% 



Water. Shares. 

Contra Costa Water.. 10 
Spring Valley Water. 173 
Gas a;td Electric. 

Equitable Oas. 400 

Oakland Gas.. 165 

PaclHc Gas Imp'v'nL 100 

Pacific Gas Imp ISO 

Gas and Electric 2178 

SFGas 200 

Street Railroads. 

Market Street 70 

Powders. 

GianL 91 

Viaorit 900 



H'st 



6S% 
94« 



50 

43 
51 
55 

5 

64 



STOCKS. 

L'st Sugar Stocks. 
6S's Hana P Co 



H'st L'st 



M 



87 

31% 

25'4 

26% 

30% 

410 

275 

117% 
08% 
93 

227 



87 

31 

25 

26% 

30% 

410 

275 

1163* 
98 
93 

227 



Shares. 

10 

Hawaiian 10 

Honakaa ..1015 

33£ Hutchinson 4H5 

49^4 Ot.omea 200 

4.^ Paauhau S PI Co 455 

50 Banes. 

51% Bank of California 60 

5 First Na'tl Bank 10 

Miscellaneous. 

G&s Alaska Packers 110 

Cal Fruit Canners..,.. 25 

86% Oceanic S 8 Co 25 

3% Fireinans Fund 6 

The transactions for the week amount to 5, 70S shares and GH.OOO 
bonds, against 7.851 shares and 54.000 bonds for the week previous. 

Gas & Electric sold up to 55 last Saturday, falling back to 52 dur- 
ing the week. 

•Sugar stocks are quiet, with some of the stocks at lower prices 
than last week. Market-street is firm at Gl. Powder stocks have 
been traded in. Vigorit sold for S%. Water stocks have been little 
traded in. Bonds were lightly traded in and at high prices. 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 

Asked Bid. 

50 00 Sanitary Reduction 

Nev. Co. Narrow Gauee 

5 00 Railroad 15 00 

25 00 Abbey Land Imp. Co 1 00 

22 50 
Oil Stocks. 

50 Grand Centra] 95 

55 BiePanoche 

09% Bakersfield-Fresno... 
Minino Stocks. 

Argonaut 4 00 I .a Fortuna 2 15 

Central Eureka 1 10 1 25 Norton Sound 10 15 

Dreisam 25 Victor Gold Mines 50 

Dutch 25 Columbus Con 20 

N. Lieht iCape Nome) 12% Lia-huier 90 ...... 

Santa Rosalia (Mexico) 40 Sea Level 5o 

Brunswick 23 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks flisted and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by 

Joseph B. Toplitz, Stock Broker, 
Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Booms 9 and 10. 330 Pine street. 



American Liquid Air 

Golden Gate Beet Sugar 

Company 

Sea Power Co 

Union Sugar Co 

Sunset (original) 

Fresno-Alpha 

Mt. Diablo Oil Co 



Bid. 



Asked 
I 00 



75 

20 00 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams Build- 
ing, N .E. corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 

If you have suits, gowns, gloves, laces, tapestries, ribbons, or any- 
thing else that requires renovation, send them to the Spaulding 
Cleaning and Dyeing establishment, 127 Stockton street. Here things 
are cleaned in the most approved fashion. The best of workmen and 
apparatus are employed, and the prices are reasonable. Spaulding 
will make your husband's old suit of clothes look like new. 

Has it ever struck you that you can buy Jessie Moore "AA" whis- 
key for almost the same price that is paid for ordinary whiskey? 
Your dealer has it. 

Aftee twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Japan- 
ese Fine Art Store h as moved to 214 Post street. 

Artistic picture framing, reasonable prices, at Kennedy & Rab- 
john's, 21 Post street. 



The Co-operative 
Oil Syndicate 



Hi M' 1 

\o. II Nonlgomcry 
in I rancisco 



S. T. ALLEN, Manager. 

Comprising 100 Promoter Shares of $250 each. 



50 



Remaining Promoter Shares . . 
are now Offered to the Public 



WHOLE SHARE $250.00 

HALF SHARE 127.50 

QUARTER SHARE 65.00 

EIGHTH SHARE 33.00 

Payable $10 per Month 

The oil lands of the ayndicate comprise four separate 100 acre 
tracts in the Great Panoche and Coalinga oil belts, Fresno County, 
Cal., a short distance from Union Oil Company's five producing oil 
wells. This great opportunity is now offered for the investor to get 
in on the ground floor. 

Further particulars at office, 

11 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



London Oil Company 



Rooms 6 & 7, Eighth Floor, 
Mills Building, S. F„ Cal. 



Authorized Capital, $700,000 
San Francisco Nat'l Bank, Treas. 



75,000 Shares 

of the Treasury Stock have been placed 
on sale at only :::::: 

25c. per Share 

This Company owns 5000 acres at the junction of Union OH 
Belt and Coalinga Oil Belt ::::::: : 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS— G. H. Phi lips of San Jose (Capitalist), 
President; J. M. Gleaves of San Francisco (U. M. Surveyor General J, Vice- 
President; Hon. James G. Maguireof San Francisco (ex-United Stales Con- 
gressman), Director; C. H. Dunsmoor of San Francisco (Secretary Bank 
Commissioners). Director: O. A. l-ane of San Francisco (Secrotary Fresno 
AlphaOil Company), Secretary and General Manager. T. A. Kirki'Atricic, 
General Superintendent. 

PEERLESS OIL CO. 

Is prepared to supply 

Fuel Oil by th Carload 

in any quantity, at any railroad station. Address 
Room 47, 8th Floor. Mills Building, San Francisco. 

SANS SOUCI, 

Private home for patients. Equipped 
with the latest scientific appliances. 
Chronic Diseases a Specialty. 
Charges reasonable. Da. Schirman, Con- 
sulting Physician. 
1409 Van Ness Avenue, Near Bush Street. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



August 4, 1900. 




s^Ssirarcl 



nsurance 



- - 




THERE is id London, England, an association called 
"The British Fire Prevention Committee of LondoD." 
Its purpose is to make practical tests with regard to the 
acquirement and dissemination of knowledge with regard 
to the construction of buildings of slow combustion, and, 
as its name implies, the prevention of fires by the im- 
provement of the physical hazard. Below are excerpts 
from some of its bulletins, which will be found interesting 
to scientific fire underwriters: 

No. 50 deal* with the test of a floor of ordinary soft wood joists 
tilled with concrete, the concrete, however, affording protection to 
the joists from below, and the soffit comprising a plaster ceiling on 
"expanded metal" lathing, this lathing having at the same time 
been employed for purposes of construction in place of the usual 
centring which is generally applied where concrete fillings are 
specified. The object of the test was to record ihe eflect of a fire of 
two hours, commencing with a temperature of 500 deg. Fahr., grad- 
ually increasing to 2.300 deg. Fahr., followed by the application of a 
stream of water for two minutes. The floor was 10 ft. by 10 ft., and 
was loaded with 100 lbs. per foot distributed. In 28 minutes the 
plaster began to fall in patches from the ceiling, and continued to 
fall till the end of the test, when water was applied and further 
plaster was washed away. The temperature was gradually raised to 
2,100 deg. Fahr. No olher effect than that mentioned was notice- 
able, and at the conclusion of the test the floor was intact and car- 
ried its load. No. 40 records the tire test with patent floor, the 
material being described as "a mixture, by means of water, of 
plaster, hydraulic lime, some sort of neutral material, such as coke, 
sand. etc.. and a fireproof material, such as asbestos, with an addi- 
tion of sulphuric acid." The object of the test was to show the 
eflect of a fire of an hour's duration, with a temperature commenc- 
ing about300 deg. Fahr., running ;radually up to 1,800 deg. Fahr. 
In 59 minutes, when the gas was turned off, the soffit appeared red 
hot. Cracks surrounding the floor were observed, as well as a 
longitudinal crack. The cracks were fairly open in places to the 
extent of about y, inch. The material of which the floor was com- 
posed crumbled away at the touch when broken for examination. 
Publication No. 10 deals with doors, and should be studied with 
those dealing with similar door tests, especially with the test de- 
scribed in publication No. 2G, where the materials used were Amer- 
ican oak and Moulmein teak. In No. 40 is recorded the test with a 
2-inch framed Austrian oak door, with 2-inch solid panels; and also 
a 2-inch framed American walnut door, with 2 inch solid panels. 
The door openings were about 3 ft. 3 in. by Oft. 9 in., and the doors 
opened inwards, or to the fire side. Fire was applied from one side 
for an hour, gradually increasing to a temperature of fully 2,000 
deg. Fahr. With regard to the oak door, in 33 minutes, tempera- 
ture about 1,900 deg., flame appeared through top of panel; in 51 
minutes, maximum temperature having been passed, upper panels 
and muntiu and top rail fell out; in 55 minutes remaining portion 
of door collapsed. Flame appeared over top rail of walnut door in 
15 minutes; in 42 minutes flame appeared through joint between 
top muntin and upper panel; in 58 minutes the door collapsed. 
* * * 

Insurance Commissioner Van Cleave of Illinois and 
Auditor Cornell of Nebraska are making faces at each 
other over the fence. The Insurance Commissioner of 
Illinois has decided to apply the stringent Illinois laws to 
Nebraska fraternal organizations and insurance com- 
panies, and the Nebraska Insurance Commissioner, acting 
under the advice of the Attorney-General, says that he 
has the power to examine the Illinois companies doing 
business 10, Nebraska and revoke their licenses, if he so 
decide, and his action could not be reviewed. He threat- 
ens to start in to examine the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, and has already refused to issue annual licenses to the 
Illinois companies, though they are still doing business in 
Nebraska. 



The British Military Governor of Pretoria telegraphs 
that all tbe securities recorded in the official register as 
having been deposited by insurance companies in com- 
pliance with the law of that country have been found and 
are now in possession of British authorities. This will be 
good news to the British and American companies who 
are interested. 



Deputy Insurance Commissioner Heifner of Washington 
has returned to his own bailiwick after laboring with the 
fire underwriters of San Francisco with regard to the ad- 
justment of taxes which were due his department. He 
collected deficiencies from the companies who had under- 
paid and returned the surplus to those who had overpaid, 
both actions being rather peculiar, and making the man- 
agers wonder what the next insurance commissioner would 
do when he came to San Francisco. 

* * * 

Colonel William Macdonald is now signing policies as 
Pacific Coast manager of the Orient Insurance Company of 
Hartford; D. E. Miles assistant manager. The Orient 
will now take the position amongst fire insurance com- 
panies on the coast to which its strength, age and solidity 
entitle it. The business of the Orient will be run and man- 
aged as a separate company, and its agents will be pro- 
tected, and no change whatever will be made which will 
in the least be calculated to destroy the individuality of 

the Orient. 

* * * 

An Exchange is guilty of the following: 

A teacher of a village school examining a class of small boys in 
mental arithmetic, gave this problem to the little son of a local in- 
surance agent: "If your father should get ?i,000 of fire insurance 
premiums to-day, with a commission of 15 per cent, what would he 
have I" "He would have a fit," was the quick reply. 

Presumably because he only got 15 per cent commission. 

* * # 

The Chicago Guarantee Fund Life, organized in 1884, 
doing business on the stipulated premium plan, has just 
gone into the hands of a receiver. 

* * * 

L. B. Edwards has arranged for the city agency of the 
American Fire Insurance Company of Newark, under the 
firm style of L. B. Edwards & Co., with offices at Sansome 
and California streets. 

Bernard Faymonville of the Fireman's Fund is recuper- 
ating and taking his vacation at Webber Lake, and the 
News Letter is pleased to learn that he is rapidly regain- 
ing his normal health. 

Curtis & Merrill have been appointed city agents of the 
New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, with offices at 
407 Montgomery street. 

Herbert Folger of the Phoenix has returned from his 
Eastern trip. 

The Norwalk Fire Insurance Company has reinsured its 
Eastern business with the Orient and its Western busi- 
ness with the London and Lancashire. 

The Germania Fire Insurance Company is to enter Cal- 
ifornia at once. 

William Sexton of the Fireman's Fund is taking a well- 
earned vacation. 

Horatio Beveridge, 220 California street, so well known 
on the street, has been appointed city agent of the Orient 
of Hartford. 

The Teething Period 
Is the trying time in baby's life. Proper feeding then is most essen- 
tial. To secure uniformity of diet use Gail Borden Eagle Brand Con- 
densed Milk. Book "Babies" free. Borden's Condensed Milk Co. 
N. Y. 

Camping locations, hotels, mineral springs, and resorts for all peo- 
ple at all prices, may be found along the line of the California North- 
western railway. The season is just right for a cool rest and recu- 
peration. 

As atonic, nothing in the world beats Jessie Moore "A A" whiskey. 








LONDON ASSURANCE. 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,760 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,376 

Assets 18.186,146 

Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets 2,602,060 



August 4 lyoo. 



BAI fRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



»5 



Da IDA B. SPENCE. OPTICIAN. 

THIS is the 
day i 
rialisU and the 
day of women. 
Mrs. Ida I). 
Spence, the fa- 
mous physician 
of the Sao 
Francisco Op- 
tical Co., 837 
Kearny street, 
is a living tes- 
timonial to the 
fact that the 
women are 
prominent in 
the more seri- 
ous professions 
as well as in the 
lighter crafts. 
The only prac- 
ticing woman 
optician on the 
Pacific Coast, she is an honorably conspicuous figure in 
the world of medicine and surgery. She is graduated 
from the ophthalmic colleges of Chicago, Omaha, and 
London. 

Tukre is more Catarrh in this section of the country than all other dis- 
eases put together, and until the last few years was supposed to he incur- 
able. For a great many years doctors pronounced it ft local disease, ftnd 
prescribed local remrdies. and by constantly failing; to cure with local treat- 
ment, pronounced it incurable. Science has proven catarrh to be a consti- 
tutional disease, and. therefore, requires constitutional treatment, flail's 
Catarrh Cure, manufactured by F.J. Cheney & Co., Toledo. Ohio, is the only 
constitutional cure on the market. It is taken internally in doses from 10 
drops to a teaspoonful. It acts directly on the blood and mucous surfaces 
of the system. They offer one hundred dollars for any case it fails to cure. 
Send for circulars and testimonials. Address. 

P. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo. O. 
<*£~Sold by Druggists. 75c. 

Hall's Family Fills are the best. 



INSURANCE 




The choicest club whiskey is Jessie Moore "AA, 
life it is in great demand . 



and in club 





,i$$fF& Solid 

J! f i. Secure 
»W/' Wr PHOOftE9 J IVE ■* 
1 1 BWirV •' KTHEPACIFICMtfWAL i| 
J £V BHBT' A of California J 

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The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 
(Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders, $11,000,000 

Kilgarif & Beavee, General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Voogt, General Agent Accident Department. 
Pacific Mutual Building. S. F. 

Orient Insurance Go. of Hartford, 00™ 

Assets. $2,594,889.32. Net Surplus. 8814.045.03 

Pacific Coast Department : 315 Montgomery Street, S. F. 

D. E. Mii.es. Assistant Manager. Wm. Macdokald, Manager 

HORATIO BEVERIDGE, City Agent, 

220 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, $2,250,000 Assets, $10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 



FIRC, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 
PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF M ANrllKsTKlf ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

OHAS. A. LATON. Manager. 439 California street. S. F. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Founded A. D. 1792 



nsurance 



Uompany of / lorth A 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENS. 

rald-up Capital.. $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders $5 022,016 

JAMES D. BALLEY. General Agent. 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100 Assets. $24 ,034, 110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. $9,612,455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital. $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building. 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS. Manager 
Hoorer & Lent. City Agents. 14 Post street 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence- Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents 413 California street. S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD. San Francisco agent. 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRLE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, $3,000,000 Gross Assets. 812,808.395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $7,631,926 
H, L. Roff, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of Its agents and the insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment op Losses 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 

N. 9CHLESINGER, City Agent 304 Montgomery street San Francisco 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900. 



PLEASURE TRIPS. 



Vamos 



Mexico. 



A NEW ERA BROUGHT ABOUT BY TRANSPORTATION 
COMPANIES. 

IT may be justly said of the present season that it marks 
an era in pleasure travel in nearly all parts of California, 
on account of the cheap rates which have been made by 
the transportation companies. 
t c ^.._ .a/ ... The very latest move is in behalf of 

To bee Other Words. .1 t\ti tt *ii. *. • n>\. 

the Mt. Hamilton trip. The com- 
bined managements of the Mt. Hamilton Stage Co. and 
Hotel Vendome in San Jose, have placed on sale in the 
Southern Pacific ticket offices of San Francisco, Oakland. 
Alameda and Berkeley, two round-trip tickets from these 
points, which include transportation and all expenses. 
One is a Saturday-Sunday ticket, for $8 00. which entitles 
the purchaser to a day and a quarter at Hotel Vendome 
in addition to the trip; and the other is good any day, 
gives a half day more at the hotel, and costs $8.50. This 
rate is really about one-third less than the regular cost, 
and should easily place Mt. Hamilton in the front rank of 
famous trips. 

. , _ . _ , The Southern Pacific has recently 

Lake Tahoe Favored. added aQ attraction to Lake Tah / e 

by establishing a ten-day rate from the Bay cities of 
$13.30, a reduction of twenty per cent of the regular sea- 
son rate. It is also giving Saturday to Monday excursions 
for $10, which is indeed absurdly cheap. 

Something new and quite out of the 
ordinary in the way of tours is an ex- 
cursion to Mexico in a special train, which has just been 
announced by the Southern Pacific for November 14th. 
The rate from San Francisco will be $80, and from Los 
Angeles, $70. Other points along the line will enjoy pro- 
portionate rates. This excursion will be under the 
management of Wm. H. Menton, the Southern Pacific's 
well-known excursion agent, who is well acquainted in 
Mexico, speaks the language, and has arranged many 
incidental attractions. 

Any Southern Pacific agent will cheerfully give all de- 
sired information about these trips. Call on them. 

On the Shores of Now that the school vacations have 
Lake Tahoo. come to an end, there are plenty of 
accommodations at the various resorts 
on the shores of the beautiful Lake Tahoe. The weather 
at this season is most delightful, and now that a rail- 
road instead of a stage line is in operation from 
Truckee to Tahoe, the trip has additional charms for the 
fastidious pleasure-seeker. McKinney's is one of the 
oldest and most popular places on the lake. The present 
proprietors, the Murphy Brothers, are living up to tradi- 
tions. The stage from McKinney's takes you to Rubicon 
Springs, one of the special sights of California, where fly- 
fishing in the Rubicon River, is perfection. Between 
Emerald Bay, on Lake Tahoe, and Tallac is Cascade Lake, 
situated on the private grounds of Dr. Brigham, where 
visitors are always welcome. Near it are the White 
Cloud Falls, whose leap is more than two hundred feet. 
The Hotel Tallac has a reputation the world over. Either 
in the main building or in the surrounding cottages one 
may have all the comforts of the metropolis and the most 
superb scenery. Busseau is seven miles from Tallac, near 
the boundary between California and Nevada, and is noted 
as the starting place for equestrians to Freel's Peak, the 
loftiest of Tahoe's mountains. A short distance beyond is 
the famous old State Line House, now known as the Lake 
Side House. Although the name has changed, its pioneer 
fame remains and has a large circle of patrons. On the 
Nevada side of Lake Tahoe is Glenbrook, the late terminus 
of the Carson stage-line, and the base of the Carson Lum- 
ber Company's extensive mills. There you will find two 
well-conducted hotels, the Dirigo and the Lake Shore 
House. Glen Alpine Springs are seven miles south of 
Tallac, in a wild, picturesque region. Ten miles from 
Truckee the road branches off into a locality known as 
Bear Valley, where one may find a cluster of log cottages, 
and a main hotel buiding known as "Deer Park Inn," 
unique and characteristic. There are two camps at Lake 
Tahoe this season, one at Glenbrook and the other at 



Rubicon Park, which are conducted by David A. Curry in 
the same excellent manner that has characterized his 
management of the camping excursions in the Yellowstone 
Park and in Yosemite in the last ten years. 

The summer is not over; it bas only commenced, in fact; and 
now is the time to get to the cool fresh country. There are hun- 
dreds of places on the line of the California Northwestern Uailway. 



When that tired feeling comes along, sidetrack it with Jesse 
Moore "AA" — the best whiskev in the land. 



Oducation al. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Domlnlo. 
Full college course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Vallej- 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael. San Rafael. Ca). 



Irving Institute. 



Boarding and day school lor young ladies, 
2120 California street, will reopen AUGUST 
0,1900. Accredited to the Universities; pri- 
mary department for children ; carriage will 

call. 

Rev. Edward B. Church, A. M. 



Principal 



HEALD'S 



Business College 



24 Post street, San Francisco. 



Bookkeeping, business practice, 
shorthand, typing, languages, telegraphy, English 
brunches, electrical, civil and mining engineering, assaying, blow pipe, geol- 
og> , mineralogy, surveying, mechanical drawing, etc.; 25 teachers; individ- 
ual instruction: 200 graduate* annually in positions; students can enter any 
time. New eighty-page catalogue free. 

Mills College and Seminary. 

Grants diplomas and Confers degrees; seminary course ac- 
credited to the Universities; rare opportunities offered in 
music, art and elocution. Thirty - fifth year ; fall term 
opens AUGUST 8, 1900. Write for catalogue to 
Mrs. C. T. Mills, President. Mills Colleee P. O.. Cal. 



H. J. Stewart 



Teacher of Vocal and 



Will resume instruction August 1, 1900 

Studio: 1406 Van Ness Avenue. 

THE GARDEN CITY SANITARIUM 

Thoroughly Equipped with all modern appliances for the relief 
of suffering humanity, all forms Water Treatment, the finest 
Static Galvanic Sinusoidal and Faradic Electrical apparatus, A 
Corps of well trained nurses of boih sexes, skilled in all forms of 
treatments and manipulations, Rest Cure scientifically carried out. 
The Purest and best of koods manufactured and for sale. * * A 
quiet, home-like place, beautiful scenery, Mount Hamilton and the 
famous Lick Observatory in plain view; one blocs from electric 
cars, fifteen minutes walk from the center of the city. Terms $10 lo 
$20 per week, including medical attention and regular treatment. 
Garden City Sanitarium* East San Jose, Cal. 

Should use Damlana Bitten. 

the great Mexican remedy; 
It (rives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street Sao Franolseo. Send lor circular. 



Weak Men and Women 



August 4. 1900 



SAN FKA.NC1K) (J NEWS LETTER. 



17 



5unnER Resorts 

Thr Vrw. I.rnrn d*. ^tuMhlir.l at it* oMo*. No. '•'•* Kr«rny -trrcl. * 
icLUMc Hureau <>f Information where tnjnnc •ecklng ltif<>rm«i(nn. rvul«ft 
■ ( tf*^ r], attraction*, prl, • - •■( entertainment, and all other facta that in 
r l*> * choice of a Summer Roaort mar bo obtained Kl 



RUBICON SODA SPRINGS. 

The waters of these springs possess marvelous 
curative properties, especially effective in thecure 
of stomach, liver and kidney disorders, and are 
an absolute specific for rheumatic gout, nervous 
dyspepsia, and catarrh. 

Situated in the romantic Rubicon Valley, ten 
miles west of Lake Tahoe. 

Stage daily, connecting with steamer at Mc- 
Kinney's. Rates, $2.00 per day, $12.00 per week. 
Table second to none. Altitude. 6000 feet. 



Now Open 



D. ABBOTT, Proprietor. 



THE TALLAC 



Lake Tahoe, Cal. 



Open for the season from May 15th. Give 
yonr family an entire cbaDge of climate. No 
more staging; railroad from Truckee to 
Tahoe. Dr. Pottenger, resident physician. 
For information, inquire of Traveler Bureau, 
20 Montgomery street, or address 

M. LAWRENCE Z> GO. ... - 



Tallac. 



Lake county 



ANDERSON SPRINGS 

Only natural Mineral 
Steam Baths in . . 
Hot Sulphur and Iron Baths. 
Board : $8 to $14 per week. 
Baths free. Address, 

J. Anderson, Anderson Springs, Middle- 
town, Lake County, Cal. 

Fare, San Francisco to Springs and return 
reduced to $8. Send for circular. 

JW" Full particulars at 8. F. News Letter, 6% Kearny St., S. F. 

HOTEL BENVENUE and COTTAGES 

Lakeport, Gal, 

Lakepobt's Sdmmeb Resoet. Situated overlooking the shore on 
Clear Lake. New Pavilion, boathouse, and bowling alley. Open all 
the year. Special facilities for accommodating families with child- 
ren; home cooking; boating, bathing, hunting, and superior tishing. 
Lovely drives and walks. Rates, $7 per week. 

PRANK & A. M. SCALES, Proprietors. 

SKAGGS' HOT SPRINGS, 

SONOMA COUNTY, only 4% hours from San Fran- 
cisco and but 9 miles' staging: waters noted for medicinal virtues; beat 
natural bath in the State; grand mountain scenery; good trout streams at 
door: photograph ers' room, telephone, telegraph, daily mail: first-class 
hotel and stage service ; morning and afternoon stages. Round trip from 
San Franoisc6 only 85.50. Take Tiburon ferry at 7:30 a. m. or 3:30 p. m. 
Terms, $2 per day or 812 per week. References: Any guest of the past five 
years. Patronace constantly lnereasing. _ _ 

J. F. MTJLGREW. Proprietor. 

TAMALPAIS VILLA 

Kent. Station, Ross Ualley, Marin Go, 

A popular summer resort, 45 minutes from the city ; salt water 
bathing, boating, fishing, etc. Terms reasonable; reduction to fam- 
ilies. For particulars, address . , 

Mes. E. Patterson, Proprietress. 
Take Sausalito Ferry. 



LAUREL DELL LAKE 



Lake County 



The m.'st attractive |ii;ice in Lake County 
to spend your vacation. Bnalinir, bathing, 
bowling, tennis, livery, new walks, etc. 
Write for circular. 

H. WAMBOLD, 
Laurel Dell, Lake County, Cal. 

HOBERG'S RESORT 

Pleasantly located in a pine forest three thousand live 
hundred feet altitude; highest elevation, lowest price. 
First-class family table and pleasant rooms, seven to 
eight dollars per week ; surrounding scenery unsurpassed 
by any springs in the immediate vicinity. Stage daily. 
Buy ticket direct for Hoberg's, Lake county, Cal. 

George Kammerer and Mrs. M. Hoberg, Proprietors. 

It is just lovely now at 

NAPA SODA SPRINGS 

No fogs; warm and bright. Swimming pool. 
Soda water baths. 

HOTEL VENDOME, San Jose. 

One of California's most attractive resoits. The 
starting point for Lick Observatory. The center of an 
orchard section of unparalleled beauty, through which 
finely graded and watered roads, for cycling and driv- 
ing, lead in every direction. The most thoroughly- 
kept and up-to-date hotel in Central'California 

For further information call at Traveler office, 20 
Montgomery street, San" Francisco, Cal., or address 



If 

You 
Knew 



What a delightful time you could have at Hotel 
del Coronado, How near the mercury hovers 
around the 70 deg. mark day and night, week af- 
ter week, How many tish are wanting to be caught, 
And the pretty girls and beaux, with games, dan- 
cing, concerts, etc., you would come at once. 

Address, E. S. Baecock, Manager, 

Coronado Beach, Cal. 



THE CELEBRATED SISSON TAVERN 

Now open. Situated at the foot of Mt. Shasta, half a mile from 
the station. Free bass meeti trains. Altitude 3500 feet. Fresh 
cream and dairy produce. Climate unsurpassed; average heat, 80 
degrees. Any one wishing to spend an outing in the mountains 
will find this a most desirable place. No poison oak. For further 
information, addre's Mes. L. M. Sisson. 

THE THOUSAND ISLAND HOUSE 

Thousand Islands, Alexan- 
dria Bay, NEW YORK 

The Thousand Island 
House is without doubt the 
most desirable and delight- 
ful summer lesort in the 
country. A thoroug h 1 y 
modern and up - to - date 
house equipped with a 
large number of publio and 
private baths, and lighted 
throughout with eleotrio- 
ity. The region in which 
this hotel stands is one of 
those places nature seems 
to have created for the sole 
pleasure of man. The 
beautiful St. Lawrence Kiver, with its current ever flowing to the sea, its 
more than "1000 island*," some large, some small, Nowhere In the oountry 
can fishing and boating be so thoroughly enjoyed. For fuller information 
fend two 2-cent stamps for illustrated booklet and rates, to O. G. Staples, 
Riggs House, Washington, D. 0., or Alexandria Bay, N..Y. 



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i8 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900. 




ftLTHOU6H the opening of the schools this week has 
brought back many from the mountains, from the sea 
shore, and from the summer resorts, it does not by any 
means follow that there will be an immediate resumption 
of social duties in town. 

The month of August is always the month of the year at 
Del Monte, and this year it is the Mecca towards which 
all society is now turning its footsteps. Already the 
crowd is not only large but quite excited over the multi- 
tude of attractions which will open there next week, and 
Saturday next will assuredly see such a gathering of 
society at Del Monte as has not been witnessed for sev- 
eral years. DuriDg the week of sports two days will be 
devoted to racing, and ponies will be brought from all 
over the State to contest the ownership of the Del Monte 
cup; the steeplechase course has been newly laid out, and 
the horses are to be ridden by their owners. Golf and 
tennis are to fill the morning hours, polo will be the at- 
traction duriDg the four afternoons of the week, and the 
different clubs of the State will be represented in the 
teams. Another feature of the week will be the oppor- 
tunity to take the sixteen-mile drive in Walter Hobart's 
coach, the ribbons over the horses to be held by such well- 
known whips, among others, as E. D. Beylard, Raoul- 
Duval, Frank Carolan and Walter Hobart." To all this 
may be added innumerable dinners, dances, luncheons, 
etc., which will go towards making what some of our 
English cousins insist the Americans term "a real tall 
time." 

Even though some of the summer visitors are departing 
from San Rafael for the week of sports at Del Monte, 
there are still enough remaining there to keep things 
lively for some time to come. The usual round of dinners 
and small dances will be varied this evening when ST 
theatrical performance is to be given at the Opera House, 
in which Miss Mary Scott (Mrs. Neville Castle), Laurence 
Griffith and Stewart Allen and others will appear in The 
Happy Pair and Home. Society will beyond doubt crowd 
the little theatre, and several parties from the city have 
been made up to take in the performance and the moon- 
light tiip on the bay which will follow. 

Our Calif jrnian women have of late years gone in en- 
thusiastically for athletics, with the result that they are 
able to hold their own with many of the sterner sex. To- 
day a new form of their prowess will be shown at Belvedere 
— which is always in the van when anything aquatic is in 
order — where a boat race with l»dy rowers will be the 
spectacle which cannot fail to attract a crowd, and the 
winners of the prizes offered may well feel proud of their 
triumph. 

Oakland has again come to the fore this week with an- 
other engagement announcement, the prospective bride 
and groom being Miss Edith Phelps and Willis H. Collins, 
with the early part of October set as the date for their 
wedding. 

Another German Baron has been captured by one of our 
Native Daughters in the person of the youngest sister of 
Mr. J. R. K. Nuttall; he and Mrs. Nuttall will leave for 
Europe early next mouth to be present at the marriage, 
which event will take place in Dresden. The Cheevers- 
Friedlander wedding will be a church ceremonial, but at 
which one it will be solemnized has not yet been decided. 

Monte Robles, the Crocker place at San Mateo, which 
last year was the scene of such a pretty and successful 
charity garden party, is again to be thrown open for a 
similar affair. The 25 th of August is the date set for the 
fete, which will be held there for the benefit of the Maria 
Kip Orphanage, by which time most of the Blingumites 
will have returned from Del Monte to take part in it as 
well as other festivities planned for that iocality about the 
same period. 



September -tth is the date selected by the California 
Club for the reception to be held in its rooms in the Asso- 
ciation Building to inaugurate the fall and winter season 
of the club, of which Mrs. Lovel White is the efficient 
president. 

This time last year we were all busily engaged prepar- 
ing to welcome home our California heroes from the wars. 
This year the city will again don feslive attire, and the 
celebration which marks the half centennial of our State 
promises to be the most perfect our Native Sons and 
Daughters have yet attempted. They have all been in- 
dustriously working for its success for many months past, 
and the present indications are that it will be one in every 
particular. Apropos of war heroes, the Presidio has been 
wearing its old-time war appearance with troops passing 
through en route to the Orient encamped thereabout. 
The resident officers have been entertaining their old 
friends and brother officers; dinners and dances have been 
numerous, and the reception given by Dr. Girard in honor 
of his medical brethren was a particularly pleasant gath- 
ering. 

There will be great doings at Monterey for a whole 
week, commencing Monday, August 13th, under the aus- 
pices of the Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing Associa- 
tion, and all who wish to make racing entries should com- 
municate as early as possible with Mr. R. M. Tobin, Uni- 
versity Club. Here is a brief forecast of the programme: 
On Monday, August 13th, golf will reign, and the ladies 
will play eighteen holes to qualify for the Henry T. Scott 
Cup. On Tuesday the final match play for the cup will 
come off. On Wednesday the men start for the Del Monte 
Cup, the sixteen fortunates being eligible for the final 
competition on Thursday and Friday. There will be big 
polo on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, and 
pony racing and steeple-chasing on Friday and Saturday. 
Also on Saturday there will be baseball: Burlingame vs. 
Alumni of Universities. 

The press of Portland is strong in its praise of the 
dramatic talent displayed by Miss George Elliot, daughter 

A Skin of Beauty Is a Joy Forever. 



D 




R. T. FELIX OOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Bash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure i t is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton(a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour- 
aud's ( 'roam' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all druggists and Fanoy-aroods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
und Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street, N. Y. 



Western Mutual Investment Go. Tel - Maln 1682 

$2 Per Month 
415-116 Safe Deposit Building, Montgomery and California wtreets. San 
Franeiaco. Aeei>t« u iuur>il 

THE CHAMPAGNES OF 

Moet& 
Cfrctrtdon 

White Seal and Brut Imperia 

now being marketed are of the celebrated vintage of lsOs. 

Messieurs. Moet it Chundon are the most extensive vineyard pro- 
prietors in the world and their Champagnes are having a larger sale 
and are of a quality far superior to any other brand, being used al- 
most exclusively at all ultra-fashionable functions, among others at 
the Admiral Dewey Collation, Vanderbilt, Astor, Bradley-Martin, 
Belmont, and Stuyvesant Fish affairs.— New York Wine Circular. 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO.. 
Paotfla Const Agents. 320 Market street«S. F. 



August 4. 1900. 



SAN ri;\' » NEWS 1 ; (Tilt. 



'9 



.ir'.os B. Klliot. the well known mining socro' , 
Ihls city. Miss Elliot is now taking the title role in .S 
an expurgated versiou of which is now one of the chief at- 
tractions in the repertoire rf the company in which she is 
now leading lady. Miss Elliot, judging from the reports 
which come from abroad, com sined with the opinions of 
those who have had the pleasure of seeing brr act at home, 
bids fair to reach the highest point of ambition in her 
chosen profession. 

Speaker David B. Henderson of the National House of 
Representatives and party, consisting of Mrs. Henderson, 
Miss Belle Henderson. Mr." Don A. Henderson, U. S. Judge, 
Smith McPherson, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Fox, Mrs. John 
Koster and Miss Calla Koster, spent last week at Hotel 
del Coronado. Lieutenant-Commander Nicholson of the 
torpedo boat Farragut and bride are also there. 

Hother Wismer has returned from his vacation at Lake 
Tahoe and Glen Alpine Springs. 

Mrs. F. F. Low and her daughter, Miss Flora, have 
been occupying their city residence this week. 

The many friends here of Major R. Dickins, of the 
United States Marine Corps, were delighted to see him 
again the other day, even if only to wish him bon 
royage and a safe return to his native shores. He arrived 
here on Saturday last in command of five hundred marines 
en route for Peking with the allied troops, via Taku. Major 
Dickins has thus the distinction of being in command of 
the first body of marines which has ever left the United 
States for active service detached and independent of 
some ship of war. The last time this gallant officer en- 
tered Peking was during his lieutenancy, as Aid-de-Camp 
to General Grant. Since then he has seen much service 
on the China coast before joining the battle-ship Oregon, 
on which he was Captain of Marines during the late fuss 
with Spain, when this splendid vessel made her record trip 
around the Horn. His promotion to the rank of Major 
was the reward of distinguished service in the field during 
that campaign. Quiet and unassuming in manner, with a 
kindly word for all who come in contact with him, Major 
Dickins won a host of friends here, and he leaves for the 
new scene of action with the best wishes of all who know 
him for a safe return, crowned with laurels of victory. 
Young Captain Dutton, in command of Company B under 
Major Dickins, is a son of W. J. Dutton, the well-known 
insurance man of this city. 

On the memorable occasion of the declaration of 

war by France in 1780, the staff officer who had received 
the telegram from Ems galloped wildly with the news to 
the house of Count Moltke, and, dismounting, rushed ex- 
citedly into the study of the general-in-chief. Moltke firs,t 
offered him a cigar, then opened a drawer in his writing 
desk and took therefrom a neatly arranged bundle 1 f 
official letters and telegrams, remarking, as he handed 
them to the adjutant, "Take these to the military tele- 
graph office and have them despatched 1 " This simple 
act put the vast machinery of the German War Office in 
motion, so that the entire army was mobilized some days 
before the French realized their hopeless unpreparedness. 



THE NICKEL PLATE KOAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. K. E.) oflers 
Eastern passengers three elegantly appointed vestibuled express 
trains daily between Chicago and New York and Chicago and Boston. 
For sleeping car reservations and full information address Jay- W. 
Adams, Pac. Coast Pass. Agt., 37 Crocker Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



Under the new management of John P. Heinkelthe Maison Kiche 
is prospering handsomely and the good livers know where to go for 
a finely cooked and perfectly served meal, such as one gets in tbe 
best restaurants of Paris. The wines are the best brands in the 
world's market and the excellent viands and service together with 
the moderate prices conspire to make this restaurant one of the 
best in America. 

Gas Consumers' Association, 316 Post street. Reduces gas bills 
from twenty to forty per cent. Electric and gas meters tested. 

Aller's Press Clipping Bureau. 610 Montgomery street, San Franoisco, 
deals In all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political 
from press of State, eo ast and oountryTel. Main 10 42. 

Soothfield Wellington Coal 
order from any coal dealer. 



Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing: Syrup ' 
children while teethlnir. 



The cleaning 

of carpets 

without taking them up. 
That is a specialty with 
Pearline. After a 
thorough su eeping, you 
simply scrub them with 
Pearline and watc 
I hen you wipe then: 
off with clean watc, 
and sit down an i 
enjoy their newness and freshness. You ought 
to be able to do a <;ood deal ot sitting down, if 
in all your washing and cleaning you use 
Pearline. Use it alone — no soap with it. *si 



Amateur Sports 




To be held at the 



MOTEL DEL MONTE 
Aug. 13th to 20th, 1900 



Golf, Races, Polo 



For Special Cups and Purses 



G. W. McKEAND. 

Searcher of Records 

and Examiner of Titles 
to Lands in Alameda County 

Olfices : 458 Eighth St., West of Broadway, OAKLAND. 




FARMYARD IN SUSSEX. Size, 20x15 Inches. 

Copy of one of the premiums given for the return of 25 

QUEEN LILY SOAP wrappers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900. 




THE DEAD CHILD.— ernest dowson, in decorations. 

Sleep on, dear, now, 

The last sleep and the best, 
And on thy brow, 

And on thy quiet breast, 
Violets I. throw. 
Thy scanty years 

Were mine a little while; 
Life bad no fears 

To trouble thy brief smile 
With toil or tears. 
Lie still, and be 

For evermore a child 1 
Not grudgingly, 

Whom life has not defiled, 
I render thee. 
Slumber so deep, 

No man would rashly wake; 
I hardly weep, 

Fain only, for thy sake. 
To share thy sleep. 
Yes, to be dead. 

Dead, here with thee to-day,— 
When all is said 

'Twere good by thee to lay 
My weary head. 
The very best! 

Ah, child so tired of play, 
I stand confessed ; 

I want to come thy way, 
And share thy rest. 



BANKING 



A FAMILIAR STORY.— tom masson, in the smartset- 

We tied our barques, in the misty past, 

Together, and sailed away 
On the tide of youth that was flowing fast 

To the Island of Happy Day. 
And we tarried there till the sea-god lured 

Us over the sea to him, 
And we sailed through shoals till our barques were moored 

In the Sea of the Social Swim. 

We tossed and fretted, and ne'er conten', 

Again our sails were set. 
And we skimmed along through the fog, and went, 

Aground in the Straits of Debt. 
On the shore of the Land Regret we stand 

As the stately ships go by. 
But no one answers the beckoning hand. 

And vain is our helpless cry. 

In the light of the sun that is setting fast 

On the wreck of our social sin, 
As a dream we see, through the misty past, 

The Land of the Might-Have-Been. 



IMMORTAL.— MARGARET f- SANOSTEft, IN HARPER'S BAZAR, JULY 14. 

Once we have loved we never lose. 

That is not love which can forget, 
Through loss and loneliness and grief 

This gem is as its coronet. 

That true love never can forget. 

That is not faith which drops its hold. 

Once we have trusted, in our clasp 
Forever lies life's changeless gold, 

Nor withers in our loosened grasp; 

True faith through all time keeps its clasp. 

MY FRIEND —marqaret e. sanoster, in harper's bazar. 

Hunger that ached and famine that craved ; 
Courage the face of the foe that braved; 
Sorrow that fainted, and shame that blushed ; 
Silence the bitter complaint that hushed— 
What do they matter? The world goes by. 
We still have each other, ray friend and I. 
We yet have each other, on sea or shore. 
Can mortal desire a joy the more? 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, 82,000.000 Surplus, $1,000,000 

Profit and Loss Account, January 1. 1900, $2,321,212 

WILLIAM ALVORD President! CHARLES R. BISHOP, Vice-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Aas't Cashier | I. F. MOULTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; Union National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs. 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris — Messrs. de Rothschild Preres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto Qesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALLFORNIA STREET. S. F. 

Deposits July 1. 1900. •26,952.875 Reserve Fund $218,593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 439,608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen. Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansome and Sctter Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KJNG, Manager F. L. LTPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus 16.250.000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly. Cashier; Portland. Or.. R. M. Dooly. Cashier. 

DLRECTORS-^John J. Valentine. Andrew Cbrlsteson. Oliver Eldrldge. 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermlngham. Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan, President 8. G. Mubphy, Vice-President 

George A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper. Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson. Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper. Jamei 
Moffltt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy. Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo &. Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALLFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,238,372.45 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000.000 00 

Deposits June 30. 1900 .28,938.895.12 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier. A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary. A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Rubs, N. Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and L N. 
Walter, 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALLFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital..$10,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..$210,000 
Paid-in-Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent, interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing interest at the rate of 6 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Wm, Corbin. Secretary and General Manager 



Crocker- Wool worth National 



Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Cobneb Market, Montgomeby and Post Sts. 

Paid- up-Capital $1,000,000 

Wm. H. Cbockeb, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

W. E. Brown, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr.. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E Brown, a E. Green. G. W. 
Kline. Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Scott . 



August 4, 1900. 



SAN PR \N. IKR. 




beams 



— 



ITOLI5 FROM THIETES. 

— "WnAT does this nation need?" shouted the impas- 
sioned orator. "What does this nation require, if she 
steDs proudly across the Pacific — if she strides boldly 
across the mighty ocean in her march of trade and free- 
dom? I repeat, what does she need?" "Rubber boots," 
suggested the grossly materialistic person in a rear seat. 

— "What is vour object in dwelling so persistently on 
abstruse philosophic topics?" "Well," answered the man 
with a very gentle but unprosperous look, "I suppose it's 
because it 's one of the few places where I can dwell with- 
out paying rent." 

— Dick — You toid me yesterday that you had proposed 
to Miss Coupon by mail. Did you get any letter in reply? 
Henrt— Yes, I got two letters. Dick— Then it is all set- 
tled? Harry — Yes, it is all settled. The letters were 
"n" and "o." 

— Mrs. Podmore— I think you had better go for the 
doctor, George. Johnny complains of pains in his head. 
Podmore — It's DOthiDg serious; he has had them before. 
Mrs. Podmore — Yes; but never on a half-holiday. 

— Advertising Clerk — Your advertisement begins, 
"Wanted— A Silent Partner." Patron— Yes, that's it. 
Clerk — Do you wish it placed under "Business Oppor- 
tunities" or "Matrimonial?" 

— "Are the McNabbers neighborly?" "Neighborly? 
Gracious! They borrowed our lawn mower over a week 
ago, and they've sent for me three times to come over and 
see why it wouldn't cut." 

The Book Agent — I would like to show you this beauti- 
ful work. It tells about the habits of savage animals. 
The Severe Lady at the Door — I don't need it. I have 
been married four times. 

— Clementine — Emeline, Mrs. Booker-Brown told me 
she called on you before she heard you were intellectual. 
Emeline— She did? Well, I'll protect myself by not re- 
turning the visit. 

— "And why," continued the teacher, "should we al- 
ways hold the aged in respect?" "'Cause it's generally 
the old men that has all the money," Bobbie replied. 

— The Caller — So your canary's name is Joe, is it? 
Does that stand for Joseph, or Josephine? Small Girl — 
We — we don't know. That'a why we call it Joe. 

— "Pa, will ' teeney-weeny' rhyme with ' eeny-meeny?' 
"Stop it, my boyl Stop it instanterl We don't want any 
Alfred Austins in this happy family." 

— "Are you fond of archaeology, madam?" "Oh, very 
much, professor. But I don't care for any now, for I'm 
not hungry I" 

The improved machinery anil the expert workmen employed by 
the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, have 
done away with the horrors of carpet cleaning. Many persons put 
up with dirty carpets just because they dread the process of renova- 
tion and cleaning. At the Spaulding establishment the work is done 
with dispatch and thoroughness, and old soiled and dusty carpets 
are made to look like new. 



" This beats Paris I" exclaimed a globe-trotter the other night 
when for the first time he was entertained at the Cafe Zinkand. 
After the play is over everybody goes to Zinkand's to get the best of 
wines, beers and sappers and to listen to the inimitable music. 



Many people are returning to the city after sojourning at the 
various resorts along the line of the California Northwestern Kail- 
way, so that now there is plenty of room for those who failed to find 
accommodations earlier in the season. 

Humboldt Savings X Loan Society 

No. 18 Geary Street 
Directors: Adolph C.Weber. President: W. J. Lowry, Vice-President: 
Ernest Brand, Seoretary: W. S. Keyes: I. Kohn; G. H. Luchsineer; A. D. 
Keyes and C. E. Hatch, Attorneys. 



BANKIMG 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limitfd 

Authorised Capital. te.fmn.nrm. r»pU»l Sub*crib*d and Fully Paid. fettOjOOO 

HKAF> OFPICR— 71 Lombard -Iroet, liondon. 

PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber ol Commerce Building. 

TACOMA HKAXCIt --13M PaHAo Arenue. 

Banker*- Bank ol England. London Joint Stock Bank. I milted. 

Agent* and Correspondent!*: N«w York— .T. I*. Morgan ft. Co. : OHl fcOO 
Union National Batik. 

Till* hank I* prepared to grant letters ol credit available In any part ol the 
world and to tranaact every description ol hanking and exchange bottOMl 

Wri.i.iAM bUOKIITOUi Manager. 



Bank of British Columbia 

9. K. ©or. Bush and Sausome Sts. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up. t3.000.000. Reserve Fund. 8500,000 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver. New Westminster. Kami oops. Nanl- 
amo. Nelson Rosslnnd, Sandon. British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposit** received. Commercial credits granted 
available In all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon Its 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank ol Canada; Chicago— First National Bank: 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico— London Bank of Mexico: South 
America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan— 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demeraba and Trinidad (West Indies) — Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to Issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sanhome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital J2.60O.0O0 Paid-Dp Capital. 12.000.000 

Reserve Fund. 9925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Tbreadncedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N.Y.: Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle, 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

S1G. GREENEBATJM O. ALTSCHTJL, Managers. 

B. ALTSCHTJL, Cashier. 



The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts.. San Franoisao 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS-- James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce JohnBon. Geo. 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, John Barton. O. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel &Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. LouIb 
— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co, 

Germania Trust Company of San Franc co 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. $1,000,000 Paid-TJp Capital and Reserve. 8375.000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, Arms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors — Ernst A. Denlcke. F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarhoro. F. C. Slebe, Albert G. Wleland. H. P. Sonntag. John Rapp, H 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denlcke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-President : H. 
Bnmner. Cashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pink and Sansome Stb. 

Head Office— 18 AuBtin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86,000,000 Paid Up Sl.600.0n' 

Subscribed 3,000.000 Reserve Fund... 700,00' 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

TON. STETNHART. P. N. LIUENTHAL. Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 



Interest paid on deposits. 



William Alvord 
William Baboock 
Adam Grant 



Loans made, 
directors. 

S. L, Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. 8. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. McCutchen 
R. H. Pease 



AN I TA'S 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 
STRATEGY. 



By G. G. GROW. 



JACK WELLS jogged slowly along 
the naked, sweeping plain in the 
direction of the little Pinoche; his 
horse took that peculiar vaquero gait, 
little more than a walk and not quite 
a trot, by means of which many miles 
can be done in a day with but little 
fatigue to horse or rider. 

It was in the fall of the year and he 
was on his way to the great rodeo, or 
round up of the cattle, where the 
stock men assembled to brand the 
young calves before they were again 
turned out to graze. Jack's fancy 
was filled with a pleasing expectancy 
as he thought of the rodeo, with its 
scores of vaqueros and the mad riding 
in the midst of a thousand bellowing 
cattle. He gazed with almost boyish 
pride at his reata, or rope, which one 
of the Spaniards had made him. For 
his frank face and free purse had 
proved an open sesame to the hearts 
in this new country as it had done at 
home — that far away home in B)ston 
where his people had grieved sadly 
when he failed to get his degree. 
Jack had then persuaded his father, 
a prominent attorney, into letting 
him cut it all and go west for a year. 
He had found western life much to his 
liking but confessed to himself a sec re t 
surprise at seeing the home of 
bachelor Uncle Jim a low rambling 
adobe house thoroughly Spanish in 
every way. The entrance led into a 
roomy hall which was hung with deer 
and bear skins; all sorts of firearm? 
were stacked in the corners and a 
huge fireplace extended the full end 
of it. 

As they sat at table Anita, the 
pretty handmaid, deftly served them 
to frijoles which the mid re had pre- 



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the golf ---^_^— 
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the of- ^^ 
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every occasion, the 

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.11 «iih eii.-lt auMnendi ■- 

.1 I., ii 1 1 ik'akTH. or .lln-ct 

i.»i .... rwHliiulri. H oi'iita. 

I.: i.ntc hpofck't— 






Win. 




X C. i. EDGiltTUS HF(1. 0).. Bos -tl Mlirley, M.MSS. 



pared with chiles and a superabund- 
ance of bacon, the proper digestion of 
which was brought about only by liv- 
ing in the saddle. Altogether life 
was spiced with a true game flavor. 
Jack found it not half bad to sit idly 
on the broad veranda after a long 
day's run and if the pretty senorita 
passed — as she often did — to catch at 
the dimpled arm and see her languor- 
ous eyes sparkle into animation as 
she playfully eluded his clasp. 

But Ramone, the black-eyed, 
swarthy cheeked major-domo did not 
like to see the gringo at sport with 
Anita. He felt that until this man 
came to the ranch, she had not re- 
garded him unwillingly. The madre 
too had hinted to Anita that Ramone 
had horses and cattle in plenty. But 
the girl did not admire his swarthy 
skm and her glance lingered lovingly 
oo the fair hair and soft hands of the 
young Senor. 

Ramone's jealousy at last became 
so fierce at Anita's evident preference 
for the gringo th.it he had sworn to 
"lass" the coyote and drag him from 
one end of the vega to the other. 
This, however, in an hour when be 
had been drinking heavily and a hot 
jealousy filled him, for he had been re- 
pulsed by Anita in an attempted 
caress before not unwillingly granted, 
and the girl quickly divined that 
Rimone waited only the opportunity 
to harm the man she loved. This 
thought brought a look of anxiety to 
her usually impissive face so that 
Jack coming in contact with the 
lithesome figure as he rounded a 
corner of the porch had exclaimed as 
he carelessly slipped his arm about 
her waist: 

"What makes you look so sad, 
cara-miu.'" 

"Why do you laugh, Sefior. Ramone 
hates you and will harm you if he 
can." 

His reply was to imprint a series 
of kisses upon the lips of his com- 
paiiera. For it is as natural for most 
young fellows of twenty to make a bit 
of idle love to a pretty face near by, 
as for summer to follow fast on the 
heels of spring. 

Jack paid no heed to her warning 
and continued to pace the porch, 
Anita's hand in his, while an occa- 
sional glance from her dark eyes was 
sufficient to put an end to his Spanish 
love song and follow the tempting in- 
clination which the red lips at his side 
seemed to prompt. Then, pausing, 
he said: 

"I must leave you to-morrow for 
the great rodeo at the little Pinoche. 
There'll be great fun and I'll ride so 
hard and throw so straight that even 
Rimone will forget to hate me, for 
you Spanish love a good viguero. Is 
it not so, Anita?" 

"Yes, Senor, but I love your life 
better and I fear the major-domo. 
Ah I the madre calls me, I must go. 
O Blessed Mother! It is hard to say 
adios," and, flinging her soft arms 



August 4, 1900. 

' I V HE plague of lamps is 
the breaking of chim- 
neys ; but that can be avoided. 
Get Macbeth's "pearl top" 
or " pearl glass." 

The funnel-shaped tops are 
beaded or " pearled " — a 
trade-mark. Cylinder tops 
are etched in the glass — 

"MACBETH PEARL GLASS " 

another trade-mark. 

Our " Index " describes all lamps and their 
proper chimneys. With it you can always order 
the right size and shape of chimney for any lamp. 
We mail it FKF.E to any one who writes for it. 



Address 



Macbeth, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



about his neck, she wept hot tears 
with such a fierce abandon that it 
gave the young fellow pause. And 
yet he had seen sufficient of Spanish 
nature to know that they feel keenly 
for the moment and that but a short 
absence alone suffices to efface a 
memory and replace it with a more 
substantial reality. 

With this thought he gave himself 
up to the not unpleasing task of 
soothing her fears. As the gentle 
breeze wafted her dark hair to his 
face and her supple figure swayed to- 
ward him it was with a consciousness 
of right doing that he gently pushed 
her from him. The madre 's voice was 
again heard calling in impatient tones. 
As she went towards the kitchen 
Jack pulled himself together and de- 
cided it was a very good thing he was 
going away for a while. 

The next morning found him, as we 
first saw him, jogging along a dusty 
sweep of country, stopping to refresh 
himself and horse at the Articulito, a 
little creek running part way across 
the country. Pleasing thoughts of 
the rodeo filled his mind as he threw 
himself down by the stream for a 
brief respite. Then on again until a 
partially broadening plateau an- 
nounced that the journey was nearly 
over. 

The following morning a startling 
transformation had taken place in the 
surrounding country. Where all be- 
fore had been silent and lonely, every 
thing was now a scene of the gayest 
life and activity. The air was filled 
with the bellowing of thousands of 
cattle and the young calves kept up a 
constant bawling when in the mad 
scurry they were separated from the 
mother. Picturesque vaqueros were 
careening about on their restive 
horses, who shared the excitement of 



THIS AUTOGRAPH IS NEVER ON 

A POOR SHADE-ROLLER 

ANO NFVFR AQ'SEN 

FROM AGOOD 

ONE. 



4*^ 

GET 
THEGENUINE 



)HARTSHORN 



August 4, iqoo. 



S\\ I MWS LKTTF.ll. 



M 



the hour and were anxious for the 
real business of the day to begin. Tot 
they, like their riders, were gayly 
caparisoned: silver mountings shone 
and glinted in the sunlight. On such 
gala days as this, Ibt - rode 

their best reined and most high- 
spirited horses. The Spaniard prides 
himself on his prowess in the field, 
and in spite of a native indolence in 
other directions, is an active fearless 
horseman and rides with a character- 
istic grace. 

The rodo was at its height and the 
spirits of the riders were enlivened by 
drinking far more whiskey— a neces- 
sary adjunct of the true rojeo — than 
was good for them. Ramone, whose 
business it was to superintend his men 
as they "lassed" and separated the 
calves, had offered several affronts to 
the gringo, but Jack had let them pass 
unnoticed. As the day advanced the 
Spaniard was still more reckless and 
as he dashed past he gave Jack's 
horse a cut across the head with his 
rope, almost dismounting the latter, 
who called after him: 

"Caramba! you fool, no more of 
that!" This raised a laugh amongst 
those near enough to hear. The ridi- 
cule enraged the major-domo. He 
gathered together his reata and took 
straight aim at Jack's head. Then, 
throwing his horse upon its haunches, 
he was just making a sure turu around 
the horn of the saddle when the reata 
snapped iu two! There was a mur- 
mur of surprise at this unprecedented 
occurrence in vaquero history. 

In a second Jack's hand was in his 
pocket and a quick succession of shots 
followed. Ramone swayed, struggled 



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about the wonderful 

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Butlers in best families and all first class 
cooks can tell you that soups, fish, meats, 
gravy, game.salads and many oilier dishes 
are given an apposing relish if flavored 
with Lea & Pemns' sauce. 



for an instant and fell to the ground; 
everyone's attention was now directed 
toward the two men— then all went 
to succor the maj ir-domo while Jack's 
uncle rode rapidly toward him and 
exclaimed: 

" You are in the right, my boy, but 
you've played the deuce, and though 
for the time being have the admira- 
tion of these men, remember they are 
unstable as water and if Ramone dies 
will dog j'our steps for revenge. Get 
home as fast as you can, take fresh 
horses and do not stop until you are 
out of their reach. Go." 

Jack hesitated a moment. He did 
not like this part he had to play: it 
savored of cowardice and the young 
fellow's blood was up. But a few 
fierce looks from the swarthy visages 
about, showed him what folly remain- 
ing would be. so dashing the spurs in- 
to the sides of his horse he was soon 
out of sight. 

When he reached the ranch house 
Anita rushed toward him — her face 
pale and full of emotion: 

" Gracios Dios! You are safe. I 
cut the inside strands of Ramone's 
reata so he would not kill you. You 
laughed when I told you the black 
devil would lass you and drag you." 

Fifteen minutes after his arrival 
Jack was again in the saddle; stoop- 
ing down he clasped Anita abjut the 
neck and gave her a kiss, then drew 
back as if to goon. But she went to- 
ward him with outstretched arms, her 
soft voice quivering with emotion as 
she said: "The Blessed Lady be with 
you." 

And the last western picture Jack 
carried away was of Anita's slender 
figure silhouetted against the vivid 

blue sky. 

* * * * * 

It is evening in a far away western 
town and a coarse looking Spanish 
woman, surrounded by half a dozen 
children, is making tamales, while her 
husband, a man with a deep scar 
across his cheek is saying: "Anita, 
why do you make the tamales to-day?" 

— Wandering Willie (telling the 
story)— Den de mayor called out de 
fire department an' ordered de hose 

turned on de frantic mob Weary 

Johnson— Bat's cruelty, why couldn't 
dey try shootin' first? 

—Possible Renter (from the city, 
examining suburban cottage) — Is the 
cellar a dry one? Mr. Isolate (of 
Lonelyville, evasively)— W-ell, there 
may be a couple of bottles of beer in 
itl 



WHAT THE KAISER 
CAN DO. 



IN an illustrated character sketch 
of the German emperor we are told 
that he has written a public prayer 
and conducted a choir. He can cook 
as well as he can eat. He can play 
chess, paint pictures, or draw carica- 
tures. He has learned engineering 
and studied electricity. Though he 
can only use one arm he can shoot 
game for four hours at the rate of 
two a minute. He has over a hundred 
titles, and is an admiral in three of 
the biggest navies. In 25 years he 
has shot 23.000 head of game. He 
changes his dress a dozen times a day, 
has a dozen valets, and a wardrobe 
worth t500,0C0. He works every day 
from five a. m. to seven p. m. He 
can write a song as well as sing it", 
can manage a yacht as well as he can 
ride a horse. He can conduct a reli- 
gious service as well as a bishop. He 
can command a fleet as well as an 
army, a ship as well as a regiment. 

He is king, emperor, author, musi- 
cian, dramatist, traveler, choir-con- 
ductor, sportsman, singer, and there 
is nothing, from rocking a cradle to 
ruling an empire, of which he is not a 
master. He is the royal Jack-of-all- 
trades, with the pride of an emperor 
and the power of a Caesar. He is 
the modern William the Conqueror. 
Before he had been on the throne two 
years, he had dismissed the foremost 
statesman on the continent of Europe. 
Bismarck had received a politician to 
whom the kaiser objected, and the 
kaiser informed the chancellor that 
he must know whom his ministers re- 
ceived. "Tell his majesty that I can- 
not allow anyone to decide who is to 
cross my threshold," said Bismarck 
bluntly to the royal messenger, and 
the next day he repeated the message 
to the emperor himself. "Not even 
when I as your sovereign command 
you!" shouted the young ruler in a 
rage, and the chancellor said, coldly: 
"The command of my sovereign ends 
at the drawing-room of my wife." It 
was on a Saturday, on the Tuesday 
all the world was talking of Prince 
Bismarck's resignation. That is the 
emperor's way. He can brook no 
opposition. "All who oppose me I 
will crush," he bad said, and Bismarck 
was the first to fall. 



One-fourth of what a man eats en- 
ables him to live — the other three- 
fourths enables his physician to live. 



24 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August 4, 1900. 



Southern Pacific Co. —Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market Street] 



leave] From July 15, 1900 [aeeive 

*7:0d a He'i>L-la.Sulsun, Elmira. Vacaville, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 P 
*7:00a Shasta Express— Davis. Williams (for Bartlett Springs). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland *7:45 p 

*7:30a Martinez. San Ranion. Vallejo, Napa, Calistota. Santa Rosa,.... *6:15 p 

•8:00 a Davis. Woodland. Knights Landing, Marysville, Oroville *7:45 p 

•8:00a Atlantic Express. Otden and East *11:45 A 

*8:30 A San Jose, Li vermore. Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville. 

Marysville, Chico. Red Bluff. *4:15 P 

*8:30 A Oakdale, Chinese (for Yosemite), Sonora, Carters *4 :15 p 

*9flflA Haywards, Niles. and way stations °11 :45 a 

*9:00a Los Anteles Expre a s — Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton. 

Merced and Fresno. *6:45 p 

* 9:30a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations *5:45 p 

*10:00a The Overland Limited— Otden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago *5:15 p 

*11:00a Niles, Livermore, Stockton. Sacramento, Mendota, Hnnford, 

Visalia.Porterville *4:15 P 

*12:00 m Haywards, Niles, and way stations *2:45 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers t5:00 A 

*3:00p Haywards, Niles and way stations *5:45 p 

•4:O0f Martinez, San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa. Callstota. Santa Rosa *9:15 a 

*4:00p Benicia, Winters. Sacramento, Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysville. Oroville *10:45 A 

*4:30p Niles.San Jose, and Stockton *7:15 P 

*5:00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfield, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles *9:45 a 

*5:00p Fresno Passenger — Martinez, Lathrop, Stockton, Merced, 

Berenda (Raymond for Yosemite), Fresno *12:15 p 

*5:30 p New Orleans Express — Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
geles, Deming, Et Paso, New Orleans, and East *8:45 A 

*6:00p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose *7:45 A 

{6:00 P Vallejo *12:15 P 

*6:00p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne. Omaha, Chicago *11:45 A 

*6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden. Denver. Omaha, Chicago °4:15 p 

17:00 p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations 19:55 p 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento. Marysville. Red- 
ding. Portland Puget Sound and East *8:15 A 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

I7:45a Santa Cruz Excursion for Santa Cruz & Principal Way Stations t8:05p 
*8:15a Newark, Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruz and way stations *6:20 p 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations *10:50 A 

*4:15p Newark. San JoBe. Los Qatos f8:50 A 

Q4;I5p Glenwood. Felton, s mil u Cruz. . . 08:50 a 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Feancisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00. and 11:00 
A. M.. 11:00. *2:00, J3:00. *4:00, 15:00 and HlOO P. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. m.; {12:00. *1:00 
J2KK), *3:00. 14:00. »5:00 p. M. 

TCoabt Division (Broad G au ge). (Third and Townsend s t reets ). 

t6:10A Ocean View. South San Francisco tfi:30 p 

t7KK>A San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

17-30 A Sunday Excursion for San Jose. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove 

and Principal Way Stations {8:35 P 

*9:0Oa San Jose. Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Paso RobleB, 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc. and principal way stations *4:10 p 

*10:40a San Jose and way stations *6:35 a 

*11;30a San Jose, Los Gatos and way stations *S:30 p 

t2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara. San 

Jose. Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas. Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove t!0:36 a 

t3:30p San Jose and Way Stations °7:30 p 

T4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations „ *9:45 a 

t5:00p San Jose, Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations t9:00 a 

*5:30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations t«:35 a 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations t«:00 a 

&11:45p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 

a for Morning. p for Afternoon. 'Dally. t Sundays excepted. 

{Sundays only. f> Saturdays only. 

q Saturday and Sunday. '' Sun day and Monday 

The Pacific Teansfeb Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at l p. m.. for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Tuesday. August 21, 1900 

Doetc (via Honolulu) Saturday, September 15, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Wednesday. October 10. 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu)..... Saturday. Nov. 3, 1900 

Round Teip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office. No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS. General Manager. 




SS "Alameda." Wednesday, Aug. 8, at 8 p. ru. 
S3" Australia." Wednesday. Aug 22,1900, 2 pm. 

Line to Coolgardie. Australia, and Capetown.South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BR09 CO 
Agents. .14 Montgomery St. Freight office. 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS. 
POODLE DOG Restaurant, N.E. corner Eddy and Mason streets, 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Brdn. 

BAY STATE OYSTER HOUSE A^JD GRILL ROOM, 15 Stock- 
ton street and 109 O'Parrell street. N. M Apler. proprietor. 
Tplpphone Main 5057. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval ; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 
P. P. DUNDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 314-316-318 Main St. 
Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tailers, etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 



Brush Manufacturers. 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 



California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibueon Feeet— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30.9:00. 11:00 a. m; 12:35. 3:30, 5:10. 630 P. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11 -J30 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8 :00. 930, 11:00 a. m.: 130, 330. 5:00. 6:20 P. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10,7:50.9:20.11:10 a. m.; 15:45. 3:40. 5:15 P. m. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 P.M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10.9:40, 11:10 a. m.;1:40, 3:40. 5:05, 6:25 P. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco In Effect April 15. 1900 Arrive in San Francisco 



Week days | Sundays 



Destinations 



Sundays I Week days 



7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 

730 AM 

330 pm 



8:00 AM 
9:30 am 
5:00 PM 



Novato 
Petal u ma 
Santa Rosa 



10:40 AM 
6:05 pm 
7:35 PM 



8:40 AM 

10:25 am 
6:20 pm 



Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville. Cloverdale 



1025 AM 
650 pm 



7:30 am 1 
3:30 PM 1 


8:00 AM | 


Hopland, tnriah 


1 7:35 pm 


10:25 AM 
620 PM 


7:30 AM I 
3:30 PM 1 


8:00 AM | 


Guerneville 


| 735 PM 


1025 AM 
620 PM 


7:30 AM 1 
6:10 pm 1 


8:00 AM I 
5:00 PM 1 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


| 9:15 AM 
1 6:05 PM 


8:40 AM 
620 PM 


7:30 AM I 
3:30 PM I 


8:00 am I 
5:00 pm 1 


Sebastopol 


1 10:40 am 
1 735 PM 


| 10:25 AM 
620 PM 



_ i connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Sprints and White Sulphur 
Sprints; at Fulton for Altruria: at Lytton for Lytton Sprints; at Geyserville 
for Skates' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Sprints, Hithland Sprints, Kelseyvllle. Carlsbad Sprints. Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Sprints: at Ukiah, for Vichy Sprints, Saratoga Sprints, 
Blue Lakes. laurel Del Lake. Witter Sprints, Upper Lake, Pomo. Potter 
Valley. John Day's, Riverside. Llerley's, BucknelPs, Sanhedrin Heithts, 
Hullville, Booneville, Philo. Christine Soda Sprints. Navarro, Whites- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Sprints. Mendocino City, Fort Bratt. 
Westport. Usal Willits, Laytonville, Cummtnts, Bell's Sprints. Harris, Ol- 
sen's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St.. Chronicle Buildint. 

H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manater. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass Atent. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf . San Franoisco. 

For Alaskan ports.llA. m.: Autust 4, 9. 14. 19, 24, 29. 
September 3. change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B.C. and Putet Sound Ports. 11 A. M.. Autust 4,9. 
14. 19, 24, 29, Sept. 3, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 P. M.. Autust 1. 6. 11, 16 
21, 26, 31, September 5 and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Anteles) and way porta, 9 A. m. 
August 3, 7, 11, ir>, 19. 23. 27, 31, Sept. 1 and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Dieto, stoppint only at Port Harford (San Luis Obispo). Santa 
Barbara, Port Los Anteles, Redondo, (Los Anteles) 11 a. m„ Autust 1, 
5, 9. 13, 17, 21, 25, 29. September 2. and every fourth day thereafter. 
ForMexloan ports. 10 a m., 7th of each month. 
Forfurther information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the rltht to chante steamers, salllne dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
GOODALL. PERKINS & CO.. Qen.Agts., lOM arket St.. San Francisco 

9 A. M. OVERLAND TRAIN WITH SLEEPERS 
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for Fresno and Bakersfield, and other local points, 
with sleepers for first named points. 



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ESTABLISHED </ULT 90. 1856 



Annual MHriplm. |«.00 



Vol. LXI 



NETKp E;T|r ER 

SAN FRANCISCO, AUGUST II, 1900. 




Number ft. 



Printed And published every Saturday hy the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
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offlc« aj» Second *cI«as Matter. 

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FAMES Taylor Rogers has been admitted to the bars. 



w 



HEX Chinatown ceases gambling clucks will no longer 
swim. 

IF W. W. Astor really wants a country, he can get 
Nome at his own figure. 



THE American bronco will get even with the Germans 
for bucking against American pork. 

WHEN correspondents set forth the artistic quality of 
Chinese mendacity, it is hard to believe they are not 
inspired of envy. 

THE young lady writer who professes to have discov- 
ered a real cannibal at San Jose weakens her own 
story by coming back uneaten. 

MEMBERS of the Board of Education have awakened, 
pained and surprised, to realization that there are 
some things they do not know. 

THE Russian brand of boxer seems to be little, if any, 
better than the Chinese. Yet we have made these 
ruthless slayers of women and babes our allies, and must 
perforce accept responsibility for their actions. 

ALL doubt as to the Emperor William's sanity is at 
last removed. He has made it an order that the 
court preacher's sermons shall not exceed fifteen minutes 
in length. We could do with a few Williams in this 
country. 

A PRACTICAL minded Chinaman has suggested a 
speedy and efficacious way of removing the yellow 
evil. He actually succeeded in hanging himself with the 
aid of his own queue. The practice is one which should be 
encouraged. 

THE Chicago police have set a good example by their 
firm handling of the anarchists. The man who would 
attend a meeting held to rejoice over the assassination of 
Italy's King, deserves nothing but the privilege of attend- 
ing his own funeral as speedily as possible. 

THE spectacle of the President of the Chicago Univer- 
sity, endeavoring to live on fifteen cents a day will be 
edifying, but it is hard to see how his students will bene- 
fit by the scheme. The Professor's bank account is about 
the only thing which will be fattened by this ridiculous 
experiment. 

STORIES that ex-soldiers are not allowed to work at 
the Government dock, and that there is a plot against 
them, show little but an outrageous disregard for truth. 
To turn down the soldier has never been the policy of this 
Government, and many a man draws pay for work he does 
not and cannot perform, simply because in the past he 
fought for his country. The enterprising space-writer 
should unload his stuff on the horse marines. 



THE civilian, just returned from China, who boasted to 
an interviewer that he had killed forty boxers off his 
own gun during the attack on TienTsin, ought to have 
had the decency to keep his tongue still. It may have 
been necessary to slay these men, but it is certainly not 
seemly to brag about it. No soldier would have done this 
thing. 

THE Examiner's two page expose of the nickel-in-the- 
slot machine has bad its good effect — on the saloon 
keeper and the cigar man. People who never thought of 
playing before are now dropping thousands of nickels in 
the greedy can. Why? Well, for the same reason that 
prompts a man to reach out for himself and make sure 
every time he sees a "fresh paint" sign. There is a 
sucker born every minute, and the slot machine is always 
handy. 

CAPE Nome has turned out just as everybody save 
those with something to sell to prospectors declared 
it would. It is a graveyard, not alone of hopes but in a 
literal sense. It is crowded with paupers longing for 
home, and many of whom will never get here. Yet human 
nature is so strange a thing that the vaguest rumor of 
gold awaiting on the most distant and inhospitable shore 
would start a new rush. People go crazy at the thought 
of picking up a fortune, and chase it as ineffectually as 
when younger they sought the end of the rainbow. They 
would find equal profit and less danger in staying at home 
and essaying the extraction of sunbeams from cucumbers. 

THE same San Francisco newspapers that printed the 
pictures of the original Cape Nome geld bricks are 
now printing the pictures of the idle, starving men who 
throng the streets of the phantom E! Dorado. Pretty 
soon they will forget who the tempters were and publish 
I-told-you-so editorials. 

THERE is a pretty little imbroglio in the Royal house 
of Savoy, dissensions, jealousies, hates. First we have 
Queen Pia of Portugal, with no sort of love for her 
nephew, the new King of Italy, but a strong appreciation 
of him as a debt-payer-elect. Next we have the elder 
Duchess d'Aosta, likewise unloving towards her nephew 
by marriage, yet utterly dependent on him for daily bread. 
And finally comes the young Duchess d'Aosta, she of 
Orleans, who hates everybody all round, husband included, 
and whose only solace in life lies in the childlessness of her 
beautiful rival, Helene of Montenegro, now Queen of Italy. 
Altogether a pleasant family circle to which Montenegro's 
daughter was introduced. 



^N extended explanation is needed from the managers 
of a certain free clinic at 155 New Montgomery street. 
This week an operation was to have been performed there, 
for reasons unknown, upon a young woman, name and an- 
tecedents unknown. When the subject had been given 
the requisite chloroform, or a little more, she disturbed 
the programme by being dead. Patients have been known 
to expire under the influence of an anaesthetic properly 
administered, but not often. When this has occurred, the 
doctors have not run away as they did from the clinic. 
When the coroner's men arrived they found the body, but 
nobody who knew the identity of the girl nor the history 
of the case. A friend who had accompanied her to the 
place had also disappeared. Now, what was the matter 
with the doctors? What were they scared about? The 
inference, clearly, must be that they were engaged in do- 
ing that which they had no business to do, or that they 
blundered criminally. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August ii, 1900. 



THE CHINESE MUDDLE. 

WHAT tbe end of the existing Chinese muddle is to be 
is by no means clear. It is not even certain yet that 
the foreign Ambassadors are still alive. The ugly outlook 
is that they are not permitted to freely communicate with 
their different governments. If they were alive in the 
Imperial Palace and under the protection of the Empress 
what good reason could the Chinese government have for 
placing an embargo on their messages? Documents that 
would allay all fears and put an end to the contemplated 
attack on Peking would be as beneficial to the Chinese as 
to the foreigners. If it be true that Minister Conger's 
cypher book has fallen into the hands of the enemy then 
the two messages attributed to him would be accounted 
for. But even assuming that the Ambassadors are still 
in the land of the living they must necessarily be in 
imminent peril. That they should have remained in that 
condition for the past two months says little for the com- 
bined action of the great powers. Peking is less than 
ninety miles from Tien-Tsin, and yet in all that time the 
Christian nations could not relieve their diplomatic agents 
from their terrible plight. Nothing like it has happened 
in all history. The damaged railroad and the obstructed 
Peiho River could have been opened to .traffic in much less 
time. 

The truth would appear to be that the powers cannot 
agree as to what is to be done about the dismemberment 
of China after the Ministers are relieved. That question 
ought not to have been raised at the present juncture of 
affairs. The prompt rescue of the precious lives in Peking 
ought to have been the first consideration, and nothing 
should have been permitted to interfere with it. The 
apparently impotent threats that most of the newspapers 
here, and abroad, have made on this subject have tended 
to do incalculable mischief. The question of reprisals 
would have kept. It would have been time enough to talk 
about what we meant to do, when we had come by the 
power to do it. If we are going to dismember China and 
be-head its officials, we should use a little Chinese diplo- 
macy about it, and keep our intentions to ourselves. No 
ambassadors will come safely out of China, while their 
present keepers hear talk of the frightful punishment 
that awaits them. It is a pity that the offer the Japanese 
made at the outset was Dot accepted. If it had been they 
would have had the Ministers safe weeks ago. Meanwhile, 
war is on, the end of which no man can foresee. It might 
be well to bribe a few of the Chinese officials, and get out 
of the scrape in a way that generally "works" in that 
country. 

BRYAN'S ACCEPTANCE OF THE NOMINATION. 

BRYAN'S acceptance of the Democratic Nomination 
was principally notable for the speech he made on the 
occasion against imperialism. It was the most powerful 
arraignment of the imperialism of the administration that 
has so far been delivered in this country. If Mr. Bryan 
had staked his election on that single speech he would pro- 
bably have won. He chose to needlessly force his craze 
about "the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the 
ratio of 16 to 1" into his party's platform, and thereby 
threw away his otherwise excellent chances of being 
elected President of the United States. It was an act as 
stupid as it was courageous. Many persons may be heard 
expressing admiration for the man who without regard to 
consequences stood by a principle the country had de- 
clared against. The voice of the people may not be the 
voice of God, but it is one that the leader of a party ought 
to pay attention to. However, it appears at last that 
Mr. Bryan is going to say little about silver, and make 
imperialism the paramount issue of the campaign. We 
fear he is a little late in reaching that wise conclusion, 
but that he will do his best to retrieve his early mistakes, 
is what everybody expects of so gallant a fighter. A man 
at 40 years of age ought to have time enough ahead of him 
in which to correct his youthful follies. The making of a 
45 cent dollar a legal tender for 100 cents, is, to be sure, 
a difficult craze to live down. It is so inimical to that 
confidence which is the soul of trade, as to cause thinking 
men to wonder that a Presidential candidate could be 
found to advocate it. Mr. Bryan's last speech is a far 
more statesmanlike one than that which won him his 
nomination in 1896. 



THE COMING GENERAL ELECTION IN ENGLAND. 

IT is now authoritatively announced that England's next 
general election will take place during the second week 
of October. Should the Liberals win the Government will 
be changed within a week. The voice of the people at the 
polls will be paramount, and hence they have more nearly 
a Democracy in England than we have here. Their 
electoral campaigns last no longer than three or four 
weeks, whilst ours continue over four or five months. 
Political struggles are a disturbance and a hindrance to 
business, and, like the operation of extracting a tooth, 
the sooner they are over and done with the better. The 
Liberal party in England appears to be in a bad way. It 
has no great leaders, and will not follow those it has. It 
has no policy fitted to the necessities of the times. The 
Boer war has stirred England from its center to its cir- 
cumference, and has carried all parties, except the Irish, 
with it. The row the other day during which the Radicals 
refused to follow the lead of Campbell-Bannerman is but 
symptomatic of a deep seated trouble. Even conserva- 
tives, of a thoughtful type, are regretting the pitiful con- 
dition into which the Liberal party has fallen. They 
recognize the advantage to their own party and to the 
country of a stronger opposition than the next appeal to 
the country is likely to return. The cost in blood and 
treasure of the Boer war is creating a new party opposed 
to further imperialism. Lord Rosebery and the section of 
the Liberal party with which he acts is for "a Liberal 
imperialism," which he declares to be "sane and moder- 
ate," but John Morley and the social reforming Liberals 
will have none of it, and declare that they are not able to 
distinguish one brand of imperialism from another, the 
Tory article being everv whit as good as the other. Mr. 
Morley predicts in his latest speech that the Liberal party 
will break up and that the Radicals will gather under the 
banner of socialism. Keen observers notice in all this a 
close resemblance between the present condition of our 
own Democracy, and the Radicals of England and Ireland. 
As the elections in both countries will take place at 
nearly the same time, their different attitudes will be worth 
watching. It is hardly to be expected that horses will be 
changed with running streams yet to be crossed. Besides, 
Lord Salisbury is a good weight carrier, and Chamberlain 
exhibits all the mettle and go that tbe peculiarities of the 
occasion demand. 

A JEW, AND PROUD OF IT. 

IP honesty is the best policy, Sam Alschuler ought to be 
elected Governor of Illinois. He is a candidate for that 
office. Presbyterians, Roman Catholics, Congregational- 
ists, Baptists, Buddhists and what not have each claimed 
him a fellow of their particular sect. The other day Mr. 
Alschuler wrote a letter, of which the following is part: 

I beg leave to say that I am not a member of the Presbyterian 
Church, nor am 1 a member of the Methodist Church, the Catholic 
Church, the Congregational, tbe Baptist, nor any otber of the vari- 
ous denominations orchurches (including, I believe, the whole cate- 
gory) to which various persons have, since my nomination, as- 
signed me. Some have gone so far as to insist that I am a Moham- 
medan, and the next move may be to class me with the Chinese 
Boxers. I am a member of no church organization, and come what 
will, I trust no one will be deceived in believing 1 am what I am not, 
nor that I am not what I am. The plain, simple, unvarnished facts 
aretbese: My parents are both German Jews. I was born a Jew 
and raised as such to the extent that this is ordinarily the case in 
the country. I have never had. nor have I now. nor will I probably 
ever have the disposition to recant, or change, or deny, or conceal 
either my birth or my bringing up. Above all things 1 am an Ameri- 
can, with sufficient breadth of mind, I hope, to respect all persons in 
their religious beliefs or non-beliefa. I have firm faith in the dogma 
" that all men are born free and equal" and in the wisdom of the con- 
stitutional provision that "no religious test shall be required." 

The News Letter has always contended that a man's pri- 
vate religion and public politics are in no sense legitimately 
associated. Mr. Alschuler scorns to bid for the "Chris- 
tian vote" by pretending to be what he is not. His opec 
avowal of being a Jew will not bring him the "Hebrew 
vote," because there is no such thing as the "Hebrew 
vote" in this country. The Jew votes independently for 
the best man and party as he sees them. He is perhaps 
the least bigoted of all our citizens. He commits murder 
with such infrequence that you can count the local in- 
stances on a few fingers, and you seldom find him in the 
police court; he is thrifty and enterprising and an all- 
round good citizen; and he spends his money here, where 
he makes it. 



August ii, 1900 



SAN ERANCISCO KEW8 LETTER. 



THE WOES OF BEAUTY. 
" D EAUTY, my dear madam, is a great snare," once 
\_) quoth a reverend pastor, "a grmt snare," and he 
heaved a sigh. Now the lady he addressed was behind 
the <loor when beauty was served out, so she re' 
feelingly, "My dear, sir, ugliness is a much greater si 
And hers was the bigger sigh. But Annie Laurie and the 
Examiner, not having studied the "ugly" view of the ques- 
tion, are with the man of texts, and go one bettor 
cording to A. L. it is easier for a camel to go through the 
eye of a needle than for a beautiful woman to enter the 
Kingdom of Happiness. Annie Laurie has never known 
or even beard of a beautiful woman who was happy, and 
is satisfied that her readers are in the same plight. \ 
pretty woman has her chance, albeit somewhat meagre, 
and evidently the joy of joys is to be poor, plain, and 
therefore precious. A. L. does not hesitate to bring for- 
ward names in support of her theory: Lillian Russell and 
Lily Langtry are held up to the mirror as samples of 
beauteous loveless loneliness. Yet it might surely be ar- 
gued, in common fairness, that should a plain woman 
emulate the doings of some of our notable professional 
beauties she would also secure for herself ugly loveless 
loneliness. But the person whose fate specially wrings 
poor Annie Laurie's benevolent heart is, of all women in 
the world, Lady Randolph Churchill, at present careeriDg 
round the world in a glorious state of content with her- 
self, her boy bridegroom and her lot. "I'm sorry for 
them," says Annie wistfully. Well, suppose she keeps her 
pity till it is asked for? The time may come, of course; 
the twain may live to regret their entanglement like many 
another pair of better assorted ages. But, till we are as- 
sured of their misery, it would be kind to take it for 
granted that Lady Randolph will be as fortunate as 
George Eliot, Miss Thackeray, Baroness Burdett-Coutts 
and others who have wed with similar disparity. "The 
humblest wife and grandmother in Great Britain is hap- 
pier than she is." Can you hear beautiful Lady Randolph 
laughing and muttering "grapes are sour" as she reads? 
Truth is Annie Laurie has been studying her Balzac and 
thereby muddling her mind. "II n'y a que let laides qui 
inspirent hs grandes pulsions," says Balzac. But then he 
says things with a difference. 

FOR A PARK HOSPITAL AND AMBULANCE. 

MISS Rose Tompkins, a San Francisco school teacher, 
fell in three inches of water on the beach near the 
Cliff House last Tuesday, and despite the fact that she 
was immediately picked up and given every treatment at 
hand by the crew of the Life Saving Station, she died. 
An ambulance had been telephoned for directly after the 
accident, and it arrived at the station in the comfortable 
time of forty-five minutes. The ambulance had to make 
the long trip from the Receiving Hospital, and perhaps 
was not on hand when first called for. It would be unfair 
to blame the officials of the Receiving Hospital or the 
drivers for the delay, for the distance was not their fault. 
But the case is one that lends forcible point to an argu- 
ment that has frequently been made in the News Letter; 
namely: that there ought to be an Emergency Hospital 
situated well in the center of Golden Gate Park. Such a 
hospital, supplied with trained physicians, trained at- 
tendants, and a swift-running ambulance, would be of in- 
estimable service to the people of San Francisco. Hardly 
a day passes but some accident, trivial or great, occurs 
in Golden Gate Park. Horses run away, wheels go off, 
bicycles fall down, and automobiles run riot. The "first 
aid for the injured" is not the finest aid when rendered by 
a Park policeman; and it takes almost as long to get the 
Receiving Hospital ambulance to the Park as to the 
beach. 

Golden Gate Park is San Francisco's playground, and 
the one perfectly beautiful spot that we can point to with 
pride. Thousands of our townsfolk go there for air and 
recreation on Saturdays and Sundays and holidays. There 
are frequently as many as sixty thousand visitors. In 
great crowds' there is always the chance of accidents. 
To sustain the popularity of this great park of ours, and 
to treat those that pleasure in it as human beings, we 
should provide against the possibility of accident. Econ- 
omy is all very well, but it should not take the form of 
criminal carelessness, 



EXPENSIVE FASHIONS IN SCHOOLBOOK3. 

WHILE the gentlemen in charge of achool affairs are 
doing the best they ran, perhaps, the best, in this 
ase. is extremely bad. They have managed to keep 
teachers and parents in a state of turmoil, and when 
solicited to pay some attention to the we fare of the 
public have intimated scornfully that the public might 
undergo the experience Vanderbllt suggest! .1. But there 
is one phase of school management not lately touched upon, 
thi« being the constant, senseless and expensive change in 
text-books. If a book is good for one term, it ought to be 
good for the same grade the next term, but it is not so 
regarded. A child is instructed to secure a certain set of 
books, and having used them desires to sell them only to 
find that there is no market; a new set has been substi- 
tuted. The cost of books is much too high, by reason of 
the quantity made necessary by the rules. To enter the 
High school now a pupil must pay out at once $17.50. 
This is practically prohibitory to a large number of 
families. Certainly there is many a laboring man anxious 
to have his boys and girls educated, who could not afford 
it at any such figure. At the end of each term the pupil 
finds on hand a large proportion of these books wholly un- 
used, blanks without a scratch in them, and yet ascending 
a grade, must procure new blanks, and a fresh set of 
books of all sorts. That this tends to make the higher 
classes exclusive, bars out the poor, and burdens the well- 
to-do, there can be no question, and it is a burning shame. 

EX-SPEAKER REED HEARD FROM. 

EX-SPEAKER Reed is not a man to readily drop out 
of sight. His hard-headed jokes would keep him 
in the public mind if nothing else did. It was thought 
that he was on "the black list" of the Republican National 
Committee, but that does not appear to be so, for the 
committee the other day applied for his services in the 
conduct of the campaign. But would it not have to bar- 
gain that he take back his epigrams at the expense of 
McKinley and the party? Would it not, at least, be well 
to confine his speeches to audiences that have never heard 
of his gibes about the "Emperor of Expediency?" and 
that had never heard of his famous message to the Re- 
publicans in Congress, i.e., "why they should bother to 
pass a bill to punish petty larceny in Cuba, when they 
themselves meant to steal the whole island?" The 
National Committee naturally enough desires to employ 
Reed's tongue against Bryan's, only that he might break 
loose and administer one of his old-time, back-handed 
knock-outs. The ex-Speaker has had too much fun in- 
dulging in flings at his old associates to renounce the 
amusement easily. He knows them so well that he can 
lay his finger on the raw every time. What a big Repub- 
lican show would be made through the country if Senator 
Hoar, Senator Edmunds, Governor Dawes, Carl Schurz, 
and last, but not least, ex-Speaker Reed should take the 
stump as anti-imperialists? 

THE filthy, porous streets of Chinatown still remain a 
mute testimonial to the owners of property in that dis- 
trict, most of whom are white men, so far as their outside 
complexions are concerned. These property owners pre- 
tend to evade responsibility on account of the fact that in 
years gone by the Chinatown streets were paved with sec- 
ond-hand cobbles and "accepted" by the city. Therefore, 
they say, the city should put the streets in good shape 
now. The cobblestone age is past, this is the day of bitu- 
men. Give Chinatown good bituminized streets and alleys 
on which the hose may be played and there will be no ex- 
cuse for bubonic plague scares. The Supervisors are 
powerless in the matter because they have no moneys at 
hand to vote for the improvement, but the Board of 
Health can condemn the entire district and compel the 
property owners to make the necessary improvements. 
Once again it is up to the Board of Health. 

ftNNO T JNCEMENT is made of valuable archeological 
discoveries in New Mexico. The account is circum- 
stantial, accompanied by pictures, with dates, names and 
places. Yet no intelligent reader believes a word of it 
simply because it emanates from a daily paper. In this 
fact there is a volume as to the status of the press; and 
it is not a pleasing volume. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August ii, 1900. 



LI HUNG CHANG. 

LI HUNG CHANG is a rich man — a very rich man. 
Said to be richest in the world. His wealth is com- 
puted to equal that of the Rothschilds or the Vanderbilts, 
and it is said by students of Chinese history that he could 
buy any two of them. He takes precious good care, how- 
ever, not to keep the bulk of it in China. He is known to 
have an enormous account with the Bank of England, and 
lesser ones banked in Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg. 
That is the main reason why "the old fox with the gray 
goatee," as a great traveler has called bim, has always been 
favored by Europe as China's foreign minister. His inter- 
ests have rather been in Europe than in China. He has 
long been a j>ersona grata in every capital on the Conti- 
nent, and has often been dubbed ''China's Grand Old Man," 
although a greater knave never lived. 

Yet in 1840 this enormously rich man was a puny or- 
phan boy, working on a rice boat in the marshes of Hewi 
Ling, where he was born. His environment on all sides 
was simply rice fields. Pour years later he managed to 
reach Canton a friendless and ragged beggar. But he 
was bright, and attracting the attention of a mandarin of 
his town, he was admitted to the famous study cells where 
he was fed, clothed and given a good education in that 
"effete" and "barbarous" land. In 1849 he had by hard 
study outclassed all his competitors, and became Secre- 
tary of the Province of Kowloon. In the following year 
this Viceroy led 50,000 men against a rebel uprising. He 
was killed in action, and Li Hung Chang assumed the 
vacant leadership, and was fortunate enough to win a 
great victory, and at one bound he was on the high road 
to fame and fortune. 

Soon he was called to Peking to become Secretary of 
War, and in the ten years that followed he studied and 
mastered the whole intricate system of his country's al- 
most incomprehensible government. The year 1865 still 
saw him a poor man, but his opportunity came just before 
that time, and he began to accumulate money. In 1863 
the Taeping rebellion broke out, which the Chinese were 
powerless to put down. They lost men, wasted money, 
but accomplished nothing. Fortunately for Li Hung Chang 
he was left to administer his viceroyalty until the great 
General Gordon, afterwards called "Chinese" Gordon, 
arose and smote the rebels hip and thigh. Li was his 
confidential advisor and trusted friend to the end. To- 
gether they fought for four years with marvelous success. 
Then the Emperor sent for them, and would have given 
Gordon anything his Empire possessed, but the brave 
soldier preferred to return to his own country unrewarded, 
but Li was loaded down with honors and emoluments. 

Li Hung Chang was then appointed Governor-General 
of the Liang King provinces, with four viceroys and 
eighteen hundred mandarins under his orders, and iu ab- 
solute control of all the taxes of the province, including 
the salt tax, the rice tax, the Sfmpan tax, and the 
house tax. These he administered fairly as fairness goes 
in China, but had managed to accumulate $55,000,000 in a 
very short time. Still he remained in imperial favor, aud 
in 1872 carae his culminating triumph. He was made 
viceroy of Pe Chi Li, the imperial province, with a palace 
in the royal city, and practically the collection of all the 
national funds under his control. 

It was a big opportunity in money making. Li began 
by inaugurating a system of squeezing the mandarin tax- 
gatherers in order that be and his master might become 
rich. His emissaries visited the provinces regularly and 
took care to guard the mass of the people from extortion 
at the hands of the mandarins. Li Hung Chang saw that 
with such an immense population there was no necessity 
to crush the individual with excessive taxes. He pun- 
ished mandarins for collecting illegal fees, but of those 
that were collected he kept one-half for himself and turned 
the other half into the imperial treasury. There were 
no false pretenses about Li at all. The Emperor was 
pleased at the large increase to bis share, and the people 
were delighted that the last drop of blood was not drained 
out of their bodies. 

Then Li started building a new navy. He let contracts 
for ships, armaments, dock yards, etc., and "stood in" 
with European contractors. The ravy brought him much 
money, and the army more. On the silver question he 
"saw" candidate Bryan and went him some better. He 



gave his people the 45 cent dollar and grabbed the re- 
maining 55 cents for himself. He skillfully manipulated 
the imperial deposits in the great Hong Kong and Shang- 
hai Bank, of which he is now the principal stockholder. 
He is in large part the owner of the China Merchant 
Steam Navigation Company, which has a monopoly of the 
entire coast trade, and the export duties on silks, teas, 
the jade mines, and the revenues of many cities are still 
his. By these means Li became, and is, the richest man 
in the world, but what else he is nobody knows. Just now, 
neither his head nor his wealth can be very safe. The 
one is entirely at the mercy of the Boxers, while the other 
is largely in the hands of the foreigners. 



UNTOWARD EVENTS IN THE PHILIPPINES. 

MANILA was not distinguished to any extent by 
enthusiasm the other day, when the authorities pre- 
pared a celebration of "Amnesty Day," and invited the 
Filipinos to turn out as Americans do on the Fourth of 
July. From their standpoint they could see no similarity 
between an accomplished independence and an offered 
amnesty. It was an untoward event that two days before 
the appointed time for celebrating, eighty-nine natives 
were killed, and their town bombarded, in revenge for the 
killing of one of our men, by a native he had made drunk. 
This was pretty likely to have had a chilling effect on all 
surviving Filipinos, and to have marred the celebration. 
Not one Filipino attended it, as also did only a few of our 
own disgusted soldiery. Then the untutored and savage 
Filipinos may not have understood that the massacre, 
just alluded to, was mercifully intended, and really meant 
American Sovereignty, which, as President McKinley said 
the other day, "is the symbol and pledge of peace, justice, 
law, religion, freedom, education, and the security of life 
and property." Another very untoward event was the 
prohibition by the Provost of the display of the Filipino flag 
in the procession and of McKinley's and Aguinaldo's 
picture framed together. It is to be hoped there was 
nob^y there who insists upon wearing the green when in 
the United States, or of displaying the bare-legged Tartan. 
The fiesta is generally considered by the Americans in 
Manila to have been premature and unfortunate. The 
untowardness of the events certainly seems to justify that 
view. 

"LOGS ADRIFT!" 

ONCE again is the Pacific Coast a menace and a danger 
to navigation. A huge raft, being towed up from 
Mendocino to this port by two small steamers, kept break- 
ing apart all the way, and only a small number of the 
logs succeeded in reaching San Francisco. The balance 
are now floating on the ocean between here and Mendo- 
cino. Of course vessels of all classes are in imminent 
peril of running up against them in that crowded portion 
of the coast. Rising only an inch or two above the sur- 
face, they cannot be seen until a vessel is right down upon 
them; then may heaven help the ship, her cargo, and her 
passengersl The worst of it is that these dangers are of 
quite frequent occurrence. Every few weeks men ac- 
customed to go down to the sea in ships have their wor- 
ries increased by the harassing cry of "logs adrift!" They 
are a greater menace to navigation than unknown reefs, 
which may be either heard or seen. Slowly and silently 
the huge trunks of the largest trees float across the most 
travelled pathways of commerce, and, in consequence, it 
is to be presumed, numerous are the ships that are never 
heard of again. All this can and ought to be put a stop 
to. Peace of mind is a good thing to have, and to enjoy, 
but no passenger, officers or crew can have it up or down 
our coast so long as there are logs adrift. Warning 
seems to be of no use. Somebody should throw stones. 



THEY are still looking for the will of the late Mrs. 
Townsend, and the chances are they will look for it 
a long time. People who make wills and put them away 
in secret drawers in their residences are never sure that 
the lawyers will not get all or most of the estate. Mrs. 
Townsend should have kept her precious papers in a box 
at the California Safe Deposit vaults. She would have 
saved her heirs a lot of trouble and expense, and saved 
newspaper subscribers a lot of stupid reading. 



August ii, 1900 



KIW8 i.KTTKrt. 



BARBER-SHOP ATROCITIES 
and HOME-USED RAZORS. 

B» REGINALD ECMVYLER. 

WHEN the good God gave whiskers to the face of man 
he planted many troubles acd stole away a lot of our 
precious time. To shave oneself or to have oneself 
shaved— that is the question. To spend several years of 
one^s life in a barber shop, or to spend them in mowing 
one's own features. At a first glance this question may 
seem trivial, but in reality it is one of the most important 
in life. I have lost a fortune in my day at Monte Carlo, I 
have had my hat carried off by the wind in a crowded 
street and have been compelled to give chase after it. I 
have seen the other fellow wed with the girl who would 
have made a delightful Mrs. Schuyler, I have attended a 
ball at the Chutes, I have held a strange woman's damp 
infant in a railway carriage while she forgot to come back, 
I have beard Norma Whalley sing— but these sorrows are 
as nothing to what I have suffered in barber shops. 

My advice to all young men is, Learn to shave yourself. 
If you are not a young man go forth to the hardware 
store and buy one of those horseless safety razors and half 
shave yourself. If the feat were possible I would advise 
men to cut their own hair, and their own beards, when 
addicted to the latter. For there is misery that melts the 
very marrow of the soul in the tonsorial parlor, be it never 
so swell and the man behind the razor never so gentle. I 
have waited for a "turn" at the barber's until every 
nerve in my body has been dancing ; I have watched the 
hands of the clock go round until my appointment (which I 
could keep only with a clean face) has become a thing of the 
past; I have done the uopardonable thing of being late at 
a dinner; I have kept a theatre party waiting; I have 
missed boats and trains — all on account of a barber-shop. 
Now I shave myself. My man is a willing fellow and 
clever, but I will not trust him to use the blade on me. 
Besides, I have no barber-chair in my bathroom, and to 
be shaved in any other kind of a chair is simply neck- 
breaking. I go to the shop nowadays but once a week, 
and then only to have my hair scissored. There are bar- 
ber-shops and barber-shops, but they are all chambers of 
horrors for me. At the clubs they have one barber, or 
two barbers at best, and just when you need their ser- 
vices the servants will tell you that half a dozen fellows 
have sent in their names ahead of you. But one can, if 
one has it to spare, put in the time around the club; while 
in the ordinary barber-shop of commerce the chances are 
two to one that you will have to wait and wait while some 
bookmaker has a hair cut, shampoo and shave, and long 
exchange of confidence with the barber. When finally 
you do get into the chair and tell the man you are in a 
hurry, he will start out like a messenger boy just tipped, 
give you a few swift pokes with the brush, rub the lather 
in until you can taste it, and then settle down for a leis- 
urely shave, punctuated by unconsciously impertinent 
small talk about politics, prize fi/hts and weather, and 
perfumed by an onion breath. You writhe and gaze 
madly at the clock, but he pays no attention to your 
mood. 

Finally you tell him that you are in a hurry. He gives 
a few farewell scrapes, smothers you in a "hot towel" 
that smells of the last guest, slaps you a couple of times 
with a cold wet rag, inquires if you will have bay rum — ye 
gods, yes, bay ruml — throws you into an upright position 
and wets your hair unless you stop him in time, offers you 
vaseline, oil, or an obscene mixture which he calls tonic, 
starts to chalk your face, gives you a couple of good-bye 
flips with a dry towel, removes the calico sheet that has 
held you prisoner, and shouts "Next." And then he ex- 
pects a tip. You give him the tip, because you know that 
if you don't and ever come to bis hands again he will make 
your face look like a map. 

How different it is to get up in the morning, jump into 
a tub, put on a gown, lather your own countenance, aud 
quietly remove a day's beard. Less time, less trouble, 
more cleanliness, more self-respect. The first important 
step in a young man's life is a self made shave. 

Aftek twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Japan- 
ese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



New Map of 

California 

FREE 



A new map of the State of California, 
right up to date, will be given free to any 
applicant either by mail or in person. 
Address Santa Fe Office, 628 Market St., 
San Francisco. 




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Choice Wines and Liquors. 

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445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Francisco 
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C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS_^> 

No. 532 GLATf STREET, 3. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August ii, iqoo. 




Tkajurelf 

Wand 

3l OJk obey no wand but Pleasure 's.*^ 

— Tom Jioort, -»<^mH 




WILTON LACKAYE does his best work since Sven- 
gali in the part of the aged potter in Tlie Middleman. 
His performance is really one of record. I have seen 
Willard do good acting in the same role, and still I have 
no hesitation in saying that Lackaye does the best that 
has ever been done in this piece. There was not a very 
big house at the Grand on Monday night when Mr. Fraw- 
ley's production was put on, nor apparently a very en- 
thusiastic one, judging from the way the tiresome first 
act of Mr. Jones' play was received, but it was a wise 
audience, all right, and at the end of the second act, and 
at the end of the third, and at the end of the fourth it 
rose to a thorough appreciation of the actor's work. 

It takes a part of this kind to give us anything like a 
real idea of the stuff that is in Wilton Lackaye. He is all 
very well and finished in a swell part or as a con- 
ventional villain, but in a character like this of almost 
profound individuality, where every poise and gesture 
counts, where every tone must be intoned just so, it re- 
quires an artist, a virtuoso in the detail of the stage — al?o 
magnetism and warm human expression. Lackaye is in 
every way qualified for this part. He has the artist's eye 
for detail and the musician's ear for tone; he makes his 
character intense, but he never over-does it. I have 
listened to nothing in a long time that moved me as his 
prayer-curse scene did in the end of the second act. In 
the mouths of most actors this speech would be pure bom- 
bast. Lackaye makes it creditable, dramatic and human. 
He grips you where you live. 

Mr. Frawley's production is well schemed and I dare 
say well rehearsed, but on Monday night it suffered at the 
hands of the stage mechanics, who placed the scenery 
carelessly and played havoc with the properties. Since 
then, however, everything has been running smoothly. 

There is nothing much to say about the company this 
week. Miss Riccardo played the potter's daughter as she 
might have played an adventuress, which was altogether 
the wrong interpretation. Miss Van Buren could have 
handled the part handsomely. We have not had enough 
of Miss Van Buren this season, come to think of it. She 
is a help to the company in a small part as well as a big 
one. Mr. Armory and Miss Evans got a lot of fun out o f 
the comic relief parts, but there is nothing in the rest of 
the cast that one remembers. The play does not represent 
Henry Arthur Jones at his best. It offers huge oppor- 
tunities to the principal character actor, bat beyond that 
its chances are conventional and perfunctory. 
* * * 

The Tivoli has revived the triumph of last year's grand 
opera season with a big production of Aida, in which 
Salassa and Avedano play their original parts. Of 
Salassa's Iago I have written frequently. It is his master 
work, and would do credit to a much more ostentatious 
organization than the one at the Tivoli. From the his- 
trionic point of view it is practically perfect, and vocally 
it is overwhelming. Every good singer or actor finds in 
his experience one part which fits him better than all 
others, which stamps the memory of himself on his audi- 
ence. Salassa's Iago is one of these creations not soon 
forgot. The role requires extreme subtility. Most opera 
singers would be absurd in the part. Opera in its obvious 
trustfulness seldom deals with a character as complicated 
as Iago. Verdi surpassed himself when he wrote this part 
in his best opera. His Otello will live even when Aida is 
forgotten. This is not an opera for a great cast like Aida 
or Faust or Tlie Huguenots or a dozen others; it shows the 
influence of the latter Wagner in that the usually obtru- 
sive choruses and ensembles are used but frugally. It is 
real lyric drama, in which the action is as realistic as 
music can make it, in which every word of the text is given 
its proper weight and note. Avedano's Othello is good 
without being sensational. The mannerisms of the old- 
fashioned Italian opera butt in here and there and steal 



away illusion. Mr. Avedano has a habit of putting both 
hands to his breast in the strenuous moments, of lifting 
them rythmatically, of throwing them at the audience. 
These gestures represent a by-gone school, for they mean 
nothing but make-believe. Still Avedano has a good re- 
sonant voice, and in the duet with Iago in the second act 
he shines conspicuously. Miss Lichter, faithful and true, 
is the Desdemona in the absence of a better artist. I 
have nothing to blame her for in this personation, but 
neither can I praise her, for it altogether lacks in spell 

and dramatic enthusiasm. 

* * * 

The alternating opera at the Tivoli was Rigoletto, in 
which Repetto did some marvelous singing. All told it is 
the best production of Rigoletto the Tivoli has ever given. 

* * * 

George Ade, the Chicago newspaperman who wrote 
"Artie" and "Fables in Slang," is guilty of The Night or 
the Fourth, in which Dunne & Ryley's comedians are cele- 
brating their farewell week at the California, and in which 
Matthews & Bulger will star next season. It is rough as 
yet, but the thread is a good strong one, and when these 
remarkable farce comedians have strung some of their 
own wit and specialties on it, there is no reason why it 
should not serve them well. 

* * * 

Even if Henry Miller wanted to quit playing Eric Tem- 
ple in Heartsease, the public would not let him. As he said 
to a friend the other night, "When I am a doddering driv- 
eler down with gout and gone of voice they will still call 
for Heartsease." One does not have to admire the play or 
chide the thousands of people who do admire it to applaud 
the excellent production the Miller Company has given us 
this week at the Columbia. Mr. Worthing, Mr. Walcott, 
Miss Anglin and Mrs. Whiffen are all and more than their 
parts deserve. Miss Martinot is a bit light for Lady 
Neville, but a bit of lightness in a play so saturated with 
tears is not a bad innovation. Miss Dale can not be 
praised too highly for the charming ingenuousness of her 

Alice Temple. 

* * * 

At the Alcazar Florence Roberts has revived The Coun- 
try Girl, and has duplicated her success of several weeks 
ago. This is one of her prettiest productions, the most 
memorable from the artistic standpoint of anything she 
presented in San Francisco. 

* * * 

There is some bad and a lot of good in the Orpheum bill 
this week. The most of the bad is a man who calls him- 
self Jolly John Nash, and sings and talks to you, and pays 
no attention to the ironical applause with which you greet 
bim. It would pay the Orpheum to pay the Jolly John 
Nash to jolly somebody else. The Nickel Sisters are a 
pleasing feminine substitute for the usual duo of black- 
faced men. They sing rag-time ditties and dance to wear 
their slippers out. Mr. and Mrs. John Mason have a new 
sketch this week, written by John Mason and Clay M. 
Green, and entitled Another Story. It is a pleasing variety 
in that the man is outwitted and snubbed instead of the 
woman, as is usually the case in vaudeville. There are a 
few bright lines but no particular plot, and the acting of 
Mrs. Mason (Katherine Grey) is copiously good. Mr. 
Mason, too, furnishes some excellent comicality in the 
part of the subdued husband. But the star spangled hit 
of the whole show is made by Laura Bennett and Sally 
Stembler in a skit by the irrepressible George M. Cohan, 
named Saplw and Lulu. It is a slangy satire on the 
theatrical business and the egomania of actresses, and 
rendered with surpassing toughness by the Misses Ben- 
nett and Stembler. If you have troubles take them to 
the Orpheum, and you will lose them over this act. 

* * * 

On Sunday night at the Columbia Theatre the fourth 
series of the Burton Holmes Lectures will be presented 
with the subject "The Grand Canon of the Colorado in 
Arizona." The lecture was successfully delivered by 
Louis Francis Brown on Thursday afternoon and proved 
exceptionally tine. The illustrations are magnificent. 
Next Thursd y afternoon and on the following Sunday 
night the fifth series of the Burton Bolmes Lectures will 
be given with "Moki Land" as the subject. 






August n, 1900. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTKK. 






m having proved to be in so great a demand m 
to crowd tbe Columbia Theatre at every performance this 
week the management has decided to continue to pi 
it 00 Monday. Tuesday and Wednesday evenings and 
Wednesday matinee of next week. On next Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday nights acd Saturday matinee 
Anthony Hope's romantic comedy The ,f The 

Lady l'r$\,ln will be staged for the only times during the 
present season, as all is in readiness for the production of 
The Only Way to be staged on Monday night the 20th. 
Miller has brought direct from New York the veteran 
actor J. H. Stoddard as well as Daniel H. Harkins and 
Joseph Brennan for appearance in the coming production 
Of The Only Way. 

Next week will be the seventh week of the Frawley en- 
gagement at the Grand Opera House. It will be marked 
by a noteworthy revival of Du Maurier's famous Trilby as 
dramatized by Paul Potter. This production will be 
signalized by the presence of two of the most prominent 
members of the original New York cast in the persons of 
Wilton Lackaye, and Ignacio Martinetti; the latter has 
been specially engaged to again sparkle and effervesce in 
his delightfully carbonated characterization of the volatile 
Zou-Zou. Harrington Reynolds will be the Taffy, and 
George Gaston the Rev. Mr. Bagot of the present pro- 
duction. Mary Van Buren after a two weeks' absence 
will return to the cast and submit herself to the weird 
hypnotic spell of Wilton Lackaye's Svengali in the name 
part. After the deluge of "Trilby" — what.? Mr. Frawley 
answers, The Silver King. 

Owing to the enormous demand for seats for Othello and 
Rigoletto, and the heavy preparations for Tannhauser and 
Mignon, the Tivoli Opera House has decided to continue 
Othello and Rigoletto for another week, beginning with 
next Monday, August 13th. Othello will be sung on Mon- 
day, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday nights, while 
Rigoletto will be heard on Tuesday, Thursday, Sunday 
nights and Saturday matinee of next week. This Satur- 
day night the bill is Othello, and for to-morrow night (Sun- 
day) the opera will be Rigoletto. All seats purchased for 
the performances of Tannhauser and Mignon for next week 
can be exchanged seven days ahead, commencing with 
next Monday, for the week of August 20th, . when Tann- 
hauser and Mignon will positively be produced. 

Palmer Cox's ever popular operetta, The Broionies in 
Fairyland, will be revived on an elaborate scale at the 
California Theatre to-morrow afternoon and every evening 
of next week, with matinees Tuesday, Thursday, Satur- 
day and Sunday. All of the principal parts will be played 
by actors who, though small in stature and few in years, 
are thoroughly at home in the glare of the footlights. All 
the songs, dances, specialties, costumes and scenery will 
be entirely new, and nearly a hundred children will be in 
the cast. 

The Pour Juggling Johnsons, who head the list of new 
comers at the Orpheum, are said to have one of the best 
club juggling acts in the country. The engagement of 
Mrs. Bessie Blitz Paxton is of peculiar interest. A sister- 
in-law of General Warfield of this city and a social favorite 
and one of the best known members of the local smart set, 
Mrs. Paxton has decided to use the voice which added 
much to her social popularity, in a professional way. 
Sam Morris and Company will present a "legitimate 
comedietta," and Macart's Dogs and Monkeys should 
prove popular for the children. 

A new play from the pen of Charlotte Thompson, author 
of Only The Master Shall Blame, will be presented for the 
first time on any stage at the Alcazar on Monday night. 
It is written for Florence Roberts, is named A Suit of 
Sable and deals with the "over-training of children" and 
"artificial motherhood." 



Comet de Orient. 

Cigarette de Luxe— finest Turkish tobacco. At M. Blaskowek & 

Co. , 223 Montgomery St. and 1 Kearny St. , cor. Geary, San Francisco. 



Gas Consumers' Association, 316 Post street. Reduces gas bills 
from twenty to forty per cent. Electric and gas meters tested. 

If you travel, fish, hunt or play golf your constant companion 
should be Jesse Moore. 



Morosco's Grand Opera House. 

W u.i ' -o)» Lb— go »i»'1 Mti 

The New FRAWLEY Company 

In V*\t\ P..tier> (|r*mftlU*tl«n ol [>n MAurtrr* U><> 

TRILBY 

Willon IJkrkAyr, n* Hvenffftll: Ignitcl<> Martinet!) a* Zou-Zou. 

Mary Van Huron n* Trilby. 

in pmnralion: Tiir Rilvm Ell 

Prices; Pv \ f. «« front row* In orchestra, 75o 

Saturday matinee: 10o„ I.V.. 2.V.. SOo. 

P-*l! £«-«:-* TUa^I^ THK popular BOOB! 

OailTOrnia I neat.re. KesenrMlonii by 'Phone. MalnlTSl 

They have come hack, thoae real lire Brownie*, preaentlnir Uio 

beautiful «. pontile »pc Inole. 

THE BROWNIES IN FAIRYLAND 

A miuriiilii cut productmn in every purtlculnr. Wonderful trans- 
formation acene. Bntftro profession^] caal of principal*. No 
amateur- In this production. 

J>ati--. Sunday afternoon, August 12th, and every evening com- 
mencing with Monday. August 13lh. Matinees Tuesday, Thurs- 
day, Saturday and Sunday. Popular Prices, 
foniine: LICK, the world's greatest hypnotist. 

G_ I. .— «L ■ TL^-nl.—** Oottlob, Marx A Co.. 

OIUmDia I neaXre. Lessees and Managers. 

Commencing next Monday, eighth week of the Henry Miller 
season. Monday. Tuesday, and Wednesday nights, and Wed- 
nesday matinee. 

HEARTSEASE 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, and Saturday matinee, 
THE ADVENTURES OF THE LADY URSULA 
August 20th— The Only Way. 

£\| A . _ „ T*L I BELASCO & THALL, Managers. 

rAlcazar I neatre. phon e .Main254 

Week of August 13th. Third month of Florence Roberts, sup- 
ported by White Whittlesey. First time on any stage, 

A SUIT OF SABLE 



By Charlotte Thompson. 
Alcazar Prices — 15c., 25c., 35c. , 50c. 



Only Matinee Saturday 



. Ernestine Keeling, 
Proprietor and Manager. 



Tivoli Opera House. 

OTHELLO and RIGOLETTO 

■will be continued all next week. 

Monday, Wednesday, Fridayi Saturday nights OTHELLO. 
Tuesday. Thursday, Sunday nights. Saturday matinee. RIGO- 
LETTO. 

Week of August 20th: Tannhauser and Mignon. 
Popular p rices— 25 and 50 cen ts. Telephone 'Bush 9. 

0_ L _ ,_-, San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 
I P R 6 U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

FOUR cJUGGLIMG JOHNSONS 



Sam Morris & Co. 

Mrs. Bessie Blitz Paxton 

Meeker Baker Trio 

American Biograph 

Reserved Seats 25o.: balcony 10c; opera ohairs and box seats 50c, 

Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 



Macart's Dogs and Monkeys 
Bennett & Steinbler 
Hooker & Davis 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 
over. 

Lyceum Theatre School of Acting, 

310-312 O'FARRELL ST., one block from Alcazar and Orpheum, S. F. 

The largest and mostcompleto School of Acting and Dramatic Agency west 
of New York. Suitable positions guaranteed to finished pupils. For terms 
call on or address F. W. STECHAN, Manager. Send for prospectus. 

Professor F. Bouley's Select Dancing Academy in conjunction with Ly- 
ceum School of Acting. Ballroom, Fancy and Stage Dancing taught in 
classes and private lessons. 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tallers, etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 



Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento street, San Francisco, Tel. 5610 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building. San Francisco. Cal "] 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August ii, iqoo. 



WE 








LibraryGabk 



Spencer and Mr. Hector Macpherson of Edinburgh, in the 
Spencerism. preface to his latest boob, "Spencer and 
Spencerism," states that the object of his 
work is to present Spencerism — that philosophy which 
has been the battleground of controversialists for so 
many years — to the general reader in lucid, coherent 
form. "Nothing," he adds, "can take the place of Mr. 
Spencer's own writings, but mastery of these demands an 
amount of leisure and philosophic enthusiasm which are 
by no means widespread." This book is most opportune, 
coming as it does about the time of Mr. Spencer's eightieth 
birthday and shortly after the completion of the monu- 
mental "System of Synthetic Philosophy," which forms 
his life work. Mr. Macpherson, himself an author and 
editor, has been more than fortunate in that be has had 
the personal assistance of Mr. Spencer in preparing this 
authorized biography. He has naturally been greatly 
aided in his estimate of the philosopher's system of thought 
by a close acquaintance with the great thinker. The au- 
thor expresses his obligations to Professor Hudson of 
California for bis admirable book, "Introduction to the 
Philosophy of Herbert Spencer." One need only read the 
closing pages of Mr. Macpberson's work to realize how 
fully it was a labor of love. In summing up the life and 
life-work of the great man, the negative attitude of whose 
philosophy towards religion has called forth so much 
criticism, Mr. Macpherson says: "Whatever the future 
has in store for philosophy, one prediction may be safely 
made, that humanity will owe to Herbert Spencer an 
everlasting debt of gratitude. Forty years ago he set 
himself a colossal task. He resolved to give to the world 
a new system of philosophy. Ill-health dogged the foot- 
steps of the philosopher all through the long spell of years, 
and at times it seemed as if the Synthetic Philosophy 
would be left an unfinished monument of splendid audacity. 
Handicapped by ill health, uncheered by popular sympa- 
thy, unrewarded by the reading public, Herbert Spencer 
went his lonely way with a courage akin to heroism. Now 
be sees his task completed. Only those who have been 
privileged with Mr. Spencer's friendship fully know the 
difficulties with which he had to battle, and can estimate 
the victory he has won. * * * Herbert Spencer may rest 
from his labors with the proud consciousness that with 
his own right hand he has carved his path from obscurity 
to a philosophic throne. He now stands among the scep- 
tered immortals." 

Spencer and Spencerism: by Hector Macpherson. Doubleday, Page & Co.. 
Publishers. New York. Price, 81.26. 

"Personal Impressions" for August is quite up to its 
usual standard. A very original article, "California and 
the Human Ideal," by Charles Ferguson, is followed by 
a criticism of Vance Thompson's "French Portraits," by 
Professor W. H. Hudson of Stanford University, in which 
he ridicules the mannerisms and affectations of the de- 
cadents. "An Appraisal of Robinson Crusoe," by Lieu- 
tenant Calkins; "Libraries in the Middle Ages," by Ed- 
ward Bull Clapp; "Further Opinions of Joy," etc., com- 
plete the little booklet. "The Footpath to Peace," by 
Henry Van Dyke, is the leaflet for the month. 

Elder & Sbepard, Publishers. San Francisco. Price, 50 centi a year. 

Another dainty little volume has been added to the 
friendly and helpful "Nuggets" series. To "Don't Worry 
Nuggets," "Patriotic Nuggets," "Educational Nuggets," 
and " Historical Nuggets," all attractive collections of 
words of wisdom, is now added "Quaint Nuggets," gath- 
ered by Eveline Warner Brainerd. The present book is 
made up of choice gleanings from the writings of Thomas 
Fuller, Joseph Hall, John Selden, George Herbert, and 
Izaak Walton, who lived "in that heavy century in Eng- 
land between 1580 and 1C80." The selections are intelli- 
gently made and ably prefaced. Fords, Howard & Hul- 
bert, Publishers, New York. Price, 45 cents. 



" Brown of Lost River," A Story of the West, by Mary 
E. Stickney, "The Seafarers," A Modern Romance, by 
John Bloundelle Burton, "The Ministers Guest," A Novel, 
by Isabel Smith, and "A Maker of Nations," by Guy 
Boothby are the latest issues in Appleton's Town and 
Country Library. The continued success of this series, 
published semi monthly, is no doubt due to the fact that 
much care is exercised in selecting just the right sort of 
fiction, and that as a rule one may always count upon 
finding an entertaining book under its well-known covers. 

D. Appleton & Co., Publishers, New York. Price. 312.00 per annum, 

"The Black Homer of Jimtown," by Ed. Mott, is a 
collection of some eighteen stories which appeared 
originally in the New York Sun. These "coon" stories 
are full of fun and fancy, if one can manage to get at 
these useful literary adjuncts through the medium of a 
darkey dialect almost impossible to decipher at times. 
Black Homer has all the characteristics of the old time 
Southern darky, his superstitions, and childlike faith, his 
unctuous humor and boundless imagination and knows how 
to tell a story well. 

Crossett & Dunlap. Publishers, New York. Price, 81,25. 

"Jonathan's New Boy," by Pythias Damon, is an alle- 
gorical story. It deals principally with the war with the 
Philippines, and is a satirical arraignment of a great 
nation, which "by force of numbers and superiority of 
equipment subjugates a people inferior in numbers and 
civilization." 

T. S. Denison. Publisher, Chicago. Paper covers. Price, 25 cents. 

Walter Scott's "Lady of the Lake" is the latest addi- 
tion to the "Macmillan's Pocket English Classics," a 
series of English Texts, edited for use in Secondary Schools, 
with critical Introductions, Notes, etc. This volume is 
edited by Elizabeth A. Packard, Head of English and 
History in the High School at Oakland, California. An 
interesting introduction and copious notes, supplement a 
book which will appeal to those who desire to arrive at a 
better understanding of Walter Scott's romantic Highland 
poem. The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York. 
Price 25 cents. 

"The Point of Contact in Teaching," by Patterson 
Dubois, has reached a fourth edition. It is revised and 
enlarged to such a degree that the present manual is 
practically a new work, although there is no variance in 
essential purport between the first three editions and this 
revision. How to instruct a child to the best advantage, 
and how to touch successfully his life interests, is the 
problem considered by the author. Mr. Dubois is a 
Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, and has written at various times in the inter- 
est of better educational standards. Dodd, Mead & Co., 
Publishers, New York. Price 75 cents. 

"The Boarder of Argyle Place," by George Toile, is a 
book that will scarcely repay reading, but the fact that 
it is the author's first attempt should be accounted an ex- 
tenuating circumstance. The boarder, notwithstanding 
his witticisms, is an insufferable bore, and his pretty sweet- 
heart, who is "flabberghasted" so soon as she perceives 
"his burglarious intentions upon her heart," is equally un- 
attractive. R. F. Fenno & Co., Publishers, New York. 
Price, tl.25. 

"With Lawton and Roberts," by Elbridge S. Brooks, is 
the story of a wide-awake American boy's experiences in 
the Philippines and the Transvaal. Deeds of heroism, 
courage, persistency and pluck can never fail to interest, 
and of these Mr. Brooks's story of war in two lands and 
under three flags is full. "With Lawton and Roberts" 
is announced as the first volume of a new series by Mr. 
Brooks — the "Young Defender Series." Lothrop Pub- 
lishing Company, Boston. Price, $1.25. 

"The Strong Arm,'' by Robert Barr, is a story of the 
Middle Ages and of those who, living along the banks of 
the placid Rhine, loved dearly to fight and to swing their 
huge broadswords upon every and all occasions. There 
are ten other short stories in the volume, all told with 
Mr. Barr's usual ability. Frederick A. Stokes Co., Pub- 
lishers, New York. M. E. B. 



August ii, 1900 



s\\ n:\- .. : . \r.ws LITTER. 



I 



t 



Ucwn Crier 



-*m Har tlxCntrl'.rfhat the dtni art tl*u 
' ■ .'Mr mltptif Pk <*iv/. jir. - ttiyou ' 




FIGHTING Charlie Mdntosb. 
You're a deadly shot, be gosh ! 
You're a blooming crack-a jack 

As a Boxer slayer. 
Kvery day you flew a score. 
Kvery night you slaughtered more; 
*' Save us, Lord , from Mcintosh I" 
Was the Boxer's prayer. 

Kvery morn when you arose 
You'd put on your righting clothes, 
Then you'd load your gun and range 

Free about the town; 
Kvery time your rifle boomed 
One more pig-tailed head was doomed, 
One more Boxer, still in death, 

Sank forever down. 

Fighting Charlie Mcintosh, 

It's a shame, and that's no josh! 

That you left the Taku forts 

Makes us feel despondent. 
China offers occupation 
For that weird imagination 
As a world-enlightening 

Chinese correspondent. 

JUST why California should be especially infested by 
cranks has never been satisfactorily explained. Here 
is the Tingley woman, the voice of a she-wolf howling in 
the wilderness of dementia summoning fools that she may 
pick the bones of them, and the fools flock to her. They 
become her slaves. She robs them of money and effort, 
growing fat as they wax lean. She rules by playing upon 
superstition, and they in their fatuous ignorance regard 
the gross and scheming virago as something akin to the 
divine. As a matter of fact she merits the punishment 
deal out to any other operator in gold bricks, for 
Katherine is not crazy. She is a shrewd and conscience- 
less robber, with more cheek than a mule, and seeming to 
have intelligence only because her dealings are carried on 
with crack -brains who for their own protection should be 
placed in asylum, as she should be placed in jail. She is 
as bad as the Eddy woman, one of the most notorious of 
fakers, as Teed, Schweinfurth or any other of the unholy 
and unhanged gang, preying on human credulity. Cali- 
fornia is a large State, but it ought not to be large enough 
to accommodate so vicious and so vile a nuisance as 
Tingley. 

^LAMBDA County needs to reform its constabulary 
and its Injustices of the Peace. There is prevalent 
over there a habit of arresting men and boys who are in 
search of work, and sending them to jail as vagrants. 
That any official concerned in such an outrage, should 
himself be sent to jail, is to state the truth mildly. He 
should be put in a chain gang, and his victims be given a 
per diem for lashing him should he try to loaf. The mere 
fact of being out of work is not a crime, however repre- 
hensible may be the mistake of being in Alameda County. 
To seek work is meritorious, not properly rewarded by 
imprisonment. Fruit growers are clamoring for help, yet 
an industrious person answering the call is likely to run 
foul of a fool constable, be haled before a fool court, and 
adjudged a violator of law. 

THE Cafe Eoyal gambling house seldom keeps out of 
print for more than a few days at a time. Its latest 
bid for notoriety was the act of the proprietors in causing 
the arrest of a chronic patron who seems to have made 
some ado over the disappearance of his hard-earned 
money. Yet there is no need of wasting sympathy on the 

Eatron, who must be akin to an idiot. The Cafe' Royal 
as the approval of the Police Commission. Its particular 
style of gamblirjg is not tabooed, probably on the ground 
that poker, with a sucker on one side and a professional 
tin-horn on the other, lacks every element of a game of 
chance. 



I hard to understand why no much fuss should be 
l« about gambling j n Chinatown. Since t 
have been given one nf the best parts of San Frai 
what theymav do in it is nf little importance sn tha' 
keep clean. To make thorn do this, tod 10 force the white 
property owners to contribute to the purification, is the 
duty of the health officers and the police, for the result 
concerns the public. But the gambling dens in the heart 
of Chinatown are nothing In which the public has any in 
terestor concern. White men visiting them should be 
classed as vagrants, but having chased these away, let 
the dens flourish openly, for they will flourish anyhow. 
At present the effort to suppress them results in nothing 
more than the corruption of the police, and an effort to 
keep the police pure and undefiled is worth making. Any 
policeman sent to Chinatown for regular duty goes to his 
ruin, for either he will accept bribe money, or he will 
nobly spurn the opportunity, in the latter case being not 
believed, or considered a chump. 

IN ninety-nine. cases out of a hundred, the sympathy of 
the Crier is with the car conductor who is charged 
with having basted the prevalent small boy. Usually such 
injury as has been inflicted resulted from the effort of the 
boy to escape from the clutches of the conductor, who 
would not have hurt him, nor have done more than set bim 
into the street. The small boy is a terror that rides at 
noonday. He objects to paying his way even if he has the 
nickel. He dodges from one end of the car to the other, 
and often seizes the fare-bell and rings a few dimes from 
the conductor's daily wage. When he gets a licking or 
a bump, he richly deserves it. When he falls under the 
wheels the affair becomes tragic and regrettable, but still 
the blame rests with himself. So long as the lad will be a 
hoodlum he will be obliged to take the consequences, 
though they terminate in an inquest. 

THE boom of the Belgian hare has burst. There is sor- 
row in the "rabbitries" and Belgian harems and suf- 
fering among the good people who tried to make pets of 
the pests. Millions have not been lost, but any number of 
poor suckers have lost more than they could afford by at- 
tempting to breed and market these furry insects. 
Restaurant keepers who have been fooiish enough to lay 
in a stock of Belgians find no call for them, and are out the 
sum of their investment. For, once a man of normal taste 
tackles the sickly meat of this obscene quadruped he'll 
never do it again. There is a big fortune for the man who 
will invent a sure-to-kill Belgian hare powder. 

JAMES Taylor Rogers would not talk, 
But chose to go to prison, 
While people wondered why he'd sought 
The sorrow that was his'n. 
" It's just this way," the lawyer said, 
(The explanation's ample), 
" Expecting soon a pood long term 
I thought I'd try a sample." 

ITALY'S request that plotters against the life of King 
Humbert be punished is reasonable and seemly. If a 
lot of beetle-browed, black-hearted ruffians can find 
asylum in this country, and, undisturbed, hatch out 
schemes of murder, there is something wrong with the 
country, and the sooner the remedy be applied the better. 
To shield an assassin behind the pretense that deliberate 
butchery becomes a political offense because its victim 
happens to be a king, is folly which, persisted in, will 
empty (and refill) every throne in Christendom. 



B 



ALTHA8AR, the monarch of Babel, 
He drank all the booze he was able, 
He was drunk every night, 

But before he was tight 
His friends were all under the table. 



IT seems too bad that London should have the bubonic 
plague and the only doctors in the world who know 
anything about the malady be in San Francisco. 

NO Judge of the Superior Court is so displeased with 
the quarters provided in the Hall of Justice as to 
contemplate refusal to be re-elected. 

WHEN Policeman Calnan was detailed to catch a thief, 
all he had to do was to get onto himself. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August ii, 1900: 




Kui Wba, a prince Korean, 
Heir-apparent to a throne, 

By accounts is bent on claiming 
San Francisco for his own. 

Well, he likes the Yankee cocktail 
And our breezy "Western whirl, 

And the large, flirtatious glances 
Of the San Francisco girl. 

Secretary Sin, all vainly 

Eastward bids the royal youth, 
Tears his Oriental tresses — 

Eloquently pleads, forsooth. 

But the prince will choose his tutors 
As befits his regal station. 

There are reasons for preferring 
San Franciscan education. 



Denis Burkhalter, superintendent of the Southern 
Pacific Company at Bakersfield, came into town this week. 
We wouldn't say for the express purpose of recounting 
the following sad plight of Dr. Mays, but he made it an 
incidental part of his business. The Doctor, who unfortu- 
nately has grown deaf during the past few years, was a 
guest at a hotel down Burkhalter'a way not long since. 
The night clerk at the caravansary was also the night 
bartender. Well, the Doctor wanted to be called at seven 
o'clock the following morning, so he went into the bar- 
room and disturbed a game of "cinch" in the far corner 
of the room by shouting: "WU1 you please see that I'm 
called at seven o'clock in the morning?" 

"I will," rejoined the man of cocktails. "What's your 
number?" 

The deaf doctor, using his hand for a megaphone, 
shouted back, "No. 17; and say," he added, "you'll have 
to give me a good shake, because I sleep so soundly. I'll 
just leave my door unlocked so that you can go right in." 

While this conversation was taking place the honest 
farmers in the "cinch" game were busy marking No. 17 
on their cuffs — "Deaf man, room 17; don't wake up unless 
shaken." * * * 

When the Doctor was awakened in the morning, he 
found his trowsers, watch, money, cuff buttons, shirt 
studs, necktie — or, rather, he didn't find them. Pajamas 
were at a premium with him for a time — how long I do 
not know, for right here Denis Burkhalter left me to start 
the story over again for another crowd. 



For a man of letters known the English-speaking world 
over and a journalist famed Ambrose Bierce is but little 
known in person to the friends and enemies of his work. 
Only recently has he consented to the publication of his 
picture in the newspapers for which he writes. He scorns 
the autograph fiend as much as he scorns the policy of 
any newspaper that may engage his pen. When Bierce 
dies there will be large columns of obituary, but few per- 
sonal friends at the funeral; for he has only a few friends, 
and apparently does not care about increasing the num- 
ber. Rarely indeed do you hear an anecdote in which 
Bierce is concerned. That is why I write this one, which 
comes all the way from Washington. 

Bierce was recently a passenger on a Washington- 
bound Potomac steamer. A friend and the friend's wife 
were with him. There was a fresh fancy "coon" aboard, 
and unseen by the men he ogled the lady to such an ex- 
tent that she complained to Bierce and her husband. 
Bierce jumped for the coon and asked him what he meant. 

"Well, she seemed to like it all right," said the Wash- 
ingtonian nigger— and the Washingtonian brand is the 
freshest in the world. 

In a flash Bierce's revolver was out and the coon on his 
knees apologizing. Congressman Hilborn, who was also 



a passenger on the river steamer, had witnessed the 
episode. 

"Bierce," said he, "it's all up with you when we reach 
Washington. That nigger will have you arrested sure, 
and he stands just as good a chance as a white man in the 
Capital City." 

For half an hour Bierce cultivated the society of Hil- 
born. Hilborn, as you may know, looks more like a 
preacher than a politician. He affects a semi-clerical 
garb and religious cast of features. Well, finally Bierce 
said to him: "See here, old man, you'd be doing me a big 
favor by taking this revolver of mine until to-morrow." 

"I'd be glad to carry your gun for you, Bierce, but 
what am I going to do with my own?" answered the man 
with the churchly coat and countenance. 

* * * 

Another Bierce story: A friend of his wrote a book 
some years ago and sent it to Bierce in care of the Ex- 
aminer. Sam Chamberlain was the editor then, yellowing 
for all he was worth. 

"Thanks," wrote Bierce to his friend; "it is a good 
story, well told. Sorry I can't review it, but the editor 

doesn't like books." 

* # # 

I heard Bierce tell a good story at the old "French- 
man's" in Montgomery street one night years ago, when 
the Examiner office was over the way. Mrs. Isaacs' in- 
fant had mouthed the poker table during a family game 
and swallowed a half-dollar. Dr. Rosencranz was called 
at once. 

"Heaven help us, doctor," cried Mrs. Isaacs, "the baby 
has swallowed fifty cents I" 

"Cheer up, Mrs. Isaacs," said the doctor, "it might 
have been two-and-a-half." 

Bierce told that with a dialect that defies type. 

* * * 

Carroll Carrington, a discovery of Bierce's and a good 
one, was one day reading a book on "English," written by 
one of the professors of the State University. Bierce 
looked over his shoulder. 

"Want 10 read it?" asked Carrington. 

"Not on your life: one of those Berkeley idiots that 
write, A preposition is a bad thing to commence a sen- 
tence with.' " 

* * * 

Mrs. Darling was Mrs. Catherwood, passionately fond 
of music, and she fell a victim to Major Darling's harmony 
immediately after the publication of his song, "Recom- 
pense." Then they went to live at the Occidental. After 
spending some time there they changed their quarters 
and went to the Presidio, but finally came back to Major 
Hooper's hotel. 

"I insist in having a piano in my rooms this afternoon," 
said Mrs. Darling to the clerk as soon as she had regis- 
tered. 

"You shall have it," replied the clerk. 

An hour later Mrs. Darling, while standing in the cor- 
ridor, noticed a man approaching with what appeared to 
be an upright. 

"Wheel it right in this way, my man," said she. 

"But it is not for here," he said, "it is for the next 
room." 

"Oh, that doesn't matter," explained Mrs. Darling, 
"you wheel it right in my apartments, and tell Major 
Hooper that Mrs. Darling told you to do so, and it will be 
all'right." 

The man obeyed her and went away. A few moments 
afterwards the Major dug up a piano stool and prepared 
to play — but alas, there was no instrument, the cargo 
wheeled into the room by the porter was simply a Datent 
folding-bed with a false piano front. And now Mrs. 
Darling is said to be about to sue the Major for a divorce. 



This is a joke on another of Oakland's perfect men. He 
has a mania for blondes. Once upon a time he met a gay 
and frolicsome soubrette with auburn locks that boasted 
of weekly applications. Together they paid a visit to the 
Hermitage, the haven for Oakland's angels. She opened 
his heart and his pocket-book on first acquaintance. He 
got a kiss, a promise, and a lock of the auburn hair, tied 






August j i, 1900. 



SAN PR NP.W9 URTTKR 



n 



with a tiny blue ribbon. Carefully in his pcckot l>ook he 
carried that lock of auburn hair, and often n 
the beauty that could be promised at $L' :>0 a botl 

One day wni!e performing her wlfelv duties his spouse 
searched his pockets. She came upon the lock of auburn 
hair, lied with the tiny blue ribbon. At first she was in- 
clined to be mad, but being a woman of sense and ex peri 
ence she simply cut off one of her own inky locks and tied 
it with the bit of tiny blue ribbon. Then she placed every 
thing back in her husband's clothes save the peroxide 
keepsake. That went with the other evidence she had 
been accumulating for years. 

One night at dinner the perfect man turned to his wife 
and asked: "Does bleached hair regain its natural color 
if it is cut from the head?" 

Last week the "missus" loomed out with the swellest 
gowns that Oakland has seen in many a moon. 
a * * 

I have just seen a letter from Paris that gives the low- 
down on the California Colony. Ever since the beginning 
of the Exposition the California Colony has been marked 
out by the wise men of Paris as the superlative of a good 
thing. The leader of the Colony, of course, is Ole Billy 
Foote. Dr. Elliott Wolsey is his running mate and chief 
adviser. Together they have painted the Moulin Rouge 
all the tints of the rainbow. On July Fourth, when Foote 
entered the Moulin Rouge, the orchestra stopped all the 
French airs it was tearing to pieces, and swelled in "The 
Star Spangled Banner," "Dixie," and a bunch of Amer- 
ican tunes, all in honor of the great Commissioner. By 
the way, I have also heard of the famous feast given dur- 
ing the early weeks of July by Foote and the Doctor. 
Blanche Bates was the guest of honor. The dinner was 
called ibscene. 

* # * 

A cavalryman from the Presidio drifted out to the 
Chutes last Saturday night, drank three drinks of alleged 
whiskey, got on the merry-go-round, fell off and smashed 
his shoulder. When he woke up the doctors were prying 
among bis bones. 

"Holy Shatter," moaned he, "here's a man that bron- 
coed San Juan with Teddy, given all the fevers the go-by, 
bathed in canteen brandy, stood off wet reception com- 
mittees in New York— a rough-rider, by gum, laid up by 
three drinks of whiskey and a wooden horse I Let me die, 
and bury me by the name of Smithl" 

THE prominent representatives of the hardware and 
metal trade in San Francisco showed their appreciation 
of Frank L. Brown and their regret at his departure by 
a farewell dinner at the Cosmos Club last Saturday. Mr. 
Brown left for Chicago the following day to become the 
general sales agent of the Shelby Steel Tube Company. 
He takes many good wishes with him and leaves many 
friends behind. 

Under the new management of John F. Heinkelthe Maison Kiche 
is prospering handsomely and the good livers know where to go for 
a finely cooked and perfectly served meal, such as one gets in the 
best restaurants of Paris. The wines are the best brands in the 
world's market and the excellent viands and service together with 
the moderate prices conspire to make this restaurant one of the 
best in America. 

The improved machinery anil the expert workmen employed by 
the Spaulding Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, have 
done away with the horrors of carpet cleaning. Many persons pat 
up with dirty carpets just because they dread the process of renova- 
tion and cleaning. At the Spaulding establishment the work is done 
with dispatch and thoroughness, and old soiled and dusty carpets 
are made to look like new. 



A bestatjbant that has its own distinct atmosphere and is known 
the country over for the excellence of its cooking and. the quiet 
efficiency of its service is Swain's Bakery in Sutter street. For 
twenty years and more this restaurant has enjoyed an exclusive 
patronage. It has a character that is decidedly its own. Orders are 
taken for breads, pastries, ices, chicken sandwiches, etc. 

Theee are fashions in flowers as well as in other things, and 
Leopold the florist, 35 Post street, may always be depended on for 
the freshest and most fragrant. 

Moore's Poison Oak Remedy 
cures poison oak and all skin diseases. Sold by all druggists. 




Well No. 2 of The Florence Oil Development and Ex- 
ploiting; Company. Offices, Safe Deposit Building, San 
Francisco. 

OPHIR OIL CO., 

50 cts. per Share 
800 SLCVGS in the heart of the rlch 

Coalinga District 

3H Miles from Railway Communication. 

DIRECTORS— Warren Gillelen, President Broadway Bank, 
Los Angeles; J. W. A. Off, Cashier State Bank and Trust Com- 
pany, Los Angeles ; John Mason Gardiner, Engineer and Gen- 
eral Contractor of Public Works, Phoenix and Los Angeles ; 
John Martin, President Martin Pipe and Foundry Company, 
Manager Stanley Electric Company, San Francisco; George Kent 
Hooper, Manager Occidental Hotel, San Francisco; Nathaniel .1. 
Manson, Attorney-at-Law, San Francisco; H. R. Hublbut,, fifteen 
years in charge of Advertising Department, San Francisco Call. 
Send for Prospectus. 

OPHIR OIL COMPANY. 

435 Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal 



Laurel Hill Cemetery 



Association 



Sells burial lots and graves. Perpetual care. 
Junction of Bush Street and Central Avenue, San Francisco 



WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS 
AND INVITATIONS .... 



At . . 

■ 123 Qrant Ave., S. F. 



DODGE'S 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



August ii, 1900. 



Financial 




Business fell off during the week, with a 
The Pine Street strong undertone in the South-end shares, 
Market. notwithstanding a light shading off in 

values through the realization of profits 
by "chippers." The better class of dealers have not sold 
much stock. The work now going on in the search for the 
ledge believed to exist in the west country by the Jacket 
and other South-end companies is too important to war- 
rant dropping out at this critical juncture, and the disposi- 
tion apparent is to see the game out, lose or win. Should 
this ledge be cut it will bring about a speedy revival of 
work along the Comstock Lode, and arouse an interest 
among a class of investors which will result in a lively 
competition for the control of the more important proper- 
ties. Capitalists abroad have regarded this lode as a 
dead letter for years past, and for this reason have over- 
looked the possibilities which still exist for a discovery 
which may result in an excitement quite as pronounced as 
any recorded in the past. The day may come when 
sentiment will change, and the true value of these mines, 
ev